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Full text of "Annual report to the Mayor for ..."

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3AN FRANCISCO PU3UC UBRARY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

REFERENCE 
BOOK 

Nul to be taken from the Library 



#N 16 2001 



3 1223 05718 6422 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Fiscal Year 1971-72 



DOC 

OCT 1 ,'1972 



SA.-J FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



September, 1972 



Sr 



3 1223 05718 6422 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and con- 
tractual services for all departments of the City and County, including 
city-owned utilities, the San Francisco Port Commission, the San Francisco 
Unified School District and the San Francisco Community College: repairs 
and maintains automotive and other equipment for the various departments, 
except Public Utilities, and for the School District as requested; operates 
a central reproduction bureau for departments requiring its services; trans- 
fers to other departments for use or sells equipment and supplies no longer 
useful to any department of the city; maintains a perpetual inventory of 
equipment in the various departments; and operates central stores of the 
Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the 
Shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying 
on new products, specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 



Employments totaled 202 permanent in four bureaus. The Organization 
Chart is shown in the Appendix. 



SUPERVISORY - June 30, 1972 



Administrative 



T. F. Conway - Purchaser of Supplies - To March 31, 1972 
J. C. Gavin - Purchaser of Supplies - From April I, 1972 
C. D. Morel lo - Secretary 



Bureaus 



Buy i ng 

J. C. Gavin - Assistant Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head 

(To 3/31/72) 
G. A. Clarke - Senior Purchaser 
C. J. Morrissey - Coding Supervisor (Acting) 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. H. Beck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 
J. A. Frantz - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 



- I - 



4 45246 SFPL: ECONO JRS 
225 SFPL 12/22/00 100 



Personnel and Accounts 

George Harley - Chief Clerk - Bureau Head 
R. A. Davis - Principal Clerk 

Reproduction 

Edward Fund is - Reproduction Manager - Bureau Head 

Shops 

A. M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau Head 
E. R. Rames - Assistant Superintendent of City Shops 

SEPARATIONS: Retirements 



Ret i red 


















Approx. 


Years 




Name 


Pos i t i on 


Ci 


ity 


Service 


Date 


Conway, Thomas F. 


Purchaser of Supplies 






38 




4- 1-72 


Harley, George H. 


Chief Clerk 






34 




6-28-72 


Col 1 ins, John J . 


Senior Storekeeper 






17 




6- 1-72 


Jones, Harold R. 


Storekeeper 






32 




12- 1-71 


Scul ly, John F. 


Automotive Machinist 






25 




12- 1-71 


Al len, Eugene K. 


Automotive Serviceman 






25 




1- 1-72 


McCarthy, James P. 


Assistant Storekeeper 






23 




2- 5-72 


Gal lagher, Marti n 


Storekeeper 






15 




3-24-72 


Kearny, Edward F. 


Automotive Machinist 
WORK ACCOMPLISHED 






29 




6-29-72 



The work accomplished in the fiscal year is described in more detail 
under the separate bureaus. 

Recapitulation is as follows: 



Bureau 




Unit 


1970-1971 


1971-1972 


Buy i ng 




Purchase Orders 
Amount 


$ 37,769 
24,672,399 


$ 38,148 
25,427,978 






Encumbrance Requests 
Amount 


$33,354,320 


$37,860,397 






Contract Certifications 
Amount 




$ 3,1 16,223 


Stores & 
Equipment 


Surplus Sales - Amount 
Major Stores Operated 


$ 67,930 
1 1 


$ 36,048 
1 1 



- 2 - 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant 



http://archive.org/details/annualreporttoma197178san 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED (Continued) 



Bureau 
Shops 

Reproduction 



Unit 

Job Orders 
Expenditures 

Services rendered 
Amount 



970-1971 



207,564 



1971-1972 



8,496 $ 8,750 
1,589,839 1,621,020 



207,000 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau, procures materials and supplies, equipment and insurance 
and contracts for services, for all city departments, the San Francisco 
Unified School District and the San Francisco Community College. Except 
for term contracts based on estimated quantities, all buying starts with 
receipt of requisition from using department. Included in or incidental 
to the procurement function are the following: (outlined in detail in a 
previous report). 

I . Buying - Bids and Awards 

Preparation of bids, including contractual - and technical 
requirements; evaluation of bids; and award of bids. 

I I . Buying - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of 
specification file; new term contracts; and review 
of procedures. 

PERSONNEL 

The buying division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing 
and Services and includes II assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, 
under the Bureau of Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, mailing, 
opening and tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, 
and typing contracts. Funds for some of these employments, both buying and 
clerical, are provided by other departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

1 - Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 

2 - Senior Purchasers 
7 - Purchasers 

2 - Purchasers (Printing) 
I - Assistant Purchaser 



OPERATIONS 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for 
items of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation 
period make it advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant 
purchasers informed as to the overall progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible 
but delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished 
with requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions 
promptly for equipment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes 
of standardization and economy. 

In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish in- 
formation that will indicate a standard of overall quality and usefulness 
suitable for actual use requirements and permit competition as required 
by the Charter and Administrative Code. A new form was devised for this 
purpose making it easier for departments to furnish desirable information 
for bid purposes. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services where 
desi rab le. 

The need for a separate section to expand the above services is 
apparent if the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform 
its purchasing functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent 
basis as time is available. Every effort should be made to procure a 
full-time employment for this work. 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various 
service and commodities in general use by several departments or 
recurring use by a department. The main advantages are elimination of 
the time lag resulting when individual bids are requested and elimination 
of the cost involved in individual bids. Term contracts must be 
periodically revised and specifications up-dated. New items are added as 
requi red. 

Major purchases included the following: 

Purchases of Bricks, Tree Grate Assemblies, Traffic Signal 
equipment, street signs and street lighting for Market Street 
reconstruction. 



- 4 - 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 

George Harley - Chief Clerk 
Robert Davis - Principal Clerk 

Travel ing 

Requisitions: Monthly Repetitive Purchase Orders are processed in 
quantity on a repeat basis. These are large numbers 
of requisitions as used by Public Health, Public 
Utilities, Public Works, Purchasing, Recreation and 
Park, Schools, Sheriff, Library, Controller, and 
S . F . Commu n i ty Co I I ege . 

Purchase 

Orders: Purchase Orders are prepared by a xerox process directly 

from the Requisition, thus assuring accuracy and speed 

of processing. 

Tabulation 

of Bids: Bid Tabulations are microfilmed. 

Requisition 

Register: Cumulative runs of this register are made daily, weekly 

and monthly and are indispensable in locating requisitions 

processed for purchase order. 

Vendor Index: Continual. 

Codes on 

Purchase Orders: Use of Vendor Location Code, Buyer Code, and Commodity 
Code continual . 

Bid Index: Continual. 



The number of purchase orders to be prepared is not constant, chiefly 
due to the fact that requisitions do not flow into the department in a 
uniform manner. Consequently, there are times when a high production may 
be desired when personnel is depleted by vacations (which cannot be spread 
over the normal vacation period due to conditions beyond our control) 
sickness, or otherwise. Our very limited temporary funds must be used in 
even more critical areas and at more critical times. 

Sales of Charters, Codes and other documents amounted to $17,411.00. 

Discounts earned amounted to $69,486.54. 



CODING DIVISION 



The Coding Division, under the Bureau of Buying, continues the 
development of the material and supplies coding system. The system 
is now in use, by all reguisitioning departments. 

The up-dating of the Railway's stock control system, has brought 

about the need for hundreds of new code numbers. Our section is 

constantly feeding these newly researched item identification numbers 
to their store-room offices. 

At present, we are cooperating with the County of Sacramento, in 
an effort to intermingle our coding systems. We are developing 
hundreds of new code numbers that will bring this about. 

We have developed and up-dated a listing of the many types of 
lamps used by the city departments. The list gives the code numbers 
and the manufacturers part numbers. All concerned departments were 
issued I ists. 

Due to the many reguestsfor new code numbers, and cancellations 
of certain codes by departments, constant changes are being made. 
The departments affected by these changes are notified. 

Personnel from private and governmental offices continue to show 
interest in the Purchaser's Coding System. We welcome their visits 
and the exchanging of ideas. 

At our reguest, departments continue to send personnel for 
instruction, in coding procedures. With the constant changing in 
department personnel, this action is necessary. 



- 6 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 



The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a 
central warphouse and storerooms in various City Departments; receives 
and issues materials, supplies and equipment for all departments of the 
City and County of San Francisco. This Bureau arranges for the sale of 
and sells surplus and obsolete personal property belonging to the City; 
exchanges equipment between departments, maintains a perpetual inventory 
of all materials purchased for the City and County of San Francisco, 
and makes periodic checks of such property. The Bureau maintains control 
of the entire automotive fleet, including the listing, insurance and the 
reporting of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the 
Bureau of Stores and Equipment: 

Name and Location Type Amount of Inventory 

Central Warehouse - 15th & Harrison Sts. Stationery 10,382.5? 

Janitorial Supplies 5,Ol7« n 9 
i+000 Cases Foodstuffs 
Misc. Furniture 
Pipe, etc. 

Dept. Public Works - 2323 Army St. 1?*+, 533-83 

Water Department - 1990 Newcomb Ave. 60 i +,3 i +8.2U 

Hetch Hetchy - Moccasin, Calif. 52,806.39 

3.F. Intl. Airport - So. San Francisco 30* 58^+ .20 

Municipal Railway - 2*+th & Utah Sts. and 252,6o8.U1 

2 sub-stores 

General Stores ) 

Washington & Mason ) 33^+, 10^+. 55 

Potrero and one sub-store 121,^81.79 

Health Dept. - S. F. General Hospital, 2 10,056.36 

22nd. & Potrero 

Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dewey 392,273-89 

Recreation & Park - Golden Gate Park 3^,8^7.35 

Dept. Electricity - 901 Rankin St. 70,001 .A 1 

Sheriff - 88,961.86 

Central Shop Store - Hal 1 of Justice Garage (Sub-Store) ^0,90^.71 

* Storare only - Amount included with departmental inventory 



7 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division is staffed by the 
f ol 1 owing : 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

11 Senior Storekeepers 

20 Storekeeper? (plus 1 Storekeeper on work order) 
8 Assistant Storekeepers 
1 Laborer 
TOTAL 5S 



SALES DIVISION 

Thirteen sales were conducted during the fiscal year under 
the authority of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included 
legal research into various aspects of different sales, preparation of 
sales, inviting interested buyers to bid, opening and awarding of bids, 
collecting and depositing all money received from buyers with the 
City Treasurer and keeping records of correspondence relative to the 
sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of 1971-72 was: $36,0^7.71 

A general breakdown of the sales is as follows: 

Floodlights $1,266.00 

Hydro Generators 750.00 

Fire Hose 2,321.1*8 

Cars - Trucks 17,699.16 

Law Books U2U.10 

Scrap Metal and Iron 8,259.10 

City Directories I58.25 

X-Ray Film 2,332.12 

Street Car Parts I8U.63 

Saddles, etc. 168. 80 

Sacks and Containers 272.69 

IBM Cards, Waste - Paper 988.87 

Grease and Bones 1,203.51 

Miscellaneous 19.00 



- 8 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



INVENTORY DIVISION: 

This division has the assignment of maintaining the Equipment 
inventory of all City Departments; the investigation and report? to the 
Board of Supervisors on lost, damaged, or stolen items of equipment. 
During the fiscal year, a few of the Departments surveyed were: 
District Attorney, Treasurer, Public Administrator, Municipal Court, 
and Health Service System. A complete physical checl-' of eqcipment 
and the Perpetual Inventory records updated on the above mentioned 
departments . 

During the fiscal year, we estimated or secured estimates from 
moving concerns for various moves required by City Departments or Agents, 
We recommend procedure, confer and set the dates and requirements for 
moving or other liaison detail. 

The accumulation of various Waste materials, such as, Waste paper 
(office records), Tab Cards (I.B.M.), X-Ray film, and miscellaneous 
scrap metal is gathered up by this Division for arrangement of disposal 
by sale. Surplus furniture and equipment that has further use is made 
available to other City Departments by transfer. 



- 9 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



STORES DIVISION 

The past fiscal year personnel Classification Changes are as 
follows: Two 1932 Assistant Storekeepers Limited Tenure, Jack Nei 1 1 and 
Walter Zahrt, left the stores division to accept permanent calls with 
the Department of Education. Gerald Connors, a permanent 193? Assistant 
Storekeeper, relinquished to accept a promotion to another department. 

Five 1932 Assistant Storekeeper Limited Tenure positions were 
filled by men selected and assigned to us by Civil Service, and sent to 
the following locations. Louis Hronis, Antonio Coronado and Ernest Klein 
were assigned to the storeroom at San Francisco General Hospital; and 
Alphonso Clark and Randall Bloom, were assigned to the Muni storeroom at 
2i*th. and Utah Streets. 

Three of our permanent 193? Assistant Storekeepers w>re given 
193*+ Storekeeper limited tenure apoointments as follows: Salvador Sanchez, 
to 2l+th. and Utah Streets, Herbert Chatmon to the ^-'ater Department, and 
Charlie Barnes to the Purchasing Department Central Warehouse. 

Civil Service tests for 1932 Assistant Storekeeper and 193*+ 
Storekeeper will be held in the near future to provide permanent calls for 
positions now being occupied by Limited Tenure appointees. 

A very efficient 193*+ Storekeeper, Bill Spence, left the store- 
room at San Francisco International Airport to accept a promotional posi- 
tion as a Senior Materials Supplies Supervisor for the Department of 
Public Works. 

We lost a number of very capable veteran employees through 
retirement. John Collins, a 1936 Senior Storekeeper, retired from the 
Central Warehouse. Also Bert Clarke, a 193*+ Storekeeper from the Presidio 
Storeroom of the Muni Railway, James McCarthy, a 193*+ Storekeeper from the 
Water Department Storeroom, Martin Gallagher, a 193*+ Storekeeper from the 
Potrero Storeroom of the Muni Railway, and Harold Jones, a 193*+ Store- 
keeper from the Recreation and Park Department storeroom retired. 

Work is progressing on the new San Francisco General Hospital 
which will include new storeroom facilities. 

Plans are going ahead for the new facility of the Muni Railway 
for automotive and machine shops which will include consolidation of several 
existing storerooms at the Twenty Second and Indiana Streets location. 

Safety literature, advice and suggestions were relayed to the 
Storekeeping personnel, on a continuing basis at the various storerooms 
of the Bureau of Stores and Equipment of the Purchasing Department. 



- 10 - 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Reproduction Bureau provides a centralized service 
available to all City Departments for photography, offset 
printing, mimeographing, photostatting, blueprinting, micro- 
filming and self-service copiers. 

Funds to operate the Bureau are provided by Work Orders 
from over 70 departments that make use of the Bureau's 
facilities. Work done for City Departments during 1971-72 
amounted to $207,000. 



Major Functions of the Bureau 

We photograph people, places and events. The greater 
part of our photography is to record construction progress 
of City buildings and highway work. 

We mimeograph reports, forms, and calendars with 90% of 
the jobs finished within one day. 

We photo-offset forms, booklets and reports. The addition 
(October 1971) of a 17 x 22 offset press has greatly in- 
creased our production capacity. 70% of our offset jobs 
are completed within two days. 

The 1971-72 mimeo and offset production increased 20% over 
1970-71. 

We make wet blueprints and dry (ammonia) prints up to 42" 
wide, largely for architectural use. 

We microfilm documents on 16mm and 35mm film for record 
keeping, and for reproduction on our 1824 Xerox. 

We make photostat copies up to 18" x 24". 

We provide self-service copiers in Room 50, City Hall and 
in Room 302, 450 McAllister Street. 

The work we mimeograph or offset is often collated, folded, 
stitched or cut to size. 

The process of establishing standard charges for recurring 
jobs is a continuing one. It is made difficult by the fact 
that there are certain minimum costs. When the volume of 
work falls below a certain level, we cannot recover those 
costs without excessive Departmental charges. Our overall 
capacity is at present sufficient to handle quite a bit 
more work, provided that departments plan ahead to give us 
enough time. 



-II- 



CENTRAL SHCPS 1 ANNUAL REPC^T 

PAGE NUMBER ITEM 

1 BUREAU OF SHOPS 

2 ACCOUNTING 

3_i+-5-6 FIRE SHOP 

7-8. TRUCK SHOP 

9-10 AUTO SHOP 

11-12 MACHINE SHCF 

13-14 REC & FARK SHOP 

15-16 HALL CF JUSTICE STATION 

17 CONCLUSION 

18 VEHICLE INVENTORY 

19 CRGmN I ZATICNAL CHART 

20..... EXPENDITURE STATEMENT 

21 EXPENDITURE PIE CHmRT 



PHCTCS 

1) POLICE CAR 

2) GANG MOWERS 

3) SPRAY TRUCK 

k) FIRE DEPARTMENT WATER RESCUE UNIT 



O 3J 
- C 
H 2 




BUREAU OF SHOPS 

The Central Shops, and allied facilities, provide necessary 
mechanical maintenance and repair service for all cltv departments 

, ..<• rvrrnr C , r. , ./- I I -r . . ._..-_ 



ano Bureaus, except Public Utilities. 



In adoition, it is the responsibility of the Bureau to inspect, 
appraise, and make recommendations on all City owned vehicles contem- 
plated for replacement; aid the various departments IN THE WRITING of 

VARIOUS SPECIFICATIONS; AND TO RECEIVE ANO APPROVE ALL NEW VEHICLES 
DELIVERED TO THE ClTY AND COUNTY OF San FRANCISCO. 



Administration and major repa 
Central Shops, 800 Quint Street. 



r facilities are located at the 



Other installations are: Golden Gate Park Shop, providing maint- 
enance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; hall of Justice 
Service Station, where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police and 
other City cars, along with inspection and lk.ht maintenance for Police 
vehicles. Department of Public Vvorks, Army Street Yard where fuels, 
lubricants, and preventive maintenance inspection is provided public 
Works vehicles. 19^ Avenue Public Works Station, Health Department 
Garage, and Department of Electricity Garage. 

The Administration of the Shops, under the Purchaser of Supplies, 
is the oirect responsibility of mr . albert m. flaherty, general super- 
INTENDENT, aided by Mr. Edmond A. Rames, City Shops Assistant Superin- 
tendent. 

The Central Shops, Quint Street operation, has four main maint- 
enance Shop areas. They are 1) Automobile, 2) Truck, 3) Fire Apparatus, 
k) Machine; and the following auxilliary shops: Blacksmith, Pattern and 
Ladder Shop, Paint, Hose Upholstery, Body and Fender, Tire, and Service 
Stat i on . 

Along with the responsibilities for the maintenance anc repair of 
mechanical equipment and school buildings, sewage plants, pumping 
stations, public buildings, etc., the Shops maintains 2^86 motorized 
units of the City owned fleet, an increase of 78 over the fiscal year 
1970-71. These vehicles ano machines are valued at approximately 



The Bureau is staffed with 101 employees. No additional per- 
manent EMPLOYEES HAVE BEEN ADDED THESE PAST SEVERAL YEARS, THOUGH THE 

Work Order system of financing permits us to obtain temporary employ- 
ments FOR SEASONAL OR "AS NEE0ED m PROJECT COMPLETION. 



- |3 - 



ACCOUNTING AND CLERICAL SECTION 

a rather compact sizeo office staff functions under the direction of 
Edward Stone, Senior Management Assistant. It consists of a Senior Account 
Clerk, an Account Clerk, a Clerk-Typist and a Time-roll preparer. 

Our dominant accounting responsibility is to keep shops expenditures 
within the confines of interdepartmental work order funding. while the 
annual appropriation ordinances delineates a central shops budget, it is 
actually "open-end" in nature since there are no off-setting appropriations 

TO BALANCE THE FINANCIAL EQUATION. ThE BuREAU IS ONC OF TWO "PILOT" DEPART- 
ments throughout the clty which are funded purely 3 v work order requests. 
Thus, expenditure control is the sole province of th: Shops' accounting staff, 

1971-72 witnessed an extended usage of the Central Ja ta F-ciCESsing 
facility. However, lack of funds contributed to serious curtailments of a 
project whereby the computer could furnish immediate data on acc'jmul» ted 
vehicle costs and various critical areas of automotive repairs and parts re- 
placemlnts. 

The Office personnel maintains a continuous cost control over individual 
departmental repair expenditures, prepares the annual shops budget and main- 
tains a directory of equipment under maintenance, some 2 , k 1 7 separate units. 

|t may be of worth to comment that in 1971-72, central ^hops was funded 
on figures based on prior year work order contributions. 

Strengthening the economic squeeze, was the fact that no department was 
granted supplemental budgetary funds for automotive maintenance services. 

Nevertheless, the Shops' accounting books showed it to be financially 
solvent at year's end. 



- |4 - 



FIRE APPARATUS SHCP 

The Fire Shop is staffed with eight Automotive Machinists, two Pattern 
Makers, one Blacksmith, two Metalsmiths, one Upholsterer, three Fainters, 
one Body and Fender Man, and one Automotive Serviceman. 

Two Foremen, Mr. Len Counihan ano Mr. Ray Monti, oversee and control 
the maintenance and repair of all apparatus and equipment used by our flre 
Fighting Force. 

This Shop processed a total of 1,0^0 major jobs through the various 
work areas for the year. 723 units of fire apparatus were repaire0 and re- 
turned to service. 

The field service man responded to 3,079 service calls and completed 
1,922 repairs in the fire houses without necessitating the apparatus being 
out of service for any appreciable perioo of time. 

Shop personnel responded to 133 battery service calls in the field and 
serviced and lubricated 261 units of fire apparatus in the shop, 

Three aerial tractors were modernized ano repowered with 6-71 Detroit 

Ol ESEL EnG INES . 

One surplus van truck was rebuilt and converted into a Water Rescue 
Unit for the San Francisco Fire Department Scuba Team. 

Three new (replacement) triple combination Pumpers were outfitted and 
placed in service. 

With the cooperation of the San Francisco Fire Department, the Rec- 
reation and Park Department and Holly Park Neighborhood Association, the 
Central Shops converted a surplus ut-of-ser v i ce fire apparatus into a play- 
ground device for the neighborhood children. 

The antique fire truck was "child proofed", repainted, and outfitted 
with climbing ladders and a slide ano, finally, permanently installed in the 



- I 5 



FIRE APFARATUS SHOP CCNT'D 
PAGE TWO 

PARK SO THAT THE YOUNGSTERS MIGHT IN FANTASY "DRIVE THE HUGE FIRE APPARATUS 
THROUGH THE STREETS OF SAN FrANCISCO 1 '. 

Included in the total jobs completed for the Fire Department were: 

*\h Major engine overhauls 

1^+8 Minor engine overhauls and/or repairs 

135 Fire pump and gate repairs 

k Major pump overhauls 

kZ Small engine repairs 

91 Chass is repa i rs 

kZ Trans overhauls 

39 Radiator repairs 

87 Tune ups 

kZ Special road calls 

ZkO Electrical repairs 

18 Steering gear overhauls 

32 Wheel alignments 

2^1 Various brake jobs and brake-related repairs 

27 Aerial repairs 

k Pieces of apparatus cannibalized 

BLACKSMITH SHOP 

This shop, which is staffed by 1 Blacksmith and 2 Me talsm i ths , manu- 
factured, repaired and/or sharpened tools, apparatus equipment, hangers and 
brackets and heavy metal fittings. 

Manufactured and/or repaired equipment for High Pressure pumping stations, 
high pressure system and sewage plants. During the fiscal 1971-72 this shop 
manufactured kc protective screens to be installed in new police cars. 



PAINT SHOP 

Along with routine spot painting and partial painting of apparatus, 
this shop painted k complete paint jobs on the h|gh pressure vehicle; 500 
oxygen tanks were painted on a continuing function; 250 minor paint jobs 



|6 - 



PAINT SHCF CONT'D 

INCLUDING GOLD LEAF AND LETTERING. This SHOP ALSO COMPLETED THE RE- 
NUMBERING OF 195 CANVAS COVERS AND APPARATUS EQUIPMENT. 

PATTERN SHOP 

This shop is staffed by two (2) Fattesn Makers. They manufactured 

6 24' STRAIGHT LADDERS AND 3 ROOFING LADDERS. They REPAIRED 1C £ LADDERS 
OF ALL SIZES, MANUFACTURED AN EXTREMELY INTRICATE PATTERN FOR A PUMP 
IMPELLER FOR THE WEST END SEWER REDUCTION PLANT. ^URING THE 1971-72 FISCAL 
YEAR, THIS SHOP MANUFACTURED A PATTERN FOR A 2 1/2 FT. DIAMETER PIFE FLANGE 
FOR THE SOUTH EAST SEWAGE PLANT, MADE ONE 3" COUPLING FOR THE LOW PRESSURE 
HYDRANTS AND MADE MANY LADDER SAFETY INSPECTIONS AT FIRE HOUSES; ALONG 
WITH DAILY SMALL JOBS OF MAKING WHEEL CHOCKS, WEDGES AND PATTERN REPAIRS, 
APPARATUS A PPE R TEN AN CES , AN D BRACKETS ANO EQUIPMENT THAT WOULD BE MADE AMD 
REPAIRED IN A PATTERN AND WOODWORKING SHOP. 

BODY AND FENDER REPAIRS (FIRE AFPARhTUS) 

This AREA |S STAFFED WITH ONE (1) BODY AND FENDER MAN WHO COMPLETEO 
H-0 MAJOR BODY REPAIRS. CONTINUAL CAMPAIGN OF REPAIRING SMALL BODY DAMAGES 
(l.E. FENDERS, RUNNING BOARDS, REAR STEPS AND THE VARIOUS BRACKETS ON THE 
A PPARATUS) . 

UPHOLSTERY SHCF 

This shop is staffed by one Upholsterer. For the Fire Shop he made 

SUBSTANTIAL REPAIRS, OR RE-UPHOLSTERED, kj) SEAT CUSHIONS ON VARIOUS FlRE 

Department apparatus. For the Truck Shop he repaired, or re-upholstered, 32 

SEAT CUSHIONS FOR AMBULANCES, POLICE DEPARTMENT PADDY WAGONS AND DEFARTMENT 



_ 17 _ 



UPH O LSTERY SHOP CONT'D 

of Public Works vehicles. He also manufactured and installed a ppro x i rA te l y 
^c securing straps in ambulances. 

For the Passenger Car shop, the upholsterer repaired 12 Police car seats, 
which had incurred broken springs and/or frame damage; pewi-ormed 8c hcurs 
repair wopk on miscellaneous items such as floor carpus or mats, damaged 
door panels, gun rack fads and related work. 

During the fiscal year 1971-72 this shop equipped 3 new Triple Combina- 
tion Pumper apparatus for the Fire Department, making and installing water- 
proof covers, 18 leather and web STRAPS, FELT AM) rubber pais and axe tip 
guards as needed for each to Fire Department specifications. T.-hs Shop also 
manufactured 100 2-part leather Fire Department hose and ladder strap comb- 
inations; 100 1"/j" X 7' web Fire Department small line, straps and made major 
repairs to kk canvas Fire Oefar-ment clean-up stretchers. Made 2y cai.vas ^ags 
as required by the flre department, repaired and/or manufactured 55 flre 
Department truckman's and Officer's flashlight belts ; ^7 H.palon waterfroof 
covers for Fire Department equipment; and manufactured approximately 100 neo- 
prene gaskets amd diaphragms when difficult or impossible tc otherwise obtain. 
Manufactured approximately 2CC various lether or web straps not previously 

LISTED, AND PERFORMED HUNDREOS OF SMALL JOBS OF THE 5 TO 30 MINUTE VARIETY AND, 
THEREFORE, NOT SUBJECT TO LISTING ON INDIVIDUAL JOB CARD WDRK ORDERS. 



_ 18 



TRUCK 5HCP - HEAVY DUTY SHCF 

The Truck Shop (Heavy Duty) is responsible for the maintenance 
and repair of the larger clty owned vehicles such as 1c wheel trucks, 
vans, tank wagons, mechanical sweepers, tractors, road and paving 
machines, fork lifts and crane mounted vehicles; sewer repair and 
general construction equipment including compressors, back hoes, pave- 
ment saws, core drillers and various types of vehicle mounted pumps. 

The work involved here ranges from mino.< preventive maintenance 
through major rebuilding of engines, bodies, chassis members, hydraulic 
systems and the related special equipment which is mounted on these 
various and specialized vehicles. 

The Heavy Duty Shop is staffed by one Foreman, Mr . Anthony Del 
Negro, ten Automotive Machinists, anj six automotive Servicemen. 

During the year this section of the Central Shops performed 1,c65 
jobs which included repairs, rebuilding and modifications to trucks and 
heavy duty specialty equipment. 

a major project was the engineering and redesign of the interior 
mechanism of street sweepers so that they might operate more eff iciemly 
and for longer periods between necessary overhauls. 

A GENERAL RESUME OF JOBS COMPLETED BY THE TFUCK ShOP DURING THE 

year |s as follows : 

27 Engines completely rebuilt 

15 Engines overhauled 

164 Brake systems overhauled 

37 Radiator and cooling systems overhauled 

kZ Body reconstruction jobs (accidents) 

125 Starters rebuilt 

148 Alternators /generators rebuilt 

62 Regulators rebuilt 

72 Carburetors rebuilt 

In addtion the Truck Shop, through its supervisory staff, is 



- |9 - 



TRUCK SHOP - HEAVY DUTY SHOP CONT'D 
PaGE TWO 



RESPONSIBLE FOR THE OPERATIONS AT FOUR OTHER SUB-SHOPS AS FOLLOWS 



QU INT STREET GAS STATION 
Gasoline dispensed 
Oil dispensed 

Vehicles lubricated 

19a AVENUE GAS STATION 
Gasoline dispensed 
Oil disfensed 
Vehicles lubricated 



1^8,366 GALLONS 
11,200 QUARTS 

1,6^8 



50,^05 GALLONS 
1,780 QUARTS 

98 



^UINT STREET T IRE SHOP 

new tires mounted and re-caps mounted 2,032 

t i res repa i red 519 

Road calls (Tire Services) 312 



DEFT. CF ELECTRICITY (GARAGE ) 
Lubes and services 
Road calls (Tires, stalls, etc) 



203 

^7 



ARMY STREET (DPW YARD) STATION: 

This service facility is located in the D.P. W. maintenance yard 
at 2323 Army Street. 

Its function is to provide minor maintenance and repairs, prevent- 
ive MAINTENANCE AND FUELS AND LUBRICANTS TC THE FLEET OF THE DEPARTMENT 

of Public Works automotive equipment units. Services are available 
from 7:00 A.M. to Midnight, five (5) ° AYS PER week. 

The stat. on is staffed with one Automotive Machinist, four Automotive 
Servicemen and one Sub-Foreman, Mr. E lmer Bryoen. 

The fiscal year saw 2,856 various repair and service jobs completed. 



296,957 gallons of gasoline we. 



dispensed along with 2,^+72 gallons of 



KEROSENE AND 3 , 060 GALLONS OF LUBE OIL, 



20 - 



AUTOMOTIVE SHOP 

The AuTcnonvE Shop is staffed with seven automotive mechanics, 

TWO AUTOMOTIVE SERVICEMEN, ANO ONE AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC - FOREMAN, Mr, 

Eo Franke. 

This shop is responsible for the repair and maintenance of 1,236 

City owned vehicles which include both passen^lR cars ano light trucks to 

3/4 ton capacity. Other vehicles maintained by this shop are 2C leased 

CARS, 8 THREE WHEEL TRAFFIC CONTROL MOTORCYCLES, AND 1c HONDA TPAIL 90 
SOLC BIKES, ALL ASSIGNED TO THE San FRANCISCO FlRE DEPARTMENT. 

New vehicles outfitted for service this year included 46 Police 
Slack and White cars, 17 Police undercover cars, 41 vehicles for various 
other City departments, along with 45 units received, inspected and 
delivered to various Public Utilities Bureaus and the Fort of San 
Franc isco. 

The Automotive Shop maintains its license as an official headlamp 
adjusting station and official motor vehicle pollution control device 
installation and inspection station fop inspecting and issuing smog 
certificates for any department needing them. 

With limited vehicle replacement the number of completed jobs has 
risen by 564 this year bringing the total to 3*720. 

a listing of completed work include s 6 1 5 brake jobs and safety 
inspection of drums and disc brake rotors, wheel cylinders ano hydkaulic 
lines. 770 tune-ups were completed and tested with our sun llectrcnic 

TESTER FOR TOP ENGINE PERFORMANCE. 67 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS WERE 
SERVICED AND ADJUSTED. 103 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS WERE COMPLETELY 
OVERHAULED WITH FACTORY PARTS AND ADJUSTED TO FACTORY SPECIFICATIONS. 



21 



MACHINE SHOP 

The complement of the Machine Shop comprises 9 Maintenance Machinists, 
and one Maintenance Machinist Foreman, John J. Raos. 

The function of the Machine Shop is to repair, reconstruct, and 
maintain all machinery, tcols, ano equipment in all City departments 
including the Board of Education. 

During the year 1971-72 a total of 739 jobs were processed in 
this segment of Central Shops. 

The Machine Shop services all the tools and machinery of the 
Industrial Arts section of the secondary schools and High Schools 
throughout the City. This shop also services the heating system, 
Machinery pumps, fans, and blowers of all these schools. 

The Fire Department high-pressure system requires the services of 
the Machine Shop in oroer to repair the pumping machinery in the two 
high-pressure water pumping stations, as well as the manufacturing, 
and the repairing, of parts for fire hydrants throughout the clty. 

The sewer treatment plants North Point, R i chmond-Sunset , and the 
South-East Plant are serviced by k Maintenance Machinists under the super- 
vision of the Machine Shop Foreman. 

The men assigned to these plants service ano rebuild parts for 
pumping machinery, blowers, filters, driers, and other related equipment. 

The sewage pumping plants, of which there are 12, consist of pump- 
ing MACHINERY, HYDRAULIC VALVES, AND CIRCULATING PUMPS WHICH ARE KEPT 

in repair by the machine shop. 

The Recreation ano Park Department requires the services of the 



23 - 



MACHINE SHOP CONT'D 

Machine Shop in keeping in repair the pumping and sewer treatment equip- 
ment in the Golce.m Gate Park Treatment plant; also thl irrigation pumps, 
the ^err v-go-rouno at the Children's playground, and the sewage pumps 
located throughout the Zoo compound. 

The Hose Shop, a sub-section of the Machine Shop, is required to 
inspect, repair and distribute all the hose in the Fire Department. 

During the fiscal year 1971-72 ^8,000 feet of new hcse was re- 
ceived, labeled, ano distributed to the various companies of the Fire 
Department. 20,000 feet of in-service fire hose was repaired and tested 

BY THIS SUB-SECTION CF THE MACHINE ShOP. 



24 



V 



RECREATION AND PARK SHCP 

The Golden Gate Park repair shop, located at 3rd Avenue and South 
Drive, is staffed with 3 Automotive Machinists and one Automotive Service- 
man, SUPERVISED BY AUTOMOTIVE MACHINIST FOREMAN JAMES T. ELLIOT. CnE 

additional Automotive Machinist was employed tempor ar i ll y . 

During 1971-72, 1,386 repair orders were written including the 
following major repairs: 

The complete overhaul of 2 Toro Parkmaster mowers including engine 
and all mower unit lifting mechanisms; along with a complete paint job. 

A complete engine overhaul of a Case Bucket Loader; an engine and 
running gear overhaul on a national triplex mowerj the reconstruction of 
the frame ano pivot and brake system on a tractor tllt trailer; and an 
engine rebuilt in an international flat bed truck. 

the differential of a ford 10 wheel dump truck was overhauled; and 
15 Spartan (Toro) cutting units were completely overhauled and rebuilt. 

Close to the end of the fiscal year there was a back-log of work on 
older, worn out, equipment without funds available to initiate repairs. 

The Recreation and Park Department provided sufficient extra funds 
to overhaul and repair a 1956 insecticioe spray truck along with required 
engine rebuilds on four high mileage pickup trucks and two large toro 
Mower Tractors. 

Though this extra production proved to be of assistance to the opera- 
ting DEPARTMENT, WE STILL MUST CONTEND WITH AN EXCESS OP REC AND Park 
EQUIPMENT OUT OF SERVICE IN THE PROCESS OF REPAIRS. ThIS COMES ABOUT 
BECAUSE OF THE CONSTANT AND SEVERE WORK LOAD ON THE EQUIPMENT, NO REPLACE- 
MENT PROGRAM, AND SEVERELY LIMITED REPAIR FUNDS. ThIS PROBLEM HAS BELN A 



25 



recreation k park cont'd. 

Page two 

matter of discussion with all concerneo for several yzars. it is hop£d 
that the near future might see it resolved. 

This shop dispensed 151iOOO gallons of gasoline and 6,971 quarts 
of oil to the Park fleet and other departments, of the City and °ounty 
of San Francisco, during the fiscal year 1971-72. 



- 26 



HALL OF JUSTICE SER V ICE STATION 

This branch of the Central Shops is located on Bryant Street, 
west of the Hall of Justice. It provides fuel and service to Police 
Department vehicles and supplies gasoline and oil tc other City vehicles 
The Station is operated 7 days a week from 7 a .M. to Midnight ano is 
staffed with 8 Automotive Servicemen, 1 Automotive Serviceman Sub- 
Foreman, Mr. Robert Desmond, 2 Automotive Mechanics and one Automotive 
Mechanic Sub-Foreman, Mr. Harry Maker. 

The convenient down-town location and the accelerated useage of 
Police vehicles make this a high volume distribution point of fuel and 
lubricants for City vehicles. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 

Gasoline dispensed 61^,369 gallons 

Oil dispensed 16,05*+ Quarts 

Tow jobs 1 ,530 

Tires changed (new & recap) 1,160 

Batteries serviced (new & charged) 419 

Lube and service jobs 1,85*+ 

Mechanical repairs 7,753 

Brake reline jobs 37 



MOTORCYCLE SERVICE 

LUBED 

Tires changed 
Batter i es 
Repa i rs 



476 
226 
350 
8co 



- 27 - 



HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION (CONT'D) 
PAGE TWO 



A HEAVY OEMANO FOR SERVICE AT THIS STATION, DUE TO THE EXCESSIVE 
MILEAGE OF MANY POLICE CARS, MADE IT NECESSARY TO AOD ONE MECHANIC TO 
THE STATION STAFF. FuNOS WERE PROVIDED FOR THE FINAL THREE MONTH 
PERIOO OF THE FISCAL YEAR. ThIS ADDITIONAL EMPLOYMENT GREATLY INCREAS- 
ED PRODUCTIVITY AND REDUCED POLICE CAR DOWN-TIME. ^UNDS WEPE REQUESTED 
TO CONTINUE THIS ESSENTIAL SERVICE INTO THE 1972-73 FISCAL YEAR BUT WERE 
DEN I ED . 



28 



automct ive shof ccnt' d 
page two 

k& ENGINES REBUILT AND INSTALLED WITH NEW RADIATORS ANO HOLES. 36 
VEHICLES RECEIVEO VALVE GRINDS. 66 RADIATORS WERE REPAIRED. 302 ROAD 
SERVICE CALLS WERE MADE WITH ON-THE-SPOT REPAIRS OR TOWED TO THE SHOP. 
1,132 OTHER JOBS OF MISCELLANEOUS NATURE, SUCH AS REBUILDING OF GENERATORS, 
ALTERNATORS, STARTERS AND CARBURETORS, WERE PERFORMED FOR VARIOUS DEPART- 
MEN TS . 

Accident repairs numbered 312. 10 of thi.se were totaled. By 
Cannibalizing parts from the previous years' turn-ins - and those that 
were totaled, many vehicles involved in accidents, some that might be 
considered totals, were repaired and returned to service at minimum cost. 



22 



CONCLUS ION 



The Fiscal year 1971-72 again saw increased activity by the 
Central Shops with a total of 8,750 job oroers written and com- 
pleted. Additionally 1^,655 minor repairs, field and shop 
services, preventive maintenance inspections, tire repair and 
changes, and battery services were completed. 

The vehicle replacement program continues at a minimum. This 
policy coupled with the freeze on replacement equipment, initia- 
ted during the fiscal year, placeo an unexpected burden on the 
Shops. Motor vehicles that should have been replaced continued 
in precarious service after required repairs. 

the forthcoming fiscal year, with the exception of police autos 
and Fire Department apparatus, offers little improvement. We 
again must look foreward to spiraling operating costs and increas- 
ed down-time as extensive maintenance and repairs are required 
to keep the fleet in acceptable conoition. 

Private industry has recognized that automotive eq ipment has a 
predicteo economic life span. governmental agencies generally 
agree with this concept and have initiated programs of timely 
repl a cement. 

Many cities are coordinating the responsibility for their essen- 
tial IN-SERVICE TRANSPORTATION OPERATION WITHIN A SINGLE BUREAU 
OR DEPARTMENT. ThAT DIVISION ACQUIRES THE VEHICLES AND THEN 

"leases" them to the operating departments for a flat PERIODIC 

FEE THAT WOULD INCLUDE OPERATING EXPENSES AND A DEPRECIATION 
FACTOR. AT THE END OF A PREDETERMINED USEFUL LIFE A RESERVE 
FUND HAS BEEN ACCUMULATED FOR REPLACEMENT. WE SHOULD CONTINUE 
TO INVESTIGATE AND CONSIDER THE ADVANTAGES OF SUCH A POLICY. 



- 29 - 



NUMBERED OF CITY-OWNED VEHICLES BY DEPARTMENT 
PER IBM INVENTORY RUN AS CF JULY 1, 1972 



DEPT 


NO 


. OF 


DEPT 




NO. CF 


NO 


DEPARTMENT VEHICLES 


NO. 


DEPARTMENT 


VEH ICLES 


111 


Adult Prob at i on 


7 


DEPT. OF PUBLIC HEALTH 




115 


Assessor 


2 












2 


513 


Admin istration 


9 


117 


City Attorney 








119 


City Planning 


2 


525.1 


Comm. Disease 


2 


123 




1 


527 


Milk & Dairy Inspect. 


14 


Controller 








131 


S.F. Disaster Corps 


5 


531 


Food & Sanitary Inspect 'l 5 


141 


District Attorney 


5 


535 


Health Centers 
Public h lalth Nursing 


5 


145 




277 


539 


1 


Fire Departmen t 








151 


Mayor 


6 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 


17 


161 


Pol ice Departmen t 


323 


553 


Hassler Hospital 


9 
14 


161N 






555 


Lagun a Honda Hos p. 


Police Lease 


19 








165 
169 






557 


S.F. Gen • l . Hosp. 


10 


Public Defender 
^oc i a l Services 


3 

41 


561 

567 


Mental Aomin, 


2 




S ingle M EN ' s Rehab 


2 


Mental Inst. Service 


3 


170 








173 


Sheriff 


39 








181 
185 
187 
188 




2 

19 

6 








J UPERV ISORS 

Probat ion Officer 


611 


Legion of Honor 


1 


Log Cabin Ran ch 


621 


DeYoung Museum 


1 


Hioden Valley School 


2 


631 




7 








Library 


213 


Calif. Academy Science 


9 


651 


Rec & Park-General 


160 


221 


Chief Adm in . Officer 
Coroner 


2 


651S 


Rec & Park-Services 


322 


223 


5 


661B 


John ' Conn ell 


3 


233 
243 
245 


Dept. of Electricity 


39 


661E 


Shop Trucks 


9 


Public Administrator 


3 


661F 


Gardners Autos, etc 


23 


Real Estate Dept. 


1 


661G 


Delivery Trucks 


13 


255 
261 
265 


Registrar of Voters 


1 
6 


661H 


Aomin istration 


4 


Tax Collector 


66U 


Furniture Deft. 


6 


We i gh ts-Me asures 


10 

4 


669 


City College 


15 


311 


Purc h-Gen . Office 








312 


Purch-Central Shops 
DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Arch I TECTURE 


40 

9 
44 


775 


S.F. Port Commission 


65 


413 
415 


DEPT, 


, OF PUBL IC WORKS (RCAD 


FUND) 


BLDG . I NSPECT I ON 








415.1 


Federal A i 


5 


681 


Street Re fa i r 


100 


417 


Bldg . Repair 


110 


683 


Traffic Engineering 


28 


417.2 


Tra ffic Painting 


27 

28 
2 


686 


Street Tree Planting 


42 


421 


Eng ineer ing 
General Office 








^23 


2265 


424 


Personn el Aomin. 


3 








^25 


Sewage Pumping Sta 


2 




Police Motorcycles 


199 


427 


Sewage Treat. Plants 
Sewer Repair D i v . 


25 
120 




Police Hon das 


18 


429 


GRAND TOTAL 


2486 


431 


Street Cln . Autos 


107 









30 - 



JULY 1, 197: 



CENTRAL SH0F5 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 
800 QUINT STREET 

1 - 7150 General Superintendent or Shops 

1 - 7277 Assistant Superintendent of Shops 

1 - 1844 Senior Management Assistnat 

1 - 1632 Senior Account Clerk 

1 - 1630 Account Clerk 

1 - 1424 Clerk-typist 



TRUCK SHOP 

- 7254 Foreman 

- 7313 Auto Machinist 

- 7410 Auto Serviceman - Truck 

- 741C Auto Serviceman 

- 7410 Auto Serviceman - Station 

TIRE SHOP 

- 7^+ 1 Auto Serviceman 



BODY SHOP 
3 - 7306 Body & Fender Man 

BLACKSMITH SHCP 
3 - 7389 Metalsmi th 
1 - 7305 Blacksmith 

MACHINE SHOP 

1 - 7237 Ma int. Machinist Foreman 

3 - 73^3 Maint. Machinist 

4 - 73^3 Maint. Machinist (Sewage Plant) 

2 - 7343 Maint. Machinist (Schools) 



PASSENGER SHCF 
1 - 7249 Foreman 
7 - 73 81 Auto Mechanic 
1 . 7381 Auto Mechanic (XF) 
1 - 7410 Auto Serviceman 
•1 - 741G Auto Serviceman 
*1 _ 7*4-10 Auto Serviceman (Health 

Garage) 

FIRE SHOP 
1 - 7254 Foreman 
1 - 7315 Sub-Foreman 
7 _ 7313 Auto Machinist 

1 - 7313 Auto Machinist (Field 

Service) 

2 - 74 1C Auto Serviceman 

2 - 7358 Pattern Maker 
1 - 7387 Upholsterer 

3 - 73C9 P* inter 

(1) - 73C9 Pa inter (XF) 
1-01 Chauffeur (Fire HojSe 
Deliveries) 



WATCHMAN 
3 - 7410 Auto Serviceman 

19^ AVENUE STATION 
1 - 7410 Auto Serviceman 



H/.LL OF JUSTICE 

•1 - 7382 SuB-FoREMAN 

2 - 7381 Auto Mechanic 

•1 - ?412 Sub-Foreman 

•8 - 7410 Auto Serviceman 



DEFT. OF ELECTRICITY YARD 
■1 - 7410 Auto Serviceman 

DPW YARD (SERVICE STATION) 
'1 - 741C Auto Serviceman (Da y) 
2 - 7410 Auto Serviceman (Night Gas) 
1 - 741C Auto Serviceman (Night PM) 
1 - 7315 Auto Machinist - Sub-Foreman 
1 - 7315 Auto Machinist 



PARK SHCP 

1 - 7254 Foreman 

3 - 7313 Autc Machinist 

1 _ 7313 A u to Machinist (XF) 

■1 _ 7*+10 Auto Servicekan 



1 - 1936 General Storekeeper 
1 _ 1934 Storekeeper 



*21 Budgeted 
79 WO (Work Order) 
3 (XF) Extra Fund 

103 



- 31 - 



C ENTRAL SHCPS OPERATING EXPENDITURES 

DIRECT CHARGES FOR 1971-72 

COMPARED WITH PRIOR YEAR 



FERSCNAL SERVICES 

administrative salaries 

Crafts employees wages 

Employees retirement contributions 

Social Security Contributions 

Special Work Orders 



1971-72 



S19, 224. 00 

1,014,970.00 

100,493.00 

37,000.00 

197,808.00 



1970-71 



$18,146.00 

920,119.00 

28,037.00 

11,845.00 

167,858.00 



Total 
CONTRACTUAL SERVICES 



i1, 369, 495. 00 $1,146,005.00 
183,980.0 187,182.00 



MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES 



Total Direc Charges 



342,540.00 287,833.00 
31,896,015.00 S1, 621, 020. 00 



FISCAL NOTES 

1. The increase in costs or materials and supplies is attributable to 
the following factors: (l) rlses in market prices of automotive 
parts, accessories and materials; (2) procurement of 322,500.00 of 
low pressure pipe fitting for the f|re department; (3) increase in 
accident repairs and auto re-paint work performed at the shops which 
were formerly done by outside contractors; (4) special flre apparatus 
diesel engine replacements requiring $22,360.00 of new engines and 
accessory parts. 

2. Mandatory fixed charges: Retirement and Social Security Contributions 

WERE COMPLETELY FUNDED BY CLIENT DEPARTMENTS. In THE PRIOR YEAR, 
THESE CHARGES WERE SUBSIDIZED BY OTHER GENERAL ClTY RESOURCES 

AMOUNTING TO 3125,000.00 



- 32 - 



PERCENTAGE OF COST DISTRIBUTION 



CENTRAL SHOPS EXPENDITURES 



FISCAL YEAR 1971-72 




TOTAL EXPENDITURES: 51,896,015.00 



33 - 



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> -I 

n oi 

o o 

O 3 



APPENDIX 



TABLE NO. I 



PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 



General 
Education 
Health 
Utilities 



1970 - 1971 

Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



1971 - 1972 

Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



TOTALS 



15,851 


$ 


9,995,476 


15,448 


$ 


10,956,693 


8,811 




5,764,175 


10,157 




5,085,424 


6,574 




4,326,099 


6,441 




4,437,323 


6,533 


$ 


4,586,649 


6,102 


$ 


4,948,538 


37,769 


24,672,399 


38,148 


25,427,978 



Purchases by 
Encumbrance Requests 



$ 33,354,320 



$ 37,860,397 



Purchases through 
Contract Certification 



$ 3,116,223 



GRAND TOTAL 



$ 66,404,598 



TABLE 2 



EXPENDITURES 



Comparision of expenditures with original budget for all 
appropriations except Personnel Service for 1971-72:- 



Account 



Budgeted & Encumbered 

Supplemented & Expended Surplus Deficit 



Contract Services 
1.311.200.000 



i4-9i4.28 



i;7735 



1693 



Materials & Supplies 
1.311.300.000 



10200 



9963 



237 



Equipment 
1.311.1+00.000 



- - 



- - 



Premium Official Bonds 
1.311.812.000 



6191 



8301+ 



2113 



Premium Auto Insurance 
1*311.813.000 



814.000 



82555 11*45 



Miscellaneous Insurance 
1.311.815.000 



14.31+38 



I4.I3I4.8 2090 



Membership 

1*311.8514-. 000 



856 



826 



30 



Total 



1914.113 



190731 



51+95 



2113 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OP SAN FRANCISCO 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Fiscal Year 1972-73 






September 1973 



ANNUAL REPORT 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and 
contractual services for all departments of the City and County, 
including city-owned utilities, the San Francisco Port Commission, 
the San Francisco Unified School District and the San Francisco 
Community College; repairs and maintains automotive and other equip- 
ment for the various departments, except Public Utilities, and for 
the School District as requested; operates a central reproduction 
bureau for departments requiring its services; transfers to other 
departments for use or sells equipment and supplies no longer useful 
to any department of the city; maintains a perpetual inventory of 
equipment in the various departments; and operates central stores of 
the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by 
the Shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of 
Buying on new products, specifications and prices. 

The Purchasing Department, during the fiscal year 1972-73 expend- 
ed $27,634,550 through Purchase Orders, $^9, 261, 958 through Encum- 
brance Requests and approximately $1,061,552 through Contract 
Certifications for a total of $77,958,060, an increase of $11,315,565 
over the previous year. Sales of Charters, Codes, and other 
documents amounted to $16,9^6.00. 

The output of printing, mimeographing, microfilming, etc. by 
the Reproduction Bureau increased by 19? at only a 10? increase in 
Interdepartmental charges. This was due in part to new equipment, 
but also reflected increased efficiency due to new procedures and 
methods . 

The Bureau of Central Shops furnished maintenance, repair and 
service for 2,512 motorized units of the City owned fleet, an 
increase of 26 units over the previous fiscal year. The total fleet 
is valued at approximately 7.5 million dollars. 

The number of gallons of gasoline dispensed dropped from 
1,261,047 to 1,203,523 reflecting the problem of gasoline shortages 
experienced during the latter part of the fiscal year and the co- 
operation of the various departments in cutting back on the use of 
fuel, wherever possible. 

The Bureau of Central Shops is encountering a problem in main- 
taining repair and service because of the increase in the average 
age of the vehicles in the City fleet. As the vehicles become older, 
they need more and more repair each year. 

- 1 - 



The Bureau of Stores and Equipment staffs the City's major 
storerooms, maintains inventory control of City owned equipment and 
is responsible for the sale of surplus City equipment and supplies. 
Sales of these items amounted to $5^,167.00 during the past fiscal 
year. 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 199 permanent in four bureaus. The Organi- 
zation Chart is shown in the Appendix, 

SUPERVISORY - June 30, 1973 

Administrative 

J. C. Gavin - Purchaser of Supplies 
C. D. Morello - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buying 

R. Tecco - Assistant Director of Purchasing & Services, Bureau 

Head 
R. C. Erickson - Senior Purchaser (Buying Staff) 
G. A. Clarke - Senior Purchaser (S. F. General Hospital) 
G. F. Burket - Senior Purchaser (Specifications & Standardization) 
C. J. Morrissey - Coding Supervisor (Acting) 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. H. Beck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 
J. A. Frantz - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

Personnel and Accounts 

Helen Klein - Chief Clerk - Bureau Head 
Florence White - Principal Clerk 
Peter Pan - Accountant 

Reproduction 

Edward Fundis - Reproduction Manager - Bureau Head 

Shops 

A. M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau 

Head 
E. R. Rames - Assistant Superintendent of City Shops 



- 2 - 



SEPARATIONS: Retirements 



Retired 



Name 



Position 



Clarke, Wilbert J. Storekeeper 
Madison, Cedric M. Purchaser 
Counihan, Leonard 
Sallade, Garth R. 
Kaufman, Helen L 



Auto Machinist Foreman 
Automotive Serviceman 
Senior Clerk 



Righetti, David V. General Laborer 
Arbeit, Adolph Senior Purchaser 



Approx. Years 
City Service 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED 



Date 



27 


7-1-72 


11 


8-1-72 


30+ 


9-15-72 


27 


2-1-73 


11 


3-1-73 


21 


3-1-73 


28 


3-17-73 



The work accomplished in the fiscal year is described in more 
detail under the separate bureaus. 



Recapitulation is as follows 



Bureau 



Buying 



Stores & 

Equipment 



Unit 

Purchase Orders 
Amount 

Encumbrance Requests 
Amount 



1971-72 

; 38,148 
24,672,399 



37, 860,' 397 



Contract Certifications 

Amount 3,116,223 

Surplus Sales - Amount 36,048 

Major Stores Operated 11 



1972-73 

i 35,302 
25,427,978 



49,261,958 



1,061,552 

54,167 
11 



- 3 - 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED (Continued) 

Bureau Unit 1971-1972 1972-1973 

Shops Job Orders 8,750 10,496 

Expenditures $1,621,020 $1,621,020 

Gasoline dispensed 1,261,047 * 1,023,523 gal. 

Reproduction Services rendered 

Amount $ 207,000 $ 246,330 

* Decrease due to gas shortage last 6 months of FY 72-73. 

BUREAU OF BUYING 
The Bureau of Buying, under the supervision of the Assistant 
Director of Purchasing and Services, is responsible for the procurement 
of supplies, equipment, services and insurance for all City departments, 
the San Francisco Unified School District and the San Francisco Com- 
munity College District. As requisitions are received from the various 
City agencies they are converted either directly to purchase orders, as 
in the case of term contract items, or to formal or informal bids by 
the appropriate buyer according to commodity code. Generally, the pro- 
curement functions (outlined in detail in a previous report) is as 
follows: 

I. BUYING - BIDS AND AWARDS 
Evaluation by requisition document to determine type of 
procurement action to be taken; preparation of bids to 
include contractual and technical requirements; analysis 
and award of bids. 

II. BUYING - RELATED FUNCTIONS 
Analysis of records of previous purchases specifically 
related to factors of average use; maintenance of 
individual specification files and library of pertinent 
catalogs and technical data; research on new items; 
preparation of new and review and/or revision of old 

term contracts; and procedural review. 

- H - 



BUYING PERSONNEL 
The buying staff consists of the following personnel: 

1 - Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 
3 - Senior Purchasers 

7 - Purchasers 

2 - Purchasers (Printing) 
1 - Assistant Purchaser 

OPERATIONS 

1. Purchasing workload is assigned to the individual buyer on 
a commodity basis with allowance for items of a special nature or in 
cases where seasonal peaks or vacations make it advisable to deviate 
from this policy. Budget equipment (OE 400 funds) is also spread 
throughout the buying staff to prevent an overload on any particular 
buyer. 

2. Periodic meetings of the buying staff are held to permit 
the exchange of ideas; the formulation of improved operating pro- 
cedures; discussions of mutual problems; review and refinement of 
existing procedures; and in general to keep the staff apprised of the 
City-wide purchasing picture. 

3. Although every effort is made to process requisitions as 
quickly as possible, delays do occur primarily for the following 
reasons : 

a. Constant turnover in Purchasing Department and re- 
quisitioning department personnel. 

b. Necessity for continuous training of personnel because 
of 3a above. 

c. Insufficient information furnished with requisition. 



- 5 - 



d. Lack of promptness by departments in submitting re- 
quirements for annual contracts for timely bidding. 
This also applies for equipment that can be group 
purchased. 

4. In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to 
furnish information that will indicate a standard of overall quality 
and usefulness suitable for actual use requirements, and to permit 
competitive bidding as required by the Charter and Administrative Code. 
The new form devised for this purpose makes it easier for departments 
to furnish desired information for bid purposes. 

5. As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

a. Review specifications, forms, and procedures. 

b. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services 
where desirable. Term contracts added are as follows: 

a. Boots, Uniform, Motorcycle - Police 81550 

b. Cloth, Uniform, Elastique, Polyester & Wool- 
Railway 81050 

c. Floor Finish, Liquid, Water, Emulsion Type 83450 

d. Moving and Storage, Misc. Material - Sheriff 68650 

e. Re-Upholster Furniture - Airport 79800 

f. Reworking Bumpers, Rear, Coach - Railway 72525 

g. Drain Oil Removal Service 70400 
h. Spark Plugs 72000 
i. Shade, Window, Repair & Removal - College 83700 
j . Photographic Supplies 93050 

6. Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for 
various service and commodities in general use by several departments 



- 6 - 



or recurringly used by a department. The main advantages are elim- 
ination of the time lag resulting when individual bids are requested, 
and elimination of the cost involved in individual bids. Term con- 
tracts must be periodically revised and specifications updated. New 
items are added as required. 

7. Major purchases included the following: 

a. Television Lighting in City College 

b. Electric mechanized files - Social Services 

c . Street sweepers - Airport 

d. Tandem rollers - Rec/Park 

e. Radio Communication System - Electricity 

f. CCTV Equipment - Police and City College 

g. Paving Machine - Public Works 
h. Safety shoes - Fire Dept . 

i. Eucalyptus Piles - Port 
j. 1000 HP Electric Motor - Water 
k. Burn treatment unit - Health 
1. Ambulances - Health 

8. The commodity buyer for janitorial supplies is a permanent 
member of a committee for the evaluation of such products. The member- 
ship of the committee is comprised of the supervisors of custodial 
services from all City departments. The committee has been meeting 
monthly since October 1970 and much progress has been made in standar- 
dizing janitorial products. A primary example is in floor finish where 
a term contract has been established and the number of brands used 
throughout the City at any one time has been reduced from fifteen to 
one. A system of extensive testing of all janitorial products has been 
instituted by the committee and interested parties are encouraged to 
submit their products for testing. 

- 7 - 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS 



Helen Klein - Chief Clerk 
Florence White - Principal Clerk 



Traveling 
Requisitions: 



Purchase 
Orders: 



Tabulation 
of Bids: 



Requisition 
Register: 



Vendor Index: 



Codes on 
Purchase Orders: 



Bid Index: 



Monthly Repetitive Purchase Orders are processed 
in quantity on a repeat basis. These are large 
numbers of requisitions as used by Public Health, 
Public Utilities, Public Works, Purchasing, 
Recreation and Park, Schools, Sheriff, Library, 
Controller, and S. F. Community College. 



Purchase orders are prepared by a xerox process 
directly from the Requisition, thus assuring 
accuracy and speed of processing. 



A microfilmed re core 
by Purchasing. 



of all bids received 



Cumulative runs of this register are made daily, 
weekly and monthly and are indispensable in 
locating requisitions processed for purchase 
order. 

An alphabetical listing of purchase orders by 
Vendor kept on a continual basis. 



Use of Vendor Location Code, Buyer Code, and 
Commodity Code continual. 

An informational source document showing all bid 
items on a commodity basis. 



The number of purchase orders to be prepared is not constant, 
chiefly due to the fact that requisitions do not flow Into the 
department in a uniform manner. Consequently, there are times when 
a high production may be desired when personnel is depleted by vaca- 
tions (which cannot be spread over the normal vacation period due 
to conditions beyond our control) sickness, or otherwise. Our very 
limited temporary funds must be used in even more critical areas 
and at more critical times. 

Sales of Charters, Codes and other documents amounted to 
$16,946.00. 

1971-72 1972-73 
Discounts earned amounted to: $69,4tib.54 $»4,577.56 



- G - 



(continued) 



Bureau of Personnel and Accounts (continued) 



The Accounting Section Is responsible for the department 
budget; encumbrance requests for contractual services for general 
office and reproduction; quarterly sales tax returns; monthly 
fuel use tax returns; monthly gas and oil distribution reports; 
processing of inter-departmental work orders; security of counter 
sales funds; departmental revolving fund purchases; departmental 
pay check distribution; and regular accounting duties „ 



- 9 - 



CODING DIVISION 



The Coding Division, under the Bureau of Buying, continues the 
development of the material and supplies identification coding 
system. The system now used by all requisitioning departments. 

Considerable savings to the city in money, material, delivery 
time, and much follow up correspondence, has been realized from 
the inspection, by the coding section, of all incoming requisitions 
for material, supplies and equipment. By checking the Purchaser's 
item identification code number against the item and description, 
discrepancies are discovered in part numbers, sizes, prices, quan- 
tities, etc. These errors are corrected by coding and the involved 
department notified. 

In our system we have a group and class covering the casting of 
various parts used on certain city equipment. We are investigating 
the possibility of react iviating this type of procurement on 
certain items, which could possibly result in a considerable savings 
to the city as well as providing an additional source of supply. 
Involved departments as well as vendors have been notified and are 
assisting in the project. 

Due to the constant change of personnel throughout the city depart- 
ments, we have developed sample requisitions for those new employ- 
ees who will be required to write their department material and 
supplies requisitions. This method, plus our regular instructional 
procedures, will help them considerably. 

Due to the many requests for new code numbers, and the cancellation 
of certain codes by the departments, constant changes and additions 
have been made. The departments affected by these changes have been 
notified. 



- 10 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 



The Burea u of Stores and Equipme 
warehouse and storerooms in various Ci 
materials, supplies and equipment for 
County of San Francisco, This Bureau 
surplus and obsolete personal property 
equipment between departments, maintai 
materials purchased for the City and C 
periodic checks of such property. The 
entire automotive fleet, including the 
of a 1 T accidents. 



nt operates and maintains a central 
ty Departments; receives and issues 
all departments of the City and 
arranges for the sale of and sells 

belonging to the City; exchanges 
ns a perpetual inventory of all 
ounty of San Francisco, and makes 
Bureau maintains control of the 
listing, insurance and the reporting 



The following locations are staffed and operated by the Bureau of 
Stores and Equipments 



Name and Location 



Central Warehouse - 15th & Harrison Sts, 



Type 



Amount of Inventory 



Dept, Public Works 
Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 
S,F, Intl. Airport 
Municipal Rai Iway 



Health Dept, 



Recreation & Park 

Dept, Electricity 

Sheriff 

Central Shop Store 



Stationery 14,300.00 

Janitorial Supplies 4,679.94 
*4000 Cases Foodstuffs 
Misc. Furniture 
Pipe, etc. 



-2323 Army St. 
-1990 Newcomb Ave, 
-Moccasin, Cal if. 
-So. San Francisco 
-24th & Utah Sts. and 

2 sub-stores 

General Stores, 

Washington & Mason 

Potrero and one sub-store 
-S. F. General Hospital 1 

22nd. & Potrero 

Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dewey 
-Golden Gate Park 
-901 Rankin St.. 

- Hall of Justice Garage (Sub-Store) 



108,640.86 

540,009.81 

53,790.76 

40, 937.86 

278,583.82 



324,797.75 

112,564.00 
227,425.67 

372,165.54 
35,924.28 
73,936.41 
9l f 698.19 
38,269.26 



* Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory 



- 11 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division is staffed by the following: 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

11 Senior Storekeepers 
21 Storekeepers 
8 Assistant Storekeepers 
1 Laborer 
TOTAL Tf 



SALES DIVISION 

Fourteen sales were conducted during fiscal year under the authority 
of Section 7.100 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal research 
into various aspects of different sales, preparation of sales, inviting 
interested buyers to bid, opening and awarding of bids, collecting and 
depositing all money received from buyers with the City Treasurer and 
keeping records of correspondence relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of 1972-73 was: $54,166.51. 

A general breakdown of the sales is as follows? 

Scrap Metal & Iron $13,139.93 

Trailer 791.23 

Cars - Trucks 25,493.25 

X-Ray Film 701.18 

Washer Parts 105.50 

Lead Cable 3, 046.61 

Fire Hose 2,248.55 

Waste Paper 5,445.61 

Grease & Bones 1,261.80 

Sacks - Containers 332^85 

Disc Pack 1,600.00 



- 12 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPME NT - Continued 



INVENTORY DIVISION 

This division has the assignment of maintaining the Equipment 
inventory of all City Departments; the investigation and reports to the 
Board of Supervisors on lost, damaged, or stolen items of equipment. We 
conducted surveys of Departments and updated the Perpetual Inventory 
records. A physical inventory of equipment in Model Cities Agencies was 
started in this fiscal year. 

We estimated or secured estimates from moving concerns for various 
moves required by City Departments or Agents. We recommend procedure, 
confer and set the dates and requirements for moving or other liaison detail. 

The accumulation of various Waste materials, such as, Waste paper 
(office records), Tab Cards (I.B.M ), X-Ray film, and miscellaneous scrap 
metal is gathered up by this Division for arrangement of disposal by sale* 
Surplus furniture and equipment that has further use is made available to 
other City Departments by transfer. 



- 13 - 



■■— :■■:.: ■ 



BUREAU OF STORES AND E QUI Pit NT - Continued 



STORES DIVISION 

During the past fiscal year, Civil Service lists were adopted for 
1932 Assistant Storekeeper and 193^ Storekeeper necessitating various 
personnel changes to replace temporary employments. 

Four (k) 1932 Assistant Storekeeper permanent positions were filled 
from the new list and sent to the following locations - one to S. F. General 
Hospital; two to the Muni Railway at 24th & Utah Sts.j and one to Muni Rail- 
way, Ocean Ave. A 1932 Assistant Storekeeper was assigned on a temporary 
basis to Laguna Honda Hospital* 

Six (6) 1934 Storekeeper permanent positions were filled from the new 
list and sent to the following locations - one to Muni Railway Presidio 
Store; one to Muni Railway 24th & Utah Sts.; one to Muni Railway Pot." fro 
Store; one to Purchasing Dept,, Central Warehouse, and two to the Water 
Department. A temporary 1 93^+ Storekeeper was assigned to the storeroom at 
Central Shops. 

One (1) 1932 Assistant Storekeeper from Muni Railway Ocean Ave., and 
one (1) 1934 Storekeeper from Laguna Honda Hospital resigned their permanent 
pos i t i ons . 

A 1936 Senior Storekeeper received a permanent appointment to the Pur- 
chasing Dept., Central Warehouse, replacing a retired employee. This appoint^ 
ment left a temporary opening for a 1936 Sr, Storekeeper at the Muni Railway 
Potrero Store. 

The Purchasing Dept., Central Warehouse lost to retirement Evelyn 
DeFillipo, a 1446 Senior Clerk Stenographer 

Work is nearing completion on the new S. F. General Hospital which will 
include a modern storeroom, which will make for a more efficient operation. 

In the near future, building will start on the new facility of the 
Muni Railway for automotive and machine shops. This installation will include 
consolidation of several existing storerooms at the new location. 

Safety literature, advice and suggestions were provided on a continuing 
basis to the personnel at the various storerooms under the Bureau of Stores 
and Equipment of the Purchasing Department. 

The Stores and Equipment Supervisor and Assistant Supervisor were requested 
by the Civil Service Commission to participate on the oral board for the 1932 
Assistant Storekeeper and 1934 Storekeeper examinations. Also the Stores and 
Equipment Assistant Supervisor served on the oral board for Storekeeper III 
promotional in Alameda County* 



- 14 - 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 



The Reproduction Bureau provides centralized service to 
all City Departments for photography, offset printing, 
mimeographing, blueprinting, microfilming, and self- 
service copiers . 

Funds to operate the Bureau are provided by Work Orders 
from over 7 Departments that use the Bureau's facilities. 
Our production increased this year by approximately 19%, 
while charges to departments increased by only ten per 
cent, to $227,000. There was some increase in salaries, 
and some increase in the cost of supplies, so the differ- 
ence between the increase in production and the increase in 
charges is greater than it appears. The difference is 
largely due increased efficiency of the staff, and partly 
due to some changed procedures and equipment. 

The death of Jack Gordon, for several years a very valuable 
member of the staff, was a great loss to our department, 
both personally and in terms of the great job he did. 

Major Functions of the Bureau 

We photograph people, places and events. For instance, 
the official photograph of the Board of Supervisors is 
made by the Bureau. The greater part of the work is to 
record progress of building construction. 

We mimeograph reports, forms, and calendars with 90% of the 
jobs completed within one day. 

We print (photo-offset) forms, booklets and reports in sizes 
up to 17" x 22". We were formerly able to complete 70% of 
the offset jobs within two days, but a greater workload, 
longer runs, and many more complicated jobs have cut that 
figure back to perhaps 60%. 

We make wet blueprints and dry (ammonia) prints up to 42" 
wide, largely for architectural use. The difficulty of 
obtaining blueprint paper is increasing and departments 
now requiring blueprints should seek funds for making a 
change to other processes in the next two or three years. 

We microfilm documents on 16mm and 35mm film for record 
keeping, and for reproduction on our 1824 Xerox. We for- 
merly used a very inefficient hectograph for certain kinds 
of duplicating, but some clever thinking and hard work on 



-15-1 



the part of Ray Suen, the Bureau's foreman, led us to do 
that work faster, better, and cheaper with 35 mm film 
and the 1824. The City's records pile up as so much must 
be preserved. With a larger microfilm camera and some 
auxiliary equipment, we could preserve records in perhaps 
one per cent of the space now required. 

We make photostat copies up to 18" x 24". Although our 
camera is 25 years old, there doesn't appear to be any 
practical substitute. 

We provide self-service copiers in Room 50, City Hall, 
and at 450 McAllister Street. 

The work we print is often collated, folded, stitched, 
or cut to size. We've had a considerable increase of 
these processes, frequently requiring individual hand 
operations. These are inevitably slower and more"-; ex- 
pensive. One possible way of increasing speed is to buy 
a 200 bin sorter. 

The large press added in 1971 is clearly cutting our costs 
and increasing production speed. There is a definite need 
for new and replacement equipment if we are to keep costs 
down, and continue to handle an increasing workload. 



-16- 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

The Central Shops, and allied facilities, provide necessary 
mechanical maintenance and repair service for -ll clty departments 
and bureaus, except public utilities. 

In addition, it is the responsibility of the Bureau to inspect, 
appraise, and make recommendations on all clty owned vehicles contem- 
plated for replacement; aid the various departments in the writing of 
various specifications; amd to receive and approve all new vehicles 
delivered to the clty and county of san francisco. 



Administration and major repair 
Central Shops, 800 Quint Street. 



FACILITIES ARE LOCATED AT THE 



Other installations are: Golden Gate Park Shop, providing maint- 
enance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; Hall of Justice 
Service Station, where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police ano 
other City cars, along with inspection and light maintenance for Police 
vehicles. Department of Public Works, Army street Yard where fuels, 
lubricants, ano preventive maintenance inspection is prcvideo public 
works vehicles. 19^ avenue public works station, health department 
Garage, and Department of Electricity Garage. 

Administration of the Shops, unoer the Purchaser of Supplies, 
is the Direct Responsibility of Mr. Albert M. Flaherty, General Super- 
intendent, aided by Mr. Eomond A. Rames, City Shops Assistant Superin- 
tenden t. 

The Central Shops, Quint Street operation, has four main maint- 
enance shop areas. They are 1) Automobile, 2) Truck, 3) Fire Apparatus, 
k) Machine; and the following auxilliary shops: Blacksmith, Pattern and 
Ladder Shop, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body and Fender, Tire, and Service 
Stat ion . 

Along with the responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of 
mechanical equipment and school buildings, sewage plants, pumping 
stations, public building, etc., the Shops maintain 2512 motorized 
units of the clty owned fleet, an increase of 26 over the fiscal ear 
1971-72. These vehicles and machines are valued at approximately 
7.5 million dollars. 

The Bureau is staffed with 101 employees. No additional per- 
manent EMPLOYEES HAVE BEEN ADDED THESE PAST SEVERAL YEARS, THOUGH THE 

Work Order system of financing permits us to obtain temporary employ- 
ments FOR SEASONAL OR "AS NEEOEO" PROJECT COMPLETION. 



- 17 - 



FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 

The Fire Shop is staffed with eight Automotive Machinists, Two 
Pattern Makers, One Blacksmith, Two Metalsmiths, One Upholsterer, Three 
Painters, One Body and Fender Man, and One Automotive Serviceman. 

Two Foremen, Mr. A. Del Negro and Mr. Ray Monti, oversee and 
control the maintenance and repair of all a-paratus and equipment useo 
by our Fire Fighting Force. 

This Shop processed a total of 1,120 major jobs through the various 
work areas for the year. k2k units of Fire apparatus were repaired 
and returned to service. 

The field service man responded to 3,079 service calls and com- 
pleted 1,901 repairs in the fire HOUSES without necessitating the ap- 
paratus BEING OUT OF SERVICE FOR ANY APPRECIABLE PERIOD OF TIME. 

Shop personnel responded to 111 battery service calls in the 
field and serviced and lubricated 261 units of fire apparatus in the 
Shop. 

two aerial tractors were modernized and repowered with 6-71 detriot 
i esel eng ines. 

Included in the total jobs completed for the Fire Department 



10 - Major Engine Overhauls 

165 - Minor engine overhauls and/or repairs 

128 - Fire Pump and Gate repairs 

3 - Major pump overhauls 

56 - Small engine repairs 

10^ - Chassis repairs 

36 - Trans overhauls 

60 - Radiator repairs 

100 - Tune ups 

23^ - Electrical repairs 

217 - Various brake jobs and brake-related repairs 

35 - aer i al repa i rs 

6 - Pieces of apparatus cannibalized 

ELECTRIC SHOP 

23^ Electrical repairs. Also repairs and overhauls small equip- 
ment, such as Chain Saws, Sm. Pumps, Generating Plants and Water 
Vacuums, etc. 

PATTERN SHOP 



Made 12 new ladders 
Repaired 67 Ladders 
Made 20 New Gleason Saddles 
6 New Patterns 
kO " Chock Blocks 

Repaired and/or restored various pieces of equipment such as 
Pike Poles - Ceiling Hooks, Crotch Poles - Patterns and add pieces out 
of wood for other shops. 

- 18 - 



PAINT SHOP 

Touch up and paint all accident repairs including lettering and 
Gold Leaf. Most items made in pattern shop and blacksmith shop, also 
parts and assemblies from main repair shop. 

Included are: 46 Ladders refinisheo 

k Fire Engines complete 
10 dpw vehicles complete 
30 Street Cleaning Buggies 
13 Tool Box Trailers - Sewer Dept. 
5 Tool. Heaters - St. Repair Dept. 
3 Aerial Laoders refinisheo 
recoat inside of water tank 

BLACKSMITH SHOP 

Repair ano fabricate ano sharpen tools - brackets - vehicles 

BOOIES AND TRAILERS AND CHASSIS FOR ALL SHOPS. Ma K E UP BOXES AND COM- 
PARTMENTS for Fire Apparatus, Ladder fittings, pole ends, repair valves 
and fittings for high pressure. 

Major project completed this Fiscal Year was the manufacture of 
our Hydraulic Mobile Dolly for the Police Helicopter Squad. This device 
not available on the market, permits the elicopter crew to move their 
flying machine on the ground before and after take off. 

UPHOLSTERY SHOP 

Repairs and reupholsters seat for all shops. Makes leather fin- 
dings ie - Belts-Straps and fastenings for Fire Dept. Water proof covers 
for fire department equipment. canvas stretcher - carry all and covers 
for fire department. web straps and leather flash lite holders and 
canvass bags for fire department. 

TRUCK SHOP - HEAVY DUTY SHOP 

The Truck Shop (Heavy Duty) is responsible for the maintenance and 
repair of the larger clty owned vehicles such as 10 wheel trucks, vans, 
tank wagons, mechanical sweepers, tractors, road and paving machines, 
fork lifts and crane mounted vehicles} sewer repair and general cons- 
truction equipment including compressors, back hoes, pavement saws, core 
drillers and various types of vehicle mounted pumps. 

The work involveo here ranges from minor preventive maintenance 
through major rebuilding of engines, bodies, chassis members, hydraulic 
systems and the related special equipment which is mounted on these 
various ano specialized vehicles. 

The Heavy Duty Shops is staffed by one Foreman, Mr. Arthur Chin, 

11 Automotive Machinists, and six Automotive Servicemen. 

During the year this section of Central Shops performed 1952 
jobs which included repairs, rebuilding and modifications to trucks 
and heavy duty specialty equipment. 

The general resume of jobs completed by the Truck Shop during the 
year include the following: 

8 - Engines completely rebuilt 
6k - Engines overhauled 



196 - Brake systems overhauled 

146 - Radiator ano cooling systems overhauled 

M-6 - Body reconstruction obs (accidents) 

98 - Starters rebuilt 
125 - Alternators/generators rebuilt 

78 - Transmission repairs 
237 - Motor tune-ups 

In addition the Truck Shop, through its supervisory staff, is 
responsible for the operations at four other sub-shops as follows: 

QUINT STREET GAS STATION 

Gasoline dispensed 13^,132 Gallons 

Oil dispensed 12,906 Quarts 

Vehicles lubricated 1,175 

19 tt AVENUE GAS STATION 



Gasoline dispensed 57,735 Gallons 

Oil dispensed 1,537 Quarts 

Vehicles lubricated 96 

QUINT STREET TIRE SHOP 

New tires mounted and re-caps mounted 1,160 
t i res repa i red 688 

Road Calls (Tire Services) 30^ 

DEPT. OF ELECTRICITY (GARAGE ) 

Lubes and services 212 

Road Calls (Tires, stalls, etc) 52 

ARMY STREET (DPW) STATION 

This service facility is located in the D.P.W. maintenance yard 
at 2323 Army Street. 

Its function is to provide minor maintenance ano repairs, prevent- 
ive maintenance ano fuels and lubricants to the fleet of the Department 
of Public Works automotive equipment units. Services are available 
from 7:00 a.m. to "lonight, five (5) days per week. 

The station is staffed with one Automotive "achinist, four Auto- 
motive Servicemen and one Sub-Foreman, Mr. Elmer Bryden, 

The fiscal year saw 2,726 various repair and service jobs comple- 
ted. 295,656 GALLONS OF GASOLINE WERE DISPENSED ALONG WITH 2,319 GAL- 
LONS OF KEROSENE AND 2,572 GALLONS OF LUBE OIL. 

AUTOMOTIVE SHOP 

This Shop is staffed with seven (7) Automotive Mechanics, two (2) 
Automotive Servicemen ano one (1) Automotive Machinist foreman, Mr. 
Ed . Franke . 

The Automotive Shop is responsible for repair and maintenance of 
1,2h-9 City owned vehicles which include both passenger cars and trucks 
to 3/^ ton capacity. The vehicle inventory has been increaseo this 
year with k light busses for the hunters point model clty rogram, 10 
Police cars for drivers training, 5 H onda 125's for Park and Beach 
Patrol, 25 undercover Police vehicles, 10 light trucks to replace ren- 
ted veh i clcs . 

- ?0 - 



The Automotive S H op remains certified as a Official Headlamp 
adjusting station and official motor vehicle pollution control device 
installation and inspection station. 

Major projects accomplished was the outfitting of 11 Fire Depart- 
ment vehicles, 131 Police vehicles, 145 vehicles for various other 
Departments. Of the 131 olice vehicles outfitted, 66 were equiptco for 
— undercover work. 62 were equip"ped for patrol service with specially 
manufactured security partitions, special rear door locks, roof mounted 
light bars and spot lights. large vehicle numbers were installed on the 

ROOF OF ALL POLICE PATROL Un I TS FOR VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION FROM POLICE 

Helicopters, Police phone numbers were installed on both rear fender of 
all Police vehicles. 3 station wagons were outfitted with security 
partitions front and rear for Police Dog units. 20 undercover lease 
vehicles were restored to like new condition as per contract provission, 
for return to dealer. 

The total number of jobs completeo this year by the Automotive 
Shop was 3,6^4 which does not include the outfitting of new vehicles. 

A listing of completed jobs INCLUDE 66*f BRAKE jobs ano safety 
inspection of drums, wheel cylinders and hydraulic lines, 785 TUNE UPS 

WITH OUR SUN ELECTRONIC ENGINE TESTER, 186 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS WERE 
COMPLETELY OVERHAULED, 127 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION SERVICED AND ADJUSTEO 
TO FACTORY SPECIFICATIONS, 160 RADIATORS WERE OVERHAULED, 70 VALUE 
GRINDS AND 25 ENGINE OVERHAULS WERE COMPLETED, 303 ROAD SERVICE CALLS 
REQUIRING MINOR REPAIRS OR TOWS TO THE SHOP FOR MAJOR WORK, 527 WHEEL 
ALIGNMENTS WERE COMPLETED WITH OUR BEAR FRONT WHEEL ALIGNING RACK, 
THIS ALIGNEMENT IS OF VITAL IMPORTANCE DUE TO INCREASED TIRE SIZES, 
LOWER AIR PRESSURE AND FRONT END SUSPENSION WEAR. 

1,013 MISCELLANEOUS REPAIRS WERE PERFORMED FOR VARIOUS DEPARTMENT 
VEHICLES. 

ACCIOENT REPA I RS N UMBERED 3^ • VEHICLES INVOLVED IN MAJOR ACCI- 
DENTS ARE REPAIRED AT LOW COST AND RETURNED TO SERVICE BY USING NECES- 
SARY PARTS AND BODY SECTIONS FROM TURNED IN VEHICLES. In MANY CASES 

vehicles in need of minor repair are returned to service in one day 
by replacing damaged parts with salvaged parts. 

The Automotive Shop has completed 89 jobs on Police Department 
Motorcycles. These jobs include engine overhauls, clutch replacement, 
transmission overhauls and accident repairs. 

MACHINE SHOP 



857 

EN AN 

Raos 



and 

SECT 
MACH 
SCH0 



During the fiscal year 1972-73 this Shop completed a total of 
jobs. The complement of the Machine Shop consists of 9 maint- 

CE MACHINIST AND 1 MAINTENANCE MACHINIST FOREMAN, Mr. JOHN J. 

The machine shop section services all public schools, the service 
repair of all machine tools and hand tools of the Industrial Art 
ion of the School Department, the moving and locating of all 
ine tools, of the Inbustrial Arts Shops. In the new McAteer High 
ol. 

All pumps, fans, blowers related to the heating system in the 
iols are serviced and repaired by this oivision of central shops. 

The machine shop repairs and overhauls sewer pumps, check valves, 

valves in the sewer pumping station located thru-out the clty. 



- 21 - 



All pumps, fans and blowers related to the heating system in 
the community college district is repaired by the machine shop. 

The high pressure water system that provides water to fight large 

FIRES IN THE ClTY REQUIRES THE SERVICES OF THE MACHINE SHOP. In KEEPING 

in top working order the machinery and hardware such as boiler room 
equipment and fire hydrants to carry out this service. 

The sewer treatment plant consisting of Richmond-Sunset, North- 
Point Southeast are kept in repair by 4 machinist under the super- 
vision OF THE MACHINE SHOP FOREMAN. 

The maintenance machinist in these plants, repair and maintain 
pump filter, driers and gas blower and related machinery necessary to 
carry out a 2k hour a day operation of these plants. 

The Hose Shop is a sub-section of the Machine Shop. This unit 
inspects, repairs and distributes all fire hose used in the flre dept. 

Turing the past Fiscal Y E ar 1972-73, 40,000 feet of new hose 
was received, inspected, labelled and distributed to the various com- 
PANIES of the Fire Dept. 

Over 15 ( OOO feet of in-service fire hose was repaired and tes- 
ted AND SENT BACK TO THE F|RE COMPANIES OF THE FlRE DEPARTMENT. 

RECREATION AND PARK SHCP 

The Golden Gate Park Automotive repair shop, located at 3rd Ave. 
and South Drive, is staffed with 3 Automotive Machinists, 1 Automotive 
Serviceman and one (1) foreman (Mr. James Elliot). In addition Auto- 
motive machinist has been employed on a temporary basis. 

The fiscal year 1972-73 saw 1,397 job orders written ano com- 
pleted IN THIS FACILITY. 

Major repair projects included 1) complete overhaul of drive 
sprockets and chains along with replacement of elevator pan, conveyor 
belts and squeezes with the single street sweeper operated by the 
Recreation and Park Department. At a later date, due to an operational 
accident, the complete gutter broom assembly was rebuilt. 2) overhaul 
and redesign beach cleaner machine to provide a superior operator 
safety factor. 3) rebuild ano redesign old pick up truck with wide, 
flat bed for nursery use. k ) completely rebuild floating weed cut- 
ter for controlling lake and pond growth. 5) provide major repair 
and overhaul to a.c. bucket loader. 6) rebuild 2# ton dump truck in- 
cluding complete overhaul of transmission and hoist mechanism. 

The service station dispensed 1^0,000 gallons of fuel and 6,871 
quarts of oil to the recreation a f j d ^ark f l i- e t and other clty depart- 
MENTS. Because of the gasoline shortage it became necessary, on June 

1, TO RESTRICT FUEL FROM THIS STATION TO RECREATION AND PARK UNITS 
ONL Y . 

This year, as in past year, the Recreation and Park Department 

ALONG WITH THE EXPANDED CANDLESTICK Park, HAS ADDED NEW EQUIPMENT 
TO THEIR OPERATION WHILE AT THE SAME TIME HAVE NOT REPLACED MANY ITEMS 
OF AUTOMOTIVE ANO MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT THAT ARE OVER AGE AND WORN 
BEYOND ECONOMICAL REPAIR. |T IS HOPED THAT A REALISTIC REPLACEMENT 
PROGRAM MIGHT BE DEVELOPED SO THAT THE COSTLY REBUILDING OF OBSOLETE 
EQUIPMENT MIGHT BE AVOIDED. 



- 22 - 



HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION 



This branch of the 
west of the h a l l of justi 
Department vehicles and s 
vehicles. The station is 
night ano is staffed with 
Mechanics and one Automot 

The convenient down 
Police vehicles make this 
and lubricants for City v 

The past year shows 

Gasoline disp 
Oil d i s penseo 
Tow Jobs 
Tires changed 
Batteries ser 
Lube and serv 
Mechanical re 
Brake reline 



Cen tral Shops is 

ce. It provides 

uppl i es gasoline 

operated 7 days 

9 AuTOMOT I VE SE 

I VE Mechan I c Sub- 

-TOWN LOCATION AN 
A HIGH VOLUME D I 
EH I CLES . 



located on bryant street, 
fuel and service to police 
and oil to other c i ty 
a week from 7 a.m. to m|d- 
vicemen, 2 Automotive 
Foreman, Mr. Harry Maker. 

d the accelerated useage of 
stribution point of fuel 



the following services performed: 72-73 

ensed 576,000 Gallons 

14,719 Quarts 
1,302 
1,579 
ed) 285 
1,71^ 
7,973 
258 



(new & recap) 
vice (new & charg 

ICE JOBS 
PA I PS 
JOBS 



MOTORCYCLE SERVICE 

Lube 

Tires changed 
b a tter i es 
Repa IRS 



419 
257 
333 

1,542 



In addition to the summary report o 
Hall of Justice Service Station, the belo 
station to upgrade the operation and incr 

The gas island canopys were painted 
the gas islands was textured to help prev 
slipping or falling. a permanent steel t 
repair area was installed. a system for 
was devised and initiated. motorcycle re 
reduce the cost of minor repairs which fo 
outside agencies. a vehicle work record 
The oaily work sheets were revised to sho 
parts used on each individual repair job. 
system was instigated utilizing number an 
cubes with magnetic buses that are placed 



F WORK PERFORMEO AT THE 
W WORK WAS OONE AT THE 
EASE I TS EFFICIENCY. 

. The CONCRETE SURFACE OF 
ENT ACCIDENTS CAUSED BY 

IRE RACK IN THE TIRE 
CHECKING MILEAGE ON TIRES 
PAIRS WERE EXPANDED TO 
RMERLY WERE SENT TO 
SYSTEM WAS INITIATED. 
W THE WORK DONE ANO THE 

A SHOP JOB N UMBER 
COLOR CODED STYROFOAM 
ON THE ROOF OF VEHICLES. 



" 23 - 



CENTRAL SHOPS OFFICE SECTION 

The office staff, under the direction of Senior Manage- 
ment Assistant, Edward L. Stone, incluoes a Senior Account 
Clerk, one Account Clerk, one Clerk-Typist and a Time-Roll 
Keeper. 

This work nucleus combines its efforts towards keeping 
the shop books in good balance, meeting payroll deadlines, 
requisitioning new personnel, preparing monthly and annual 
financial ano expenditure statements; and fulfilling a myriad 
of other accounting and clerical assignments wnlch fall to the 
lot of those responsible for an expenditure activity well in 
excess of two million dollars annually. 

The major fiscal responsibility derives from a accounting 
for mcre than 200 interdepartmental work orders that pour in 
each year from some seventy clty departments, divisions and 
bureaus. the end object is to regiment tht daily expenditure 
outlay to align with incoming funds and thus insure a satis- 
FACTORY "BALANCING OF THE budget". 

The success of these efforts is indicated by control of 
fun0s to within .003% of the dollar amount made available for 
shop operation. 



- 24 - 



CONCLUSION 
The fiscal year 1972-73 saw the continuance of maximum 

ACTIVITY AND EFFORT BY THE CENTRAL ShOPS TO FULFILL T H E I R WORK 
RESPONS I B I L I T I ES . 

A RECENT REVIEW OF STATISTICS INCLUDED IN A DETAILEO 1959 
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS STUDY OF THE CENTRAL ShOPS SHOWS AT THAT 

time, the Central Shops maintained 1,573 units of eouipment with 
9^- total employees. 

Today 101 employees (an increase of 7Y$>) maintains 2,512 
units of automotive equipment (an increase of 627^). 

It should be obvious that the relationship of manpower to 

EQUIPMENT IS BEING EXTENDED TO A CRITICAL POINT. All THE MORE SO 
WHEN WE CONSIDER THAT TODAYS VEHICLE ARE MUCH MORE COMPLEX AND 
DEMANDING DUE TO THEIR MANDATORY SMOG CONTROL AND SAFETY SYSTEMS. 

THE SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEM IS EITHER MO J E MANPOWER OR, MORE 
REALISTICALLY, A VEHICLE REPLACEMENT PROGRAM IN KEEPING WITH MO- 
DERN AUTOMOTIVE FLEET PRACTICE. 

SUCH A PROGRAM HAS BEEN DEVELOPED BY THIS DEPARTMENT. IT 
ELIMINATES THE FRILLS OFTEN FOUND IN PRIVATE INDUSTRY PROGRAMS 
BUT, NONE-THE-LESS , PROVIDE FOR TIMELY AND CONSERVATIVE REPLACE- 
MENT of essential City owned vehicles. 

Unfortunately, except in isolateo incidences, budgetary 
action has restricted the implementation of such a program. 

Again we urge that serious consideration be given to improve 
a situation where over aged - high mileage vehicles must be con- 
tinually overhauled and rebuild beyond their economic life span. 

The answer would appear to be in an acceptable replacement 
program that will provide the clty with an efficient transportation 
unit - reduce cost and down time associated with major repair and 
provide greater return to the clty when the equipment is disposed 

OF . 



- 25 - 



CENTRAL - SHOPS COSTS OF OPERATIONS FOR 1972-73 
Compared with Costs for 1971 - 72 



Fiscal Year Fiscal Year 

1972-73 1971-72 
PERSONAL SERVICES: 

Administrative Salaries $ 20,514.00 $ 19,224.00 

Shops Crafts Wages 1,183,896.00 1,088.631.00 

Employees Retirement Contributions. . 121,634.00 100,493.00 

Social Security Contributions • . . 43,205.00 37,000.00 

Total $1,369,249.00 $ 1,245,348.00 

Direct Plant Overhead Costs 145,172.00 117,388.00 

Contractual Services . . 160,050.00 183,980.00 

Materials & Surplus . 363,527.00 342,540.00 

TOTAL $2,037,998.00 I 1,889*256.00 



FISCAL NOTES: 

1. To reflect gross operating costs, the Central Shops indirect 
overhead expenditures have been introduced this year to the above 
statement. the inclusion of the additional cost element makes it 
possible to present a more accurate concept of the annual f un d s 
required to operate this bureau. 

2. The decrease in contractual services OUTLAY IS ATTRIBUTED mainly 
to a marked increase in the number of accident repairs com- 
pleted at the shops. the extent of fire and police department 
equipment repaireo on the outside during 1972-73 was lowest for 
the past five years . 

3. Increases in materials and supplies costs were ccntra-balanced 
by the downwaro trend in contractual services expenditures. 



- 26 - 



HOW CENTRAL SHOPS SPENT FUNDED DOLLARS 
P UR ING THE YEAR 1972-73 




GRAND TOTAL OPERATING COSTS $2,037,998 



- 27 - 



CENTRAL SHOPS ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 
800 Qu int Street 



7150 General Superintendent of Shops 
7277 Assistant Superintendent of Shops 
1844 Senior Management Assistant 
1632 Senior Account Clerk 
1630 Account Clerk 
"\k2k Clerk-Typist 





TRUCK SHOP 


1 


- 7254 


Foreman 


11 


- 7313 


Auto Machinist 


1 


- 7^10 


Auto Serv i ceman 


• 1 


- 7^10 


Auto Ser v i ceman 


•1 


- 7^10 


Auto Ser v i ceman 




TIRE 


SHOP 


2 


- 7^10 


Auto Ser v i ceman 




BOD^ 


SHOP 



Station 



3 - Body & Fender Man 
BLACKSMITH SHOP 
3 - 7389 Metalsmith 

MACHINE SHOP 

1 - 7237 Ma int. Machinist Foreman 
3 - 73^+3 Ma int. Machinist 

** - 73^3 Maint. Machinist (Sewage Plant) 

2 - 73^3 Maint. M ACHIN | ST (Schools) 



PASSENGER SHOP 

1 - 72^9 Foreman 

7 - 7381 *uto Mechan i c 

1 - 7381 a uto Mechanic (XF) 

1 - 7h-10 Auto Serviceman 

♦1 - 7h-10 Auto Serviceman 

*1 - 7410 Auto Sercman . (Heal th 

Garage) 

FIRE SHOP 

1 - 7254 Foreman 

1 - 7315 Sub-Foreman 

7 - 7313 Auto Machinist 

1 - 7313 a uto Machinist (Field 

Serv i ce) 

2 - 7^+10 a uto Serviceman 

2 - 7358 Pattern Maker 
1 - 7387 Upholsterer 

3 - 7309 Pa inter 
(D- 7309 Painter (XF) 

1 - 01 Cahuffeur (Fire House 
Del i ver i es) 



WATCHMAN 
3 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman 

19 tt avlnue station 

1 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman 

DEPT. OF ELECTRICITY YARD 
*1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

DPW YARD (SERVICE STATION) 
•1 - 7*t10 Auto Serviceman 

2 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman (Night Gas) 
1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman (Night PM) 

1 - 7315 Auto Machinist - Sub-Foreman 
1 _ 7315 Auto Machinist ( u ight PM) 



HALL OF JUSTICE 

♦1 - 7382 Sub-Foreman 

2 - 7381 Auto Mechan i c 
*1 _ 7^12 Sub-Foreman 

*8 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman 

PARK SHOP 
1 - 725^ Foreman 

3 - 7313 Auto m achinist 

1 - 7313 Auto Machinist (XF) 
*1 _ 7Z+IG Auto Serviceman 

(Assigned from Bur. of Stores & Equip.) 

1 - 1936 General Storekeeper 
1 _ 193^ Storekeeper 



- 28 - 



19 Budgeted 

79 WO (Work Order) 

3 (XF) Extra Fund 
101 



UNITS OF CITY-OWNED VEHICLES Bv DEPARTMENT 
PER IBM INVENTORY RUN AS OF JAN. 1, 1973 



DEPT. 




NO. OF 


DEPT. 




NO. OF 


NO 


DEPARTMENT 


VEHICLES 


NO 


DEPARTMENT 


VEHICLES 


111 


Adult Probation 


7 


535 


Health Centers 


5 


115 


Assessor 


2 


539 


Pub. Health Nursing 


1 


117 


City Attorney 


2 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 


17 


119 


City Plann ing 


2 


553 


Hassle r Hospitu 


9 


123 


Con troller 


1 


555 


Laguna Honda Hosp. 


14 


131 


S.F. Disaster Corps. 


5 


557 


S.F. Gen. Hospital 


10 


141 


District Attorney 


5 


561 


Mental Admin . 


3 


145 


Fire De pa rtmen t 


267 


567 


Mental Health 


3 


151 


Mayor 


5 








151.3 


Model Cities Prog . 
Pol i ce Department 


314 








161 








161-N 


Pol i ce Ren tals 


21 


611 


Legion of Honor 


1 


165 


Publ ic Defender 


3 


621 


DeYoung Museum 


1 


169 


Social Services 


40 


631 


PubLic Library 


8 


170 


Single Men's Rehab. 


2 


651 


REC.&PARK - GtrERAL 


160 


173 


Sheriff 


40 


651-S 


Rec.&Park - (Non-Auto 


) 328 


181 


Board of Supervisors 


3 








185 


Jeven i le Court 


19 


s 


.F. UN I FIED SCHOOL D I ST . 


187 


J . C . Log Cabin 


6 








188 


Hidoen Valley Schoil 


2 


661-B 


John O'Connell 


3 


213 


Ca . Academy of Science 9 


661-E 


Shop Trucks 


9 


221 


Chief Aomin. Officer 


2 


661-F 


Gardners Autos, etc. 


23 


223 


Coroner 


5 


661-G 


Delivery Trucks 


12 


233 


Dept. of Electricity 


39 


661-H 


Aomin i strat i on 


5 


21*3 


Public Administrator 


3 


661-J 


Delivery, Furniture 


6 


245 


Real Estate 


1 


669 


C i ty College 


17 


255 


Registrar of Voters 


1 








261 


Tax Collector 


7 


775 


S. F, Port Commission 


63 


265 


Weights & Measures 


10 








311 


Purchasing-Main Off h 


:e 4 


DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 


312 


Purch-Central Shops 


40 


681 


DPW - Street Repair 


101 


I 


DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 




683 

686 


Bureau of Engineering 

DPW - Tree Plant i ng 


28 
43 


413 


Architecture 


9 






2272 


415 


Bldg. Inspection 


44 


161-T 


Police Trails Bikes 


19 


415.1 


F.A.C.E. Program 


5 


161-M 


Police '"'otorcycles 


221 


417 


Blog . Repair 


112 




GRAND TOTAL - - - 


2512 


417.2 


Traffic Painting 


27 








421 


Engineering 


35 








423 


General Office 


3 








424 


Personnel Adm. 


3 








425 


Sewage Pump i ng 


2 








427 


Sewage Trea tmen t 


25 








429 


Sewage Re pa i r 


120 








431 


Street Cleaning 


106 








I 


pjblich health department 









513 Administration 9 

525.1 Comm. Disease 2 

527 Milk & Da iry *\k 

531 Food & Sanitary Insp. 15 



- 29 - 



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APPENDIX 



TABLE NO. 1 

PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 





1971-1972 






1972-1973 






Purchase 






Purchase 








Orders 




Amount 


Orders 




Amount 


General 


15,1*48 


$ 


10,956,693 


15014 


$ 


12,103,524 


Education 


10,157 




5,065, 424 


9326 




5,341,317 


Health 


6,441 




4,437,323 


5335 




4,788,134 


Utilities 


6,102 


$ 


4,948,536 


5627 


$ 


5,401,575 


Total 


38,148 


25,14-27,978 


35302 


27,634,550 



1971-1972 

Purchases by 

Encumbrance Request $ 37,860,397 



1972-1973 
$ 49,261,958 



Purchases through 
Contract Certification 



$ 1,061,552 



GRAND TOTAL 



$ 77,958,060 



TABLE NO. 2 
EXPENDITURES 



Comparisons of expenditures with original budget for 
all appropriations except Personal Service for 1972-73. 



Account 



Budgeted & Encumbered 

Supplemented & Expended Surplus Deficit 



Contract Services 

2.311.200.000 $ 14.6614.7 $ 5514-31 



$ 878I4. 



Materials & Supplies 
2.311.300.000 II4.O9I4. 



10582 3512 



Equipment 
2.311.1;00.000 



14-65 



klk 



51 



Premium Official B onds 
2.311.812.000 7000 



8716 



1716 



Premium Auto Insurance 
2.311.813.000 82555 



59158 



30627 



Misc. Insurance 
2.311.815.000 



51+825 



51+516 



309 



Membership 
2.311.8514..000 



866 



814.7 



19 



Total $ 2061+52 



$ 182I4.2I4. $ 3514.28 $ 10500 






PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

^-ANNUAL REPORT 



Fiscal Year 1973-74 



September, 1974 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and con- 
tractual services for all departments of the City and County, including 
City-owned utilities, the San Francisco Port Commission, the San Francisco 
Unified School District and the San Francisco Community College; repairs 
and maintains automotive and other equipment for the various departments, 
except Public Utilities, and for the School District as requested; oper- 
ates a central reproduction bureau for departments requiring its services; 
transfers to other departments for use or sells equipment and supplies no 
longer useful to any department of the City; maintains a perpetual inven- 
tory of equipment in the various departments; and operates central stores 
of the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the 
Shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on 
new products, specifications and prices. 

The Purchasing Department, during the fiscal year 1973-74, expended 
$33,134,213 through Purchase Orders, $53,824,210 through Emcumbrance Re- 
quests and approximately $2,518,652 through Certifications, for a total of 
$89,477,075, an increase of $11,519,015 over the previous year. Sales of 
Charters, Codes and other documents amounted to $18,785.00. 

The output of printing, mimeographing, microfilming, etc., by the 
Reproduction Bureau increased by 19$ at only a \0% increase in Interdepart- 
mental charges. This was due in part to new equipment, but also reflected 
increased efficiency due to new procedures and methods. 

The Bureau of Central Shops furnished maintenance, repair and service 
for 2674 motorized units of the City-cwned fleet, an increase of 162 units 
over the previous fiscal year. The total fleet is valued at approximately 
7.6 mi I I ion do I lars. 

The number of gallons of gasoline dispensed increased slightly over 
the previous year from 1,203,523 to 1,216,617, but is below the 1,261,047 
gals, dispensed in 1971-72. 

The Bureau of Central Shops is encountering a problem in maintaining 
repair and service because of the increase in the average age of the 
vehicles in the City fleet. As the vehicles become older, they need more 
and more repair each year. 



- I 



The Bureau of Stores and Equipment staffs the City's major storerooms, 
maintains inventory control of City-owned equipment and is responsible for 
the sale of surplus City equipment and supplies. Sales of these items 
amounted to $2,028,099 during the pas + fiscal year. 

PERSONNEL 

Authorized positions totaled 206 permanent in four Dureaus. The 
Organization Chart is shown in the Appendix. 

SUPERV I SPRY - June 30, 1974 

Admi nistrat i ve 

J. C. Gavin - Purchaser of Supplies 
Helen E. McManis - Secretary 
Phyllis Wagner - Sr. Clerk Typist 



BUREAUS 



Buy i ng 



R. Tecco - Asst. Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head. 

R.C. Erickson - Senior Purchaser (Buying Staff) 

G.A. Clarke - Senior Purchaser (S.F. General Hospital) 

G.F. Burket - Senior Purchaser (Specifications & Standardization) 

C.J. Morrissey - Coding Supervisor (Acting) -(Retired 2-20-74) 

Equipment and Supplies 

J.H. Beck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 

J. A. Frantz - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

Personnel and Accounts 



Anna Gibbons - Chief Clerk - Bureau Head 
Florence White - Principal Clerk 
Peter Pan - Senior Accountant 

Reproduction 

Edward Fundis - Reproduction Manager - Bureau Head 

Shops 

A.M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau Head 
E.R. Rames - Assistant Superintendent of City Shops 



- 2 - 



SEPARATIONS 



Ret i red 



Name 

DeFi I i ppo, Evelyn 
O'Toole, Fredrick J. 
Carbon i , Grace J . 
We I Is, Leo I a J . 
Morrissey, Charles J 
Finerty, George, Sr. 
Schneider, Francis 
Fri sel la, Joseph 

Died 



Pos i t i on 

Senior Clerk-Stenographer 
Automotive Serviceman 
Assistant Purchaser 
Senior Clerk-Typist 
Coding Supervisor 
Automotive Serviceman 
Automotive Machinist 
Automotive Machinist 



Approx. Years 
City Service 



Date 



15 


7-1-73 


17 


7-1-73 


22 


8-1-73 


19 


9-1-73 


31 


2-20-74 


18 


5-1-74 


22 


6-25-74 


30 


6-14-74 



Kopas, James 
Quinlan, John P. 



Storekeeper 
Automotive Serviceman 



6 
30 



11-6-73 

1-26-74 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED 

The work accomplished in the fiscal year is described in more detai 
under the separate bureaus. 

Recapitulation is as follows: 



Bureau 



Buying 



Unit 

Purchase Orders 
Amount 



1972 - 73 

35,302 
$25,427,978 



1973 - 74 

35,681 
$33,134,213 



Encumbrance Requests 
Amount 



$49,261,958 $53,824,213 



Contract Certifications 
Amount 



$ I ,061 ,552 $ 2,518,652 



Stores and Surplus Sales - Amount 
Equipment Major Stores Operated 



$54,167 



$ 2,028,099 



3 - 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED (Continued) 



Bureau Unit 1972-73 1973-74 

Shops Job Orders 8,970 9,251 

Expenditures $2,037,998 $2,139,440 

Gasol ine dispensed 1,023,523 1,216,017 gal 

Reproduction Services rendered 

Anr >ount $ 227,000 $ 256,000 

BUREAU OF BUYING 

The Bureau of Buying, under the supervision of the Assistant Director 
of Purchasing and Services, is responsible for the procurement of supplies, 
equipment, services and insurance for all City departments, the San Fran- 
cisco Unified School District and the San Francisco Community College 
District. As requisitions are received from the various City agencies, 
they are converted either directly to purchase orders, as in the case of 
term contract items, or to formal or informal bids by the appropriate 
buyer according to commodity code. Generally, the procurement functions 
(outlined in detail in a previous report) are as follows: 

I . BUYING - BIDS AND AWARDS 



Evaluation by requisition document to determine type of procure- 
ment action to be taken; preparation of bids to include contrac- 
tual and technical requirements; analysis and award of bids. 

II. BUYING - RELATED FUNCTIONS 



Analysis of records of previous purchases specifically related to 
factors of average use; maintenance of individual specification 
files and library of pertinent catalogs and technical data; re- 
search on new items; preparation of new and review and/or revision 
of old term contracts; and procedural review. 

BUYING PERSONNEL 



The buying staff consists of the following personnel 

1 - Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 
3 - Senior Purchasers 

7 - Purchasers 

2 - Purchasers (Printing) 
I - Assistant Purchaser 



4 - 



OPERATIONS 

1. Purchasing workload is assigned to the individual buyer on a 
commodity basis with allowance for items of a special nature or in cases 
where seasonal peaks or vacations make it advisable to deviate from this 
policy. Budget equipment (OE 400 funds) is also spread throughout the 
buying staff to prevent an overload on any particular buyer. 

2. Periodic meetings of the buying staff are held to permit the 
exchange of ideas; the formulation of improved operating procedures; dis- 
cussions of mutual problems; review and refinement of existing procedure; 
and in general to keep the staff apprised of the City-wide purchasing 
picture. 

3. Although every effort is made to process requisitions as quickly 
as possible, delays do occur primarily for the following reasons: 

a. Constant turnover in Purchasing Department and requi- 
sitioning department personnel. 

b. Necessity for continuous training of personnel because 
of 3a above. 

c. Insufficient information furnished with requisition. 

d. Lack of promptness by departments in submitting require- 
ments for annual contracts for timely bidding. This 
also applies for equipment that can be group purchased. 

4. In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish 
information that will indicate a standard of overall quality and useful I- 
ness suitable for actual use requirements, and to permit competitive bid- 
ding as required by the Charter and Administrative Code. The new form 
devised for this purpose makes it easier for departments to furnish de- 
sired information for bid purposes. 

5. As time is available, personnel are assigned to: 

a. Review specifications, forms, and procedures. 

b. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services where 
desirable. Term contracts added are as follows: 

a. Bus Shuttle Service - Airport 68250 

b. Maintenance Testing of Power Substation Units 77850 

c. Printing Administrative Code Supplements 95300 

d. Scavenger Service - Airport 84710 

e. Subpoenaing, Copying Business Records 68500 

f. Fittings, Cast Iron, Push-on Joints 76101 



5 - 



6. Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various 
services and commodities in general use by several departments or recur- 
ringly used by a department. The main advantages are elimination of the 
time lag resulting when individual bids are requested and elimination of 
the cost involved in individual bids. Term contracts must be periodically 
revised and specifications updated. New items are added as required. 

7. Major purchases included the following: 

Prop. § 

116 Trucks - Various Departments $33,544.50 

147 Police Motorcycles - Pol ice 51,516.36 
160 Sprocket and Chain Accessories - 

DPW - Water Pollution Control 57,516.36 
176 Portable Streetcar Track Conversion - Railway Monthly Lease 

178 Mobile Transceiver - Electricity 17,496.00 

179 Driver Education Trailer Simulators - SFUSD Term Cont. 
183 Transceiver, Portable - Electricity 16,164.00 

217 Cariopulmonary Resusitator - Health 18,969.50 

218 Tractor Loader (2) - Rec./Park 53,629.00 

220 Truck Sewer Cleaning - Public Works 18,042.39 

221 Truck, Eductor - Public Works 30,694.96 
226 Motorcycles - Police 92,866.24 
229 Loaders, Articulated - Rec./Park 18,404.49 

233 Airport Rescue Vehicle - Airport 78,803.00 

234 Gate Valves - Water Dept. 21,600.00 
236 Fire Trucks - S.F.F.D. 132,233.00 

242 Pump, Non-Clog - Public Works 10,232.00 

243 Road Grader - Airport 27,750.00 
250 Computer-Assisted Command and Control 

System - S.F.F.D. 1,575,864.00 

260 Trucks - Various Departments 141,081.66 

265 Street Sweepers - Pub I ic Works 105,740.00 

266 Automobiles - Various Departments 115,538.68 

267 Trucks - Various Departments 367,191.43 
292 Viewer, X-Ray, Motorized - Health 413,953.60 
322 Sewer Pump - Pub I ic Works 18,484.00 
328 Asphalt Roller - Public Works 17,900.00 
330 Trucks - Various Departments 121,301.58 
336 Scooters - Pol ice 14,672.00 
347 Microfilming Bldg. Records - Public Works 260,625.00 
349 Pavement Roller - Airport 15,372.00 
369 Trucks - Various Departments 72,510.34 
380 Manhole Frames & Covers - Hetch Hetchy 25,810.00 
383 Pumps - Water Department 88,800.00 
388 Railway Timber Ties - Railway 667,287.50 
418 Trucks - Various Departments 101,441.71 
429 Broadcast Transmitting System - SFUSD 21,000.00 
441 Trucks - Various Departments 44,887.39 

443 Street Sweeper - Public Works 35,658.00 

444 Communication System for S.F. Zoo 54,276.00 
471 Aircraft Noise Monitoring System - Airport 159,200.00 



- 6 - 



8. The commodity buyer for janitorial supplies is a permanent mem- 
ber of a committee for the evaluation of such products. The membership 
of the committee is comprised of the supervisors of custodial services 
from all City departments. The committee has been meeting monthly since 
October 1970 and much progress has been made in standardizing janitorial 
products. A primary example is in floor finish where a term contract 
has been established and the number of brands used throughout the City 
at any one time has been reduced from fifteen to one. A system of ex- 
tensive testing of all janitorial products has been instituted by the 
committee and interested parties are encouraged to submit their products 
for testing. 



- 7 - 



CODING DIVISION 



The Coding Division, under the Bureau of Buying, continues the de- 
velopment of the material and supplies identification coding system. 
The system is now used by all requisitioning departments. 

Considerable savings to the City in money, material, delivery time, 
and much follow-up correspondence has been realized from the inspection, 
by the Coding Section, of all incoming requisitions for material, sup- 
plies and equipment. By checking the Purchaser's item identification 
code number against the item and description, discrepancies are discovered 
in part numbers, sizes, prices, quantities, etc. These errors are cor- 
rected by coding and the involved department notified. 

In our system, we have a group and class covering the casting of 
various parts used on certain City equipment. We are investigating the 
possibility of reactivating this type of procurement on certain items, 
which could possibly result in a considerable savings to the City as well 
as providing an additional source of supply. Involved departments as 
well as vendors have been notified and are assisting in the project. 

Because of constant change in personnel throughout the City depart- 
ments, we have developed sample requisitions for those new employees who 
will be required to write their department material and supplies requi- 
sitions. This method, plus our regular instructional procedures, will 
help them considerably. 

Due to the many requests for new code numbers and the cancellation 
of certain codes by the departments, constant changes and additions have 
been made. The departments affected by these changes have been notified. 

The Coding Division lost half of its strength on the retirement of 
the Coding Supervisor in early 1974. The many man-hours and long years 
spent in establishing the coding system is in jeopardy, since funds for 
his replacement have been frozen. With the anticipated retirement 
in early 1975 of the other member of the Coding Division, this most bene- 
ficial service to the City will have to be curtailed or discontinued. 
Present department strength does not allow shuffling of personnel from 
other equally critical operations. 



- 8 - 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS 



Anna Gibbons - Chief Clerk 
Florence White - Principal Clerk 



Traveling Monthly Repetitive Purchase Orders are processed in 
Requisitions: quantity on a repeat basis. These are large numbers 
of requisitions as used by Public Health, Public 
Utilities, Public Works, Purchasing, Recreation and 
Park, Schools, Sheriff, Library, Controller, S.F. Com- 
munity College, Airport and Port Commission. 



Purchase Purchase orders are prepared by a Xerox process 
Orders: directly from the Requisition, thus assuring accuracy 

and speed of processing. 



Tabulation A microfilmed record of all bids received by Purchasing, 
of Bids: 



Requisition Cumulative runs of this register are made daily, weekly 
Register: and monthly and are indispensable in locating requisi- 
tions processed for purchase order. 



Vendor Index: An alphabetical listing of purchase orders by Vendor 
kept on a continual basis. 



Codes on Use of Vendor Location Code, Buyer Code and Commodity 
Purchase Orders: Code continual. 



Bid Index: An informational source document showing all bid items 
on a commodity basis. 

The number of purchase orders to be prepared is not constant, chiefly 
due to the fact that requisitions do not flow into the department in a 
uniform manner. Consequently, there are times when a high production may 
be desired when personnel is depleted by vacations (which cannot be spread 
over the normal vacation period due to conditions beyond our control), 
sickness, or otherwise. Our very limited temporary funds must be used in 
even more critical areas and at more critical times/ 

Sales of Charters, Codes and other documents increased from $16,946.00 
in 1972-73 to $18,785.00 in 1973-74. 

1972-73 1973-74 



Discounts earned amounted to: $84,577.56 $74,868.66 



- 9 - 



Bureau of Personnel and Accounts (Continued) 



The Accounting Section is responsible for the department budget; 
encumbrance requests for contractual services for general office and re- 
production; quarterly sales tax returns; monthly fuel use tax returns; 
monthly gas and oil distribution reports; processing of inter-depart- 
mental work orders; security of counter sales funds; departmental revolv- 
ing fund purchases; departmental pay check distribution; and regular 
accounting duties. 



- 10 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 



The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a 
central warehouse and storerooms in various City Departments; receives 
and issues materials, supplies and equipment for all departments of the 
City and County of San Francisco. This Bureau arranges for the sale of 
and sells surplus and obsolete personal property belonging to the City; 
exchanges equipment between departments and maintains a perpetual inventory 
of all materials purchased for the City and County of San Francisco. 
The Bureau maintains control of the entire automotive fleet, including the 
listing, insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the Bureau of 
Stores and Equipment: 

Name and Location Type Amount of Inventory 

Central Warehouse - 15th & Harrison Sts. Stationery $ 12,979-68 

Janitorial Supplies 7,990.64 
4000 Cases Foodstuffs 
Misc. Furniture 
Pipe, etc. 

Dept. Public Works - 2323 Army St. 151,000.00 

Water Department - 1990 Newcomb Ave. 523,769-54 

Hetch Hetchy - Moccasin, Calif. 49,876.43 

S.F. Intl. Airport - So. San Francisco 57,481.32 

Municipal Railway - 24th & Utah Sts. and 349. 541.18 

2 sub-stores 

General Stores ) 

Washington & Mason ) 352,159-79 

Potrero and one sub-store 127,414.20 

Health Dept. - S.F. General Hospital, 239,837.00 

22nd & Potrero 

Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dewey 451,691-00 

Recreation & Park - Golden Gate Park 39,470.00 

Dept. Electricity - 901 Rankin St. 74,974.89 

Sheriff - 153,526.57 

Central Shop Store - Hall of Justice Garage (Sub-Store) 38,045.00 

* Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory 



-II- 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division is staffed by the 
f o 1 1 ow i n g : 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

12 Senior Storekeepers 
20 Storekeepers 
_9 Assistant Storekeepers 
TOTAL 47 



SALES DIVISION 

Fifteen sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the authority 
of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal research into 
various aspects of different sales, preparation of sales, inviting interested 
buyers to bid, opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all 
money received from buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of 
correspondence relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of 1973-7*+ was $2,028,099-38. 

A general breakdown of the sales is as follows: 

IBM Cards, Waste Paper $ 4,589-96 

Sacks, Containers 66.43 

Grease and Bones 2,419.04 

Steel Drums 208.00 

Elec. Crane Car 1,1 19. 3^ 

Scrap Metal 9,266.24 

Scrap Iron 5.837.15 

Cars - Trucks 19,581.05 
Computers 1,976,269-50 

Fire Hose 2,042.83 

X-Ray Film 5,791 .57 

Fire Extinguishers 820.68 

Drain Oi 1 " 86.61 

Mi seel laneous 1 . 00 



- 12 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



INVENTORY DIVISION 

This division has the assignment of maintaining the Equipment 
Inventory of all City Departments; the investigation and reports to the 
Board of Supervisors on lost, damaged, or stolen items of equipment. We 
conducted surveys of Departments and updated the Perpetual Inventory 
Records. A physical inventory of equipment in Model Cities Agencies was 
continued during the fiscal year. 

We estimated or secured estimates from moving concerns for various 
moves required by City Departments or Agents. We recommend procedure, 
confer and set the dates and requirements for moving or other 1 iason detai 

The accumulation of various Waste materials, such as Waste paper 
(office records, Tab Cards (l.B.M.), X-Ray film, and miscellaneous scrap 
metal is gathered up by this Division for arrangement of disposal by sale. 
Surplus furniture and equipment that has further use is made available to 
other City Departments by transfer. We pick-up and deliver surplus equip- 
ment and provide delivery of office supplies to City departments. 



- 13 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 

STORES DIVISION 

The Stores Division has had the following personnel changes during 
the past fiscal year: We received from the lists a 1934 Storekeeper who 
was assigned to S.F. General Hospital; a 1936 Senior Storekeeper was 
appointed to the Airport storeroom; a 1934 Storekeeper was appointed to 
Central Shops storeroom. A 1932 storekeeper left the S.F. General Hospital 
to accept a call as a Muni bus operator. A 1920 Inventory Clerk resigned 
from the Central Warehouse. These changes were during the month of August. 

During September a 1934 Storekeeper was given a 1936 Senior Store- 
keeper temporary appointment to the Muni Potrero Store. A laborer's job 
at the Central Warehouse was reclassified when the employee retired, and 
a new classification of 1932 Assistant Storekeeper was assigned to this job. 

In the month of October two recently vacated jobs were filled: one, 
a 1920 Inventory Clerk from the list was placed at Central Warehouse and 
a 1932 Assistant Storekeeper was sent to S.F. General Hospital. 

In November a very worthy and efficient 1934 Storekeeper, James Kopas 
passed away. From the lists we received a 1934 Storekeeper assigned to the 
Park Storeroom and another 1934 was placed at the Muni 24th & Utah Sts. 
Storeroom, together with a 1932 Assistant Storekeeper (temporary) assigned 
to the Laguna Honda Hospital Storeroom. 

During December, after being vacant for some time, we were fortunate 
to receive from the list a 1446 Senior Clerk Stenographer giving us a full 
complement of employees at the Central Warehouse office. 

In January the temporary Muni - Potrero 1936 Senior Storekeeper 
position was made a permanent appointment. 

A 1932 Assistant Storekeeper (temporary) position was made permanent 
in February, and a 193*+ Storekeeper on probation who failed to pass was 
returned to his former position as a 1932 Assistant Storekeeper. 

A position as a 1934 Storekeeper was filled in April at the Central 
Shops storeroom. A 1934 Storekeeper left the Muni- Ocean Ave. store to 
accept an appointment as a truck driver for the Department of Public Works. 

In May a vacancy for a 1934 Storekeeper position was filled at the 
Muni - Potrero store. 

During June a 1932 Assistant Storekeeper left to accept an appoint- 
ment as a 9102 Car Cleaner for the Muni and another 1932 from S.F. General 
Hospital accepted a promotion to the School Department as a 7550 Furniture 
Serviceman. Retiring also was John Spittle, a long time and efficient 



- 14 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 

193^ Storekeeper who was assigned to the Kirkland Muni Bus facility. 

GENERAL : 

Plans are going ahead for the new consolidated bus repair facility 
at 22nd and Indiana Sts. which will include modern and efficient storeroom 
facilities to replace the 2Uth & Utah Sts. Muni installation. 

Also in the planning stage is the replacement of the streetcar 
repair shops of the Muni at Ocean Avenue with new storerooms to serve this 
1 oca t i on . 

The new S.F. General Hospital is well on its way towards completion 
with its centrally located storeroom to replace the many and widely scattered 
small storage locations in the old hospital. 

New record keeping and reporting under the California Occupational 
Safety and Health Act of 1973 were instituted in the various stores 
faci 1 i ties. 

Safety literature and other suggestions and advice were relayed to 
the storekeeping personnel on a continuing basis at the various storerooms 
of the Bureau of Stores and Equipment of the Purchasing Department. 



- 15 - 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 



The Reproduction Bureau provides centralized service to all 
City Departments for photography, offset printing, mimeo- 
graphing, blueprinting, microfilming and self service copiers. 

Funds to operate the Bureau are provided by Work Orders from 
the Departments. There were many increases in the price of 
supplies and contractual services within the past year. 
These coupled with increases in the amounts of forms and 
reports and increased complexity work required brought our 
charges up from $227,000 in 72-73 to $256,000 in 73-74; an 
increase of twelve per cent. Overall production remained 
approximately the same, although, there is a steady increase 
in the number of short run jobs on offset. 100 copies of 
ten originals takes longer than 1000 copies of one, but, in 
our statistics, we show 1000 on both. 

We have succeeded in getting more plates per roll of Itek 
platematerial and still the use has gone up; 70-71 - 70 rls, 
71-72 - 80 rls, 72-73 - 88 rls, 73-74 - 96 rls. This shows 
an increase in the number of short run jobs, something not 
reflected in our statistics. 

Warren Wong, for many years the Sr. Offset Machine Operator 
and for a time Manager, left to take another position. 
His skills and experience are still missed. 

Frank Alberico retired after 25 years as Sr. Blueprint 
Operator. He took with him a considerable fund of knowledge 
that was very valuable. 

Several pieces of equipment are showing signs of wear and 
have required considerable service and parts. We look forward 
to replacement of worn and obsolescent equipment. 

The price of wet process blueprint paper increased 67% this 
year. The overall cost of blueprints is rising and the 
departments are advised (again) to seek alternatives. 

Over the past two years or so, we improved the turn-around 
time. As a result, many departments have come to expect 
quicker service. Frequently, because of heavy workloads 
(which rise and fall unpredictably) we can not meet that 
expectation. It is suggested that departments plan their 
reproduction needs as far ahead as possible. 



16 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 



Fire Apparatus Shop 

Electr i c Shop 
Pattern Shop 
Pa int Shop 
Upholstery Shop 

Truck (Heavy Equipment) Shop 

Quint St. Gas Station 

19* Avenue Gas Station 

Quint St. Tire Shop 

Department of Electricity Garage 

Army St. (D.P.W.) Station 

Automot i ve Shop 

Hall of Justice Station 

Recreation & Park Shop 

Concl us i on 

F i scal Statement 

F i scal Chart 

Organizational Chart 

Vehicle Inventory Chart 



- 17 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

The Central Shops, and allied facilities, provioe necessary mechanical 
maintenance and repair service for all clty departments and bureaus, 
except Public Utilities. 

In addition, it is the responsibility of the Bureau to inspect, appraise, 
and make recommen oat i ons on all clty owned vehicles contemplated for 

replacement; AID THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS IN THE WRITING OF VARIOUS 

specifications; and to receive and approve all new vehicles delivered 
to the City and County of San Francisco. 



Administration and major repair facilities are located at the Central 
Shops, 800 Quint Street. 

Other Central Shops operations include Golden Gate Park Shop, providing 
maintenance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; Hall of 
Justice Service Station, where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police 
and other City cars, along with inspection and light maintenance for 
Police vehicles. Department of Public Works, Army Street Yard, where fuels 
lubricants, preven ten t i ve maintenance and inspection is provideo Public 
Works vehicles. 19^ Avenue Public Works Station, Health Department 
Garage and Department of Electricity Garage. 

Administration of the Shops, under the Purchaser of Supplies, is the 
direct responsibility of mr . albert m. flaherty, general superintendent, 
aided by Mr. Edmond A. Rames, City Shops Assistant Superintendent. 

The Central Shops, Quint Street operation, has four main maintenance 

shop areas. They are 1) Automobile, 2) Truck, 3) Fire Apparatus, 

k) Machine; and the following auxiliary shops: Blacksmith, Pattern 

and Ladder Shop, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body an o Fender, Tire, and 
Service Sta t i on . 

Along with the responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of 
mechanical equipment in school buildings, sewage plants, pumping stations, 
public buildings, etc., the shops maintain 267*+ motorized units of the clty 
owned fleet. these vehicles and machines are valued at approximately 
7.6 million dollars. 

The Bureau is staffed with 1C3 permanent employees, of which 83 are 
interdepartmental. four (k) craftsmen, employed these past several 
years with extra funds, were declared permanent by action of the clvil 
Service Commission, this past fiscal year. They consist of one ( 1 ) 
7309 - Car & Auto Painter, one (1) 7381 - Automotive Mechanic and two 
(2) Automotive Machinists. Cne (1) 7381 - Automotive Mechanic (temporary) 
was assigned late in the fiscal yea-,, to preventive maintenance and 

SERVICE OF FOLICE MOTORCYCLES. ThIS POSISION WAS FUNDED BY A WORK ORDER 

budgeted through the police department. one (1) 7313 - automotive 
Machinist (temporary) was assigned to the Recreation and Park Department 
Shop during the second half of the fiscal year with work order funds 
provided by that department. 



18 - 



FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 

The Fire Shop is staffed with eight Automotive Machinists, three Metal- 
smiths, three Painters, two Pattern Makers, one Body and Fender Man and 
one Automotive Serviceman. 

One Foreman, Mr. A. Del Negro and one Sub-Foreman, Mr. Ray Monti, oversee 
and control the maintenance and repair of all apparatus and equipment used 
by our fire fighting force. 

This Shop processed a total of 1095 major jobs through various work areas 
for the year. 87^ units of fire apparatus were repaired an0 returned to 

SERV ICE. 

The Field Service man responded to 1982 service calls and completed 1612 
repairs in fire houses without necessitating the apparatus b e i n g our of 
service for any appreciable time. 

Shop personnel responded to 127 battery service calls in the field and 
lubricated an0 serviced 283 units of fire apparatus in the shop. 

One Automotive Machinist is assigned to the San Francisco Airport. He 
repairs and maintains all the apparatus and equipment used by our fire 
0ighting forces at the airport. 



NCLUDED IN THE TOTAL JOBS COMPLETED FOR THE FIRE DEPARTMLLT WERE: 

8 MAJOR ENGINE OVERHAULS 
135 MINOR ENGINE OVERHAULS AND/OR REPAIRS 
172 FIRE PUMP GATES, GAUGES, VALVES, ETC. 

6 FIRE PUMP MODIFICATIONS - PRESSURE RELIEF VALVES 

4 MAJOR PUMP OVERHAULS - SUCTION SCREENS AND FOREIGN PARTICLE 
THROUGH I MPELLERS 

8 TRANSMISSION OVE HAULS 
18 CLUTCH REPLACEMENTS 
23^ BRAKE REPAIRS - RELINE - AIR COMPRESSORS - AIR LEAKS - AIR 
GOVERNORS 
86 COMPLETE ENGINE TUNE-UPS 
92 CHASSIS REPA I RS 
37 AERIAL REPAIRS 

5 PIECES OF APPARATUS CANNIBALIZED FOR PARTS 
55 RADIATOR REPAIRS 

13 WATER TANKS - SAND BALST - WELD TANKS AND COAT WITH RUST 
RESISTANT EPOXY 



One American La France aerial tractor re-powered with a Detroit diesil 
6-71 engine, coupled with an allison automatic ht70 transmission. 
Tractor up-dated and re-fitted with compartments and cab top. 

Major project completed this fiscal year by the Fire Apparatus Shop was 
the outfitting and placing in service, 13 pumpers, k aerials, 1 snorkel 
and k mini-pumpers (grass burning units). 

£lh:ctric Shop - 2^3 Electrical repairs 

Generators, alternators, regulators, starte s, sirens, revolving lites. 
Also repairs ano overhauls small equipment such as chain saws, metal and 
cement cutting saws, electric power plants, high intensity spot lites, 



- 19 - 



cords, battery chargers, small water pumps, water vacuum pumps, etc. 

Pattern Shop 

repaireo 63 ladders - made 15 new ladders, 12 new patterns, 36 gleason 
saddles (new equipment) and 60 chock blocks (new equipment). 

Inspection of the fire department ladders is made by the Pattern Shop 
in the field. Any ladder that does not come up to specifications is replaced 
and brought to the shop for repairs and re-finishing. included are crouch 
poles, pike poles and ceiling hooks. 

Repaired old and damaged patterns, modified old patterns and made up new 
patterns for other departments and sub-shops. 

Made up new patterns for rocker type hose butt wrenches. 

This shop also made various size blocks and wedges, pegs, small tool and 
equipment boxes, COMPARTMENT PARTITIONS, duck boards, holoers, cabinets 
and repaired furniture. 

Paint Shop 



Touch up and spot paint all accident repairs including lettering and gold 
leaf. Items made in the Pattern Shop and Blacksmith Shop, also motor 
parts and assemblies from the main flre shop. 

Included are - 53 ladders refinished, 3 fire engines complete, 12 D.P.W. 

vehicles complete, 25 Street Cleaning buggies, 15 Street tool box trailers, 

k Street Repair tool heaters, 3 aerial ladders and 180 repair and spot 
paint (accidents). 

Metaj_smit_ h Shop 

Manufactured new tools, repaired damaged tools. Repair vehicle bodies, 
trailers, straighten bumpers, metal ladders, brackets, hose fittings and 
adapters, high pressure valves, valve stems, water keys, wrenches, 
castings, etc. 

Make new metal compartments, partitions, boxes, aerial tiller cabs, construction 

of new running boards, doors and chassis parts. welding of brackets, tools, 

valve and fittings, pipe and flanges, machinery alid machinery parts for 
other departments. 

Also repaired in this Shop, are the fire apparatus accidents. 

JJpho_ls_te:ry Shop 

Fabricated are belts and straps for all purposes used by the Fire Department. 
Combination belts worn by Firemen to hold axes, flashlights, hydrant wrenches, 
and hose wrenches. flreman safety belts, ladder belts and equipment hold 
down belts. 

Make up and repair waterproof covers for Fire Department equipment. Various 
size canvas and straps, life net, stokes baskets, etc. 

Repair and upholster seats for all shops. 



Repair and fabricates leather boxes for walkie-talkie radios used by SFPD 
and SFFD. 

- 20 - 



TRUCK (HEAVY EQUIPMENT) SHOP 

The function of this Central Shops unit ranges from minor preventive 
maintenance trhough major re-construction and rebuilding of engines, 
bodies, chassis menbers, hydraulic systems and auxiliary appurtenances 
mounted on a widely diversified and highly specialized fleet of heavy 
duty motorized equipment. 

a partial list of equipment serviced here incluoes tractors, paving layers, 
road scrapers, rollers, fork lifts, cranes, sewer eductors, mechanical 
sweepers, air compressors, back hoes, core drillers, paving saws, asphalt 
burners, construction devices large dump trucks, tankers, vans and passenger 

BUSES . 

Mr. Arthur Chin, Truck Shop Foreman, supervises this area, staffed by eleven 
Automotive Machinists and six Automotive Servicemen. 

During the year this section completed 1896 job orders. A partial list 
of the work performed is as follows; 
9 - Engines completely rebuilt 
64 - Engines overhauled 
294 - Brake systems overhauled 
105 - Radiator and cooling systems overhauled 
15 - Booy reconstruction jobs (accioents) 
87 - Starters rebuilt 
99 - Alternators/Generators rebuilt 
116 - Transmission repairs 
227 - Motor tune-ups 
12 - New ambulances were delivered to the Central Shops for use 
in the Emergency Hospital Service. Due to the demands of 
of the service and unique topography of our clty, it became 
necessary to make some extensive modifications on the 
vehicles. this was accomplished through the expertise of 
the Shop staff and with the cooperation of the. manufacturer. 



In addition the Truck Shop, through its supervisory staff, 
for the operations at four other sub-shops as follows: 



S RESPONS I BLE 



QUINT STREET GAS STATION 

Gasoline dispensed 
Oil (dispensed 
Vehicles lubricated 



142,700 Gallons 
13,010 Quarts 
1,217 



19 tt AVENUE GAS STATION 

Gasoline dispensed 
Oil d i spensed 
Vehicles lubricated 



49,268 Gallons 

1,587 QJARTS 
60 



QUINT STREET TIRE 

NEW TIRES MOUNTED AND RE-CAPS MOUNTED 1,793 

Tire repa i reo 537 

Road Calls (tire services) 260 



DEPT. OF ELECTRICITY (GARAGE) 

Lubes and services 

Road Calls (tires, stalls, etc.) 



221 
47 



21 



ARMY STREET (DPW) STATION 

This service facility is located in the D.P.W. maintenance yard 
at 2323 Army Street. 

Its function is to provide minor maintenance and repairs, preventive 
maintenance and fuels and lubricants to the fleet of the department of 
Public Works automotive equipment. Services are available from 7:00 A.M. 
to midnight, five (5) days per week. 

The station is staffed with one Automotive Machinist, four Automotive 
Servicemen and one Sub-Foreman, Mr. Elmer Bryden. 

The fiscal year saw 233^ various repair and service jobs completed. 
297,180 gallsons of gasoline were dispensed along with 1,329 gallsons 

OF KEROSENE, 3,778 GALLONS OF LUBE OIL AND 508 GALLONS DIESEL FUEL. 

MACHINE SHOP 

The machine shop is another vital branch of the Central Shops. Staffed 
with nine Maintenance Machinists supervised by Mr. John Raos, the Shop 
Foreman . 

The principal function of this unit is the manufacture of new and 
replacement parts for machinery and mechanical equipment of all types 
including the repair, serviceing, adjustment, fitting and assembly of 
the ae0ve classes of equipment in the field, as well as in the shop. 

Three fully equipped mobile units are on call to serve the needs of 
various City departments and installations, such as the Fublic Schools 
where our machinists maintain, repair and service the heating and 
ventilating machinery, classroom machine tools and equipment of the 
Industrial Arts Shops. 

In addition, our Machinists manufacture and maintain the highly specialized 
tools and equipment used by our fire fighting forces, including the Fire 
Department pumping stations ano the high pressure water system. The 
shop is also responsible for the distribution, maintenance and repair 

OF FIRE HOSE AND FITTINGS. 29000 FT. (APPROX. ^'z MILES) OF NEW HOSE 

was tested, labeled and distributed throughout the clty. 20000 ft. was 
restored to service after repairs. 37 automatic fire house doors were 
repaired and adjusted during the fiscal year. 

Another vital function of this Shop is the maintenance and repair of the 
mechanical equipment related to the city's sewage disposal system of the 
Department of Public Works, where k of our Machinists are assigned full 
time making parts, adjustments and repairs to a wide variety of machinery 
in the City's three treatment plants and ten pumping stations in addition 
to the Golden Gate Park water reclamation and irrigation system and 
recreation facilities. 

a total of 9^0 job orders were processed through this central shops unit 

DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, L 97^ . MANY OF WHICH WERE OF AN 
EMERGENCY NATURE AFFECTING THE ClTY'S PUBLIC HEALTH, SAFETY AND GENERAL 
SERVICES. 

- 22 - 



AUTOMOTIVE SHOP 

The Shop is staffed with eight Automotive Mechanics, two Automotive 
Servicemen and one Automotive Machinist Foreman, Mr. Ed Franke. 

The Automotive Shop is responsible for repair and maintenance of 1289 
City owned vehicles, which include both passenger and light trucks to 
j)/k ton capacity. other vehicles maintained by this shop are 19 honda 
125 c.c. trail bike's for police, park and beach patrol, ^0 vespa 1 50 
c.c. motor scooters for police patrolling, 8 cushman three wheel cycles 
for traffic units and 8 vehicles for driver training. 

major projects accomplished were the outfitting of 37 police unoercover 
vehicles, ko police patrol units with specially manufactured security 
partitions, hidden rear door locks, sirens, roof light bars and large 
identification numbers on the roof for vehicle communication with 
police helicopters. twenty used vehicles purchased from a lease company 
were outfitted for the flre department with roof lights and sirens. 
Four vehicles for the Sheriff Department were outfitted with roof 
lights and security secreen s for prisoner control and driver protection, 
new vehicles outfitted for various other departments totaled 218. 

The Automotive Shop remains certified as "OFFICIAL MOTOR VEHICLE 
POLLUTION CONTROL DEVICE INSTALLATION AND INSPECTION STATION" and 
"OFFICIAL HEADLAMP ADJUSTING STATION". 

A new "MARQUETTE EXHAUST EMISSION ANALYZER" along with our Sun Electronic 
Engine Tester will enable our mechanics to tune and adjust to factory 
ano air pollution specifications. 

a total of 20^- turn-in vehicles were stripped of reusable equipment 
ano made ready for sale. 

The total number of completed jobs this year were 358c, not to include 
special outfitting of new vehicles. a listing of completed jobs are 
73^+ brake jobs and safety inspection of drums, wheel cylinders and 
hydraulic lines. 723 tune-ups were completed and tested with our 
electonic engine analyzer for top performance. 114 radiators were 
repaired and cooling systems checked. 8^- automatic transmissions 
were serviced and adjusted to specifications for longer service. 
kk engines received valve grinds which included motor tune-ups. 26 
clutch jobs ano 20 complete engines were completely rebuilt. 

Accident repairs numbered 272, of these 7 were totalled. To expedite 
repairs to vehicles involved in accidents, parts are cannibalized from 
vehicles turned in or vehicles totalled oue to accidents. |n most 
cases vehicles are repaired ano returned to service in minimum time 
at minimum cost. 



23 - 



HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION 

This branch of the Central Shops is located on Bryant Street, west of 
the Hall of Justice. It provioes fuel and service to Police Department 

VEHICLES AND SUPPLIES GASOLINE ANO OIL TO OTHER ClTY VEHICLES. ThE 

station is operated 7 days a week from 7 a.m. to midnight and is 

staffed with nine automotive servicemen, two automotive mechanics ano one 

Automotive Mechanic Sub-Foreman, Mr. Harry Maker. 

The convenient down-town location and the accelerated useage of Police 
vehicles make this a high volume distribution point of fuel and lubricants 
for City veh i cles . 

The past year shows the following services performed: 1 j73-7^ 

Gasoline dispensed 

Police Department 564,632 Gallons 

Other Departments 13^,837 Gallons 

Total 569,^69 Gallons 

Oil d i spenseo 

Police Department 17,228 Quarts 

Other Departments 8o8 Quarts 

Total 1b, 036 Quarts 

Tow jobs 1,191 

Tires changed (new & recap) 1,97C 

Battery service (new & charged) 217 

Lube and service jobs 2,1^5 

Mechanical repairs 7,631 

Brake reline jobs 297 

Motorcycle Service 

Lube 252 

Tire changes 330 

Batteries 205 

Repairs 1,637 

Tows 137 

The motorcycle preventive maintenance and service program was improved 
upon at this station, with the assignment of an automotive mechanic 
to perform scheduled services and make emergency repairs on the 
growing fleet of various police motorcycles. 




- 24 - 



RECREATION AND PARK SHOP 

The Golden Gate Park Automotive and Heavy Equipment Shop, a branch of 
the Purchasing Department Central Shops, is located within the Park at 
Third Avenue and South Drive. 

Four (4) permanent and one (1) temporary automotive machinist, plus one 
(1) automotive serviceman under the supervision of mr. james elliot, 
Foreman, comprises the staff at this facility. 

During the fiscal year 1973-7^+, the Shop processeo and completed 1732 
job orders covering major and minor repairs to Park equipment. 

a partial list of major jobs accomplished includes the complete overhaul, 
and rebuilding of the following specialized heavy equipment: 

1. one mechanical street and road sweeping machine, 

including engine, drives and body . 

2. One two and one-half ton dump truck, engine, body 
and hydraulic hoist, completely rebuilt. 

3. one underwater weed cutting machine for lakes and 
ponds was re-designed and rebuilt. 

k . one beach sand cleaning machine was modified a'.o 
completely overhauled. 

5. two case bucket loaders were re-fitted and line 
bored at all load bearing points. 

6. One large "Wabco" road grader was re-fitted with a new 
cooling system and cab section. 

Included in the total of jobs completed were 5 7 6 repair and overhauls 
of small powered agricultural ad g r u n d s k e e p i n g equipment such as 
mowers, rototillers, h a mme r k n i v e s , chain saws, portable pumps ano 
miscellaneous garden tools. 

The service station branch of the Park Shop is responsible for fueling 

AND OIL ING THE ENTIRE R E C R E A T I N -P A R K FLEET. ThE YEAR CLOSED WITH 
130,000 GALLONS OF GASOLINE AND 667'' QUARTS OF OIL DISPENSED AT THIS 
INSTALLAT I ON . 



- 25 - 



CONCLUSION 



The fiscal year 1973-7^ saw an increase in activity by the Central 
Shops, with a total of 9»231 job oroers written and completed. 
Additionally 21,Oh-2 minor repair, preventive maintenance and 
inspections, tire repairs and chances, battery services and tow 
jobs were completed. 

as it has been in past years, we again find that the relationship 
between shop manpower ano equipment maintained is being further 
extended. slnce the last major management study of the central 
Shops by the John F. Forbes Company, in 1959, when 9^ employees 

MAINTAINED 1,573 UNITS OF EQUIPMENT, WE NOW MAINTAIN WITH 1 Ok 
EMPLOYEES 2,67^ UNITS. A 10$ INCREASE OF EMPLOYMENT AGAINST A 
70% INCREASE IN AUTOMOTIVE UNITS MAINTAINED. THIS RATIO MAKES 

IT INCREASINGLY DIFFICULT FOR THE SHOPS TO PERFORM OUR RESPONSIBILITIES 

IN THE MANNER THAT WE WOULD DESIRE. 

IT IS HOPED THAT the BUOGET AUTHORITIES WILL EVENTUALLY agree on 

the need for a reasonable replacement program for c i ty vehicles, 
our present policy does not provide for this. with few exceptions, 
vehicles are maintained in service far beyond their economical 
life expectancy, 

due to the increasing cost of automobiles, a tendency has developed 
to further minimize replacements and when replacements are approved 
to provide sufficient funds to purchase sub-compact cars. 

While it is true that these small vehicles are less costly to 
purchase and will consume somewhat less fuel, they will not provide 
us with the longevity of service we have enjoyed in the past. 

the gasoline shortage that developed ouring the past year, proved 
to be of critical concern to the shop. so that the ovehall 
monthly allocations of fuel to the clty might be equitably distributed 
to the using departments, it became necessary for the shop 
administration to coordinate all fuel orders of the various 
departments and place them with the fuel contractor. though this 
procedure took up many hours of shop administrative time, it 
carried the clty & county operations t-rough the fuel crisis 
without serious aoverse effects. 



26 



HOW CENTRAL SHOPS SPENT FUNDED DOLLARS 



DURING THE YEAR 1973-7^ 




GRAND TOTAL OPERATING COSTS $2,139,^0.00 



- 27 - 



July 1, 1 97^+ 



CENTRAL SHOPS - PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



ORGAN IZATIONAL CHART 



- 7150 General Superintendent of Shops 

- 7277 Assistant Superintendent of Shops 

- 1652 Senior Accountant 

- 1632 Senior Account Clerk 

- 1630 Account Clerk 

- 1222 Senior Payroll & Personnel Clerk 



RUCK SHOP 

1 - 725^ Foreman 

1 - 7313 Auto Machinist 

2 - 7^10 Auto Servicemen 

1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman - Station 



IRE SHOP 



2 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

ODY SHOP 

3 - Body & Fender Men 

LACKSMITH SHOP 

I - 7389 Metalsmith 

IACHINE SHOP 

1 - 7237 Maint. Machinist Foreman 

3 - 73^3 Maint. Machinist 

4 - 73^3 Maint. Machinist (Sewage Plant) 

2 - 73^3 Maint. Machinist (Schools) 

ATCHMAN 

3 - 7^+10 Auto Servicemen 

9 a AVENUE STATION 

1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

EPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY YARD 



PASSENGER SHOP 

1 - 72^9 Foreman 

8 - 7381 Auto Mechanic 

1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 
•1 - 7^+10 Auto Serviceman 
•1 - 7410 Auto Serviceman (health 

Garage) 

FIRE SHOP 

1 - 7254 Foreman 

1 - 7315 Sub-Foreman 

8 - 7313 Auto Machinist 

1 - 7313 Auto Machinist - Field 

Service 

1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

2 - 7358 Pattern Maker 

1 - 7387 Upholsterer 
k - 7309 Pa inter 

1-01 Chauffeur (Fire House 
Del i ver ies) 

HALL OF JUSTICE 

*1 - 7382 Sub-Foreman 

2 - 7381 Auto Mechan ic 

1 - 7381 Auto Mechanic M/C (Temp) 
*9 _ 7*t10 Auto Servicemen 

PARK SHOP 

1 - 7254 Foreman 
4 - 7313 Auto Machinist 
1 - 7313 Auto Machinist (XF) 
?1 _ 7^10 Auto Serviceman 



1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman 

PW YARD ( SERVICE STATION) 

1 - 7^12 Auto Serviceman Sub-Foreman 

2 - 7^10 Auto Servicemen (Night Gas) 

1 - 7^10 Auto Serviceman (Night PM) (Assigned from Bur. of Stores & Equip.) 
1 - 7315 Auto Machinist - Sub-Foreman 1 _ ^^ General Storekeeper 

I - 7313 Auto Mach.nist (Night PM) 1 _ , g3k Storekeeper 



crmanent (Budgeteo) Positions 
:rmanent Inter-Departmental Positions 
:mporary (Extra Funded) Positions 

)TAL EMPLOYMENT 



19 

83 

2 

104 



28 - 



UNITS OF CITY-OWNED VEHICLES BY DEPARTMENT 
PER IBM INVENTORY RUN AS OF JAN. 1, 197*+ 



DEPT. 
NO. 

111 

113 
115 
117 
119 
121 

123 
131 

141 
145 
151 
154 
161 
165 
169 
170 
173 
181 
185 
187 
188 
213 
221 
223 
233 
243 
245 

255 

261 

265 
311 
312 



413 

if 15 

415.1 

417 

417.2 

421 

423 

424 

425 

427 

429 

431 



DEPARTMENT 

ADULT PROBATION 

ART COMMISSION 

ASSESSOR 

CITY ATTORNEY 

CITY PLANNING 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISS 

CONTROLLER 

S. F. DISASTER CORPS. 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

MAYOR 

MODEL CITIES PROG. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

SOCIAL SERVICES 

SINGLE MEN'S REHAB. 

SHERIFF 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

JUVENILE COURT 

J. C. LOG CABIN 

HIDDEN VALLEY SCHOOL 

CA. ACADEMY OF SCIENCi 

CHIEF ADMIN. OFFICER 

CORONER 

DEPT. OF ELECTRICITY 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR 

REAL ESTATE 

REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 

TAX COLLECTOR 

WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

PURCHASING-MAIN OFF I Cf 

PURCH-CENTRAL SHOPS 

DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 

ARCHITECTURE 
BLDG. INSPECTION 
F.A.C.E. PROGRAM 
BUILDING REPAIR 
TRAFFIC PAINTING 
ENGINEERING 
GENERAL OFFICE 
PERSONNEL ADM. 
SEWAGE PUMPING 
SEWAGE TREATMENT 
SEWER. REPAIR 
STREET CLEANING 



NO. OF 


DEPl 






NO. CF 


VEHICLES 


NO. 




DEPARTMENT 


VEHICLES 


7 


535 




HEALTH CENTERS 


5 


1 


539 




PUB. HEALTH NURSING 


1 


2 


551 




EMERGENCY HOSPITALS 


19 


3 


553 




HASSLER HOSPITAL 


9 


2 


555 




LAGUNA HONDA HOSP. 


14 


ON 1 


557 




S. F. GEN. HOSPITAL 


11 


1 


561 




MENTAL ADMIN. 


3 


5 

7 

303 

6 


567 




MENTAL HEALTH 


6 










8 










350 










4 


611 




LEGION OF HONOR 


1 


37 


621 




DE YOUNG MUSEUM 


2 


2 


631 




PUBLIC LIBRARY 


9 


44 


651 




REC.&PARK - GENERAL 


154 


3 


651- 


■S 


REC.&PARK - NON-AUTO 


324 


16 
6 
1 


653 




CANDLESTICK PARK 


10 


661- 


s 

■B 


.F. UMIF IED SCHOOL DIST. 


10 
2 
7 

37 
3 
1 
1 
7 


JOHN O'CONNELL 


3 


661- 


■E 


SHOP TRUCKS 


15 


661- 


•F 


GARDNERS AUTOS, ETC. 


23 


661- 


■G 


DELIVERY TRUCKS 


13 


661- 


■H 


ADMIN ISTRATION 


7 


661- 


■J 


DELIVERY, FURNITURE 


6 


669 




CITY COLLEGE 


24 


9 
4 


775 




S.F. PORT COMMISSION 


66 


40 






r n a DTrwrM T or diidi ir l.n 


"IDI/C 



44 

5 

123 

27 

38 
3 
4 
3 

25 
121 

109 



DEPARTMENT O c 



681 DPW - STREET REPAIR 101 
683 BUREAU OF ENGINEERING 34 

686 DPW - TREE PLANTING 4_7 

SUB-TOTAL 2382 

161-T POLICE TRAIL B IKES 
161-M POLICE MOTORCYCLES 
161-S POLICE SCOOTERS 

GRAND TOTAL 2674 



PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

513 ADMINISTRATION 9 

525.1 COMM. DISEASE 2 

531 FOOD & SANITARY INSP. 24 



29 - 



APPENDIX 





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TABLE NO. I 
PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 



Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



General 



Education 



Hea I th 



Util ities 



15014 $ 12,103,524 



9326 



5335 



5627 



5,341,317 



4,788,134 



5,401,575 



14453 



9663 



5631 



5934 



$ 13,846,231 
7.075,882 
5,270,191 
6.941 ,909 



35302 $ 27,634.550 35681 $ 33,134,213 



1972-1973 



1973-1974 



Purchases by 
Encumbrance Request 



$ 49,261,958 



$ 53,824,210 



Purchases through 
Contract Certification 



1,061,552 



2,518,652 



TOTAL 



$ 89,477,075 



TABLE NO. 2 
EXPENDITURES 



Comparisons of expenditures with original budget for all appropriations 
except Personal Service for 1973-74. 



Budgeted and Encumbered 
Account Supplemented & Expended Surplus Deficit 



Contract Services 
3.31 1 .200.000 




$ 


62,726 


$ 


68,425 






$ 5,697 


Materials & Suppl 
3.31 1.300.000 


ies 




14,534 




15,366 






832 


Equipment 
3.31 1 .400.000 






2,766 




2,703 


$ 


63 




Premi urn Official 
3.31 1 .812.000 


Bonds 




7,400 




8,765 






1,365 


Premium Auto Insurance 
3.31 1 .813.000 




75,000 




52,294 


22 


,706 




Misc. Insurance 
3.31 1 .815.000 






44,825 




44,416 




409 




Membership 
3.31 1 .854.000 






952 




948 




4 




TOTAL 




$ 


208,205 


$ 


192,917 


$23. 


,182 


$ 7,894 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

^ANNUAL REPORT 



Fiscal Year 1974-75 



DOCUMENTS 

: 975 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



September, 1975 



ANNUAL REPORT 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and con- 
tractual services for all departments of the City and County, including 
City-owned utilities, the San Francisco Port Commission, the San Francisco 
Unified School District and the San Francisco Community College; repairs 
and maintains automotive and other equipment for the various departments, 
except Public Utilities, and for the School District as requested; oper- 
ates a central reproduction bureau for departments requiring its services; 
transfers to other departments for use or sells equipment and supplies no 
longer useful to any department of the City; maintains a perpetual inven- 
tory of equipment in the various departments; and operates central stores 
of the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the 
Shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on 
new products, specifications and prices. 

The Purchasing Department, during the fiscal year 1974-75, expended 
$32,992,695 through Purchase Orders, $74,841,892 through Emcumbrance Re- 
quests and approximately $3,000,000 through Certifications, for a total of 
approximately 108 million. Sales of Charters, Codes and other documents 
amounted to $16,610.00. 

Charges by the Reproduction Bureau for printing, mimeographing, blue- 
printing, etc., amounted to $337,495. Consideration should be given to the 
bureaus request for replacement of obsolete and inefficient equipment so 
they can reduce the cost to the departments and assume a greater part of 
the printing work load that is being sent to outside vendors. 

The Bureau of Central Shops furnished maintenance, repair and service 
for 2938 motorized units of the City-owned fleet. The total fleet is valued 
at approximately 8.5 million dollars. 

The number of gallons of gasoline dispensed increased slightly over 
the previous year from 1,216,617 to 1,438,270. 

The Bureau of Central Shops is encountering a problem in maintaining 
repair and service because of the increase in the average age of the 
vehicles in the City fleet. As the vehicles become older, they need more 
and more repair each year. 



The Bureau of Stores and Equipment staffs the City's major storerooms, 
maintains inventory control of City-owned equipment and is responsible for 
the sale of surplus City equipment and supplies. Sales of these items 
amounted to $241,255.30 during the past fiscal year. 

PERSONNEL 

Authorized positions totaled 206 permanent in four bureaus. The 
Organization Chart is shown in the Appendix. 

SUPERVISORY - June 30, 1974 

Administrative 

J. C. Gavin - Purchaser of Supplies 
Helen E. McManis - Secretary 
Janice L. Stovall, Sr. Clerk Typist 

BUREAUS 

Buying 

R. Tecco - Asst. Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head. 

R.C. Erickson - Senior Purchaser (Buying Staff) 

G.A. Clarke - Senior Purchaser (S.F. General Hospital) 

G.F. Burket - Senior Purchaser (Specifications & Standardization) 

James Breslin, Senior Purchaser (Municipal Railway) 

Judith M. Matranga - Coding Supervisor (acting) 

Equipment and Supplies 

J.H. Beck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 

Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor (Job vacant) 

Personnel and Accounts 

Anna Gibbons - Chief Clerk - Bureau Head 
Peter Pan - Senior Accountant 

Reproduction 

Edward Fundis - Reproduction Manager - Bureau Head 

Shops 

A.M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau Head 
E.R. Rames - Assistant Superintendent of City Shops 



- 2 - 



SEPARATIONS : 



Retired 



Name 

French, Frances V. 
Spittle, John W. 
Alberico, Frank 

Evans , Lawrence 
Torrano, James V. 
Gordon, Marion 
Cordini, Leonard J. 
Wagner, Phyllis C. 
Smith, Victor Y. 
Frantz, Joseph A. 

Dagnino, George 

Died 

Mc Clary, Lloyd L. 





Approx. Years 




Position 


City 


Service 


Date 


General Clerk Typist 




20 


7-1-74 


Storekeeper 




30 


7-1-74 


Senior Blueprinting Machine 








Operator 




22 


7-1-74 


Senior Storekeeper 




17 


8-1-74 


Automotive Serviceman 




31 


8-1-74 


Senior Clerk Typist 




10 


9-6-74 


Senior Storekeeper 




13 


10-1-74 


Senior Clerk Typist 




17 


3-1-75 


Senior Clerk 




27 


4-1-75 


Stores and Equipment 








Assistant Supervisor 




32 


4-1-75 


Car and Auto Painter 
Maintenance Machinist 


18 


29 
.935 


6-12-75 
6-10-75 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED 

The work accomplished in the fiscal year is described in more detail 
under the separate bureaus . 

Recapitulation is as follows: 



Bureau 


Unit 


1973-74 


1974-75 


Buying 


Purchase Orders 
Amount 


35,681 
33,134,213 


32,969 
32,992,494 




Encumbrance Req. 
Amount 


53,824,213 


74,841,892 




Contract Certi. 
Amount 


2,518,652 


*3, 000, 000 


Stores and 
Equipment 


Surplus Sales - 
amount 

Major Stores Op- 
erated 


2,028,099 
11 


241,255 
11 



*Estimate only 



- 3 - 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED (Continued) 



Bureau 



Shops 



Reproduction 



Unit 

Job Orders 
Expenditures 
Gasoline dispensed 

Services rendered 
Amount 



1973-74 

9,251 
$2,139,440 
1,216,017 gal. 



$ 256,000 



1974-75 

10,821 
$2,530,471.00 
1,438,270 



337,495 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

The Bureau of Buying, under the supervision of the Assistant Director 
of Purchasing and Services, is responsible for the procurement of supplies, 
equipment, services and insurance for all City departments, the San Fran- 
cisco Unified School District and the San Francisco Community College 
District. As requisitions are received from the various City agencies, 
they are converted either directly to purchase orders, as in the case of 
term contract items, or to formal or informal bids by the appropriate 
buyer according to commodity code. Generally, the procurement functions 
(outlined in detail in a previous report) are as follows: 

I. BUYING - BIDS AND AWARDS 

Evaluation by requisition document to determine type of procure- 
ment action to be taken; preparation of bids to include contrac- 
tual and technical requirements; analysis and award of bids. 

II. BUYING - RELATED FUNCTIONS 

Analysis of records of previous purchases specifically related to 
factors of average use; maintenance of individual specification 
files and library of pertinent catalogs and technical data; re- 
search on new items; preparation of new and review and/or revision 
of old term contracts; and procedural review. 

BUYING PERSONNEL 
The buying staff consists of the following personnel: 

1 - Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 
3 - Senior Purchasers 

7 - Purchasers 

2 - Purchasers (Printing) 

1 - Assistant Purchaser (Position Vacant) 



- 4 - 



OPERATIONS 

1. Purchasing workload is assigned to the individual buyer on a 
commodity basis with allowance for items of a special nature or in cases 
where seasonal peaks or vacations make it advisable to deviate from this 
policy. Budget equipment (OE 400 funds) is also spread throughout the 
buying staff to prevent an overload on any particular buyer. 

2. Periodic meetings of the buying staff are held to permit the 
exchange of ideas; the formulation of improved operating procedures; dis- 
cussions of mutual problems; review and refinement of existing pro- 
cedures; and in general to keep the staff apprised of the City-wide 
purchasing picture. 

3. The processing of requisitions has been expedited in the past 
year mainly through the stabilization of personnel in the Bureau of 
Buying and the Bid section. The filling of three 1952 Purchaser 
vacancies on a permanent basis has had a considerable positive effect 
in expediting purchases. There is still some problem in ordering 
departments caused by personnel turn-over but the problem appears to be 
abating. 

4. In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furn- 
ish information that will indicate a standard of overall quality and 
usefullness suitable for actual use requirements, and to permit com- 
petitive bidding as required by the Charter and Administrative Code. 
The new form devised for this purpose makes it easier for departments 
to furnish desired information for bid purposes. 

5. As time is available, personnel are assigned to: 

a. Review specifications, forms, and procedures. 

b. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services where 
desirable. Term contracts added during the past fiscal 
year, are as follows: 

(1) Motor Coach Parts Muni Railway 71425 

(2) Printing, Fast Pass (Muni Railway) 96950 

(3) Insulated Power Cable (Hetch Hetchy) 77900 

(4) Carbon Inserts 76200 

(5) Repairing Seat Covers 79950 

(6) Pipe & Fittings, P.V.C. & P.E. 75950 

(7) Air and Oil Filters 71609 

6. Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various 
services and commodities in general use by several departments or recur- 
ringly used by a department. The main advantages are elimination of the 
time lag resulting when individual bids are requested and elimination of 
the cost involved in individual bids. Term contracts must be periodically 
revised and specifications updated. New items are added as required. 



- 5 - 



7. Major purchases included the following: 



Prop. # 

417 
467 
474 
497 
515 
544 
545 
547 
559 
562 
565 
566 
573 
578 
582 
585 
590 
592 
610 
627 
632 
635 
638 
642 
645 
646 
662 
667 
673 
682 
687 
698 
717 
728 
752 
768 
772 
796 
813 
823 
825 
831 



Transit Power Sub-stations - Hetch Hetchy 

Uniform components - Railway 

Laundry Equipment - Sheriff 

Trucks - Various Departments 

Ductile Iron Fittings & Castings - D.P.W. 

Fire Alarm System - Fire Dept. 

Electric Motors - Water 

Gate Valves - Water 

Fire Trucks - Fire Dept. 

Truck, Sewer Cleaning - D.P.W. 

Diesel Motor Coaches - Muni Railway 

Recondition & Overhaul Pumps - D.P.W. 

Election Pamphlets - Reg. of Voters 

Fire Hose - Fire Dept. 

Transfer & Ticket Boxes - Muni Railway 

Freezers - S.F.U.S.D. 

Election Forms 

Portable Transceivers - Electricity 

Radio Paging System - Electricity 

Dental Chairs - Public Health 

Trucks - Various Departments 

Horizontal Boring & Facing Machine - College 

Powered Street Sweeper - D.P.W. 

Laboratory Sterilizer - Health 

Motorcycles & Scooters - Police 

Bus Transportation - S.F.U.S.D. Annual Est. 

Diesel Motor Parts - Railway 

Radio Transceivers - Electricity 

Power Cable Reel - Hetch Hetchy 

Automobiles - Various Departments 

Trucks - Various Departments 

Filing Equipment - Finance & Records 

Revolvers - Sheriff 

Emergency Medical System - Health 

High Pressure Hydrants - Fire 

Flocculant, Anionic Polymer - D.P.W. 

Vest, Bullet Resistant - S.F.P.D. 

Hospital Beds - Health 

Stretchers - Health 

Hospital Mattresses - Health 

Radio Communication System - Electricity 

Clamshell Bucket - Port Commission 



$5,896 


434 


00 


199 


266 


00 


22 


004 


00 


34 


,703 


45 


229 


442 


15 


97 


114 


00 


151 


430 


00 


128 


244 


00 


156 


462 


00 


58 


,185 


40 


5,633 


,600 


00 


28 


,534 


00 


41 


670 


00 


39 


625 


00 


20 


210 


00 


48 


600 


00 


27 


375 


00 


31 


,592 


12 


59 


,787 


50 


30 


910 


20 


72 


358 


08 


23 


,677 


50 


79 


980 


00 


19 


744 


00 


97 


142 


60 


5,000 


000 


00 


42 


977 


29 


54 


,662 


47 


20 


537 


50 


43 


921 


62 


46 


087 


86 


41 


878 


80 


21 


206 


52 


391 


708 


00 


217 


151 


55 


51 


000 


00 


179 


800 


00 


369 


728 


40 


25 


952 


00 


21, 


450 


25 


19 


973 


00 


25 


850 


00 



-6- 



8. The commodity buyer for ianitorial supplies is a permanent mem- 
ber of a committee for the evaluation of such products. The membership 
of the committee is comprised of the supervisors of custodial services 
from all City departments. The committee has been meeting monthly since 
October 1970 and much progress has been mac'e in standardizing janitorial 
products. A primary example is in floor finish where a term contract 
has been established and the number of brands used throughout the City 
at any one time has been reduced from fifteen to one. A system of ex- 
tensive testing of all janitorial products has been instituted by the 
committee and interested parties are encouraged to submit their products 
for testing. The past year has seen the standardization of floor 
cleaning and wax stripping compounds and determent sanitize r for use by 
all City departments. 

9. One of the major problems confronting the Bureau of Buying was 
the purchase of major equipment for the new facility at San Francisco 
General Hospital. Because of the technical nature of most of the equip- 
ment involved, many hours were spent with hospital personnel reviewing 
technical specifications, discussing products with manufacturers rep- 
resentatives, inspecting many samples of various types of equipment, 
evaluating performance, and in general assuring that the hospital obtained 
the best value for the money spent. As of June 30, 1975 87 purchase 
orders have been issued for major equipment with a value of approximately 
$845,456.00. These purchases were in addition to the regular equipment 
approved in the annual budget. 



-7- 



CODING DIVISION 

The Coding Division, under the Bureau of Buying, cannot continue 
the development of the material and supplies identification coding 
system, the system is now used by all requisitioning departments. 

Considerable savings to the City in money, material, delivery time, 
and much follow-up correspondence had been realized from the inspection, 
by the Coding Section, of all incoming requisitions for material, sup- 
plies and equipment. By checking the Purchaser's item identification 
code number against the item and description, discrepancies are dis- 
covered in part numbers, sizes, prices, quantities, etc. These errors 
were corrected by coding and the involved department notified. 

Due to the retirement of the Coding Supervisor in early 1974 
(a position for which funds are still frozen), and the subsequent re- 
tirement in early 1975 of the 1406 Senior Clerk in the Coding Division, 
the functions of the operation have been drastically curtailed. 

A 1404 Clerk, recently assigned to this function, has, through her 
own perseverence and personal ability, been able to maintain the system 
in an operational state and provide essential coding data to the various 
departments. An outstanding example of the effort involved was the com- 
plete review and cataldging of all medical items used at San Francisco 
General Hospital. 

It is anticipated that this position will again be vacated due to 
the promotion of the incumbant to a position outside the 
Purchasing Department. Based on the present "lag" time in filling 
positions, and reduced staffing because of frozen funds the coding function 
will probably be discontinued. 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS 



Anna Gibbons - 



Chief Clerk 

Principal Clerk (vacant) 



Traveling 
Requisitions: 



Monthly Repetitive Purchase Orders are processed in 
quantity on a repeat basis. These are large numbers 
of requisitions as used by Public Health, Public 
Utilities, Public Works, Purchasing, Recreation and 
Park, Schools, Sheriff, Library, Controller, S.F. Com- 
munity College, Airport and Port Commission. 



Purchase 
Orders: 



Purchase orders are prepared by a Xerox process 
directly from the Requisition, thus assuring accuracy 
and speed of processing. 



Tabulation 
of Bids : 



A microfilmed record of all bids received by Purchasing, 



Requisition Cumulative runs of this register are made daily, weekly 

Register: and monthly and are indispensable in locating requisi- 

tions processed for purchase order. 

Vendor Index: An alphabetical listing of purchase orders by Vendor 

kept on a continual basis. 



Codes on 
Purchase Orders 



Use of Vendor Location Code, Buyer Code and Commodity 
Code continual. 



Bid Index: An informational source document showing all bid items 

on a commodity basis. 



The number of purchase orders to be prepared is not constant, chiefly 
due to the fact that requisitions do not flow into the department in a 
uniform manner. Consequently, there are times when a high production may 
be desired when personnel is depleted by vacations (which cannot be spread 
over the normal vacation period due to conditions beyond our control), 
sickness, or otherwise. Our very limited temporary funds must be used in 
even more critical areas and at more critical times. 

Sale of Charters, Codes and other documents: 

1973-74 1974-75 



$18,785.00 
Discount earned amounted to: 
1973-74 



$74,868.66 



$16,610.00 



1974-75 



$107,888.76 



- q - 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS (Continued) 

The Accounting Section is responsible for the department budget; 
encumbrance requests for contractual services for general office and re- 
production; quarterly sales tax returns; monthly fuel use tax returns; 
monthly gas and oil distribution reports; processing of inter-depart- 
mental work orders; security of counter sales funds; departmental revolv- 
ing fund purchases; departmental pay check distribution; and regular 
accounting duties. 



- 10 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 



The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a 
central warehouse and storerooms in various City Departments; receives 
and issues materials, supplies and equipment for all departments of the 
City and County of San Francisco. This Bureau arranges for the sale of 
and sells surplus and obsolete personal property belonging to the City; 
exchanges equipment between departments and maintains a perpetual inventory 
of all materials purchased for the City and County of San Francisco. 
The Bureau maintains control of the entire automotive fleet, including the 
listing, insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the Bureau of 
Stores and Equipment: 



Name and Location 



Type 



Amount of Inventory 



Central Warehouse 



Dept. Public Works 
Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 
S.F. Intl. Airport 
Municipal Railway 



Health Dept. 



Recreation S Park 

Dept. Electricity 

Sheriff 

Central Shop Store 



15th & Harrison Sts. Stationery $ 13,827.80 

Janitorial Supplies 6,007.71 

- 2323 Army St. 175,388.50 

- 1990 Newcomb Ave. 735,929.13 

- Moccasin, Calif. 53,805.60 

- So. San Francisco 73,967.17 

- 2*+th & Utah Sts. and 573,5^+6.63 
2 sub-stores 

General Stores ) 

Washington & Mason ) 362,815.50 

Potrero and one sub-store 127,795.36 

- S.F. General Hospital, 221,503.00 
22nd & Potrero 

Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th & Dewey 63^,^10.00 

- Golden Gate Park ^2,939.00 

- 901 Rankin St. 77,07^.60 

179,358.35 

- Hal! of Justice Garage (Sub-Store) U2,009.10 



- 11 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division is staffed by the 
f ol lowing: 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

12 Senior Storekeepers 
21 Storekeepers 
9 Assistant Storekeepers 
TOTAL TO 



SALES DIVISION 

Twenty-three sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the 
authority of Section 7.100 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal 
research into various aspects of different sales, preparation of sales, 
inviting interested buyers to bid, opening and awarding of bids, collecting 
and depositing all money received from buyers with the City Treasurer and 
keeping records of correspondence relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of 197^-75 was $2^1,255.30. 

A general breakdown of the sales is as follows: 

Cars - Trucks $ 39,221.02 

X-Ray Film 3,123.75 

Drums 2U2.75 

Paper - IBM Cards 10,0^+3.10 

Fire Hose 2,726.50 

Waste Oil 883.99 

Scrap Iron 16,661.80 

Grease & Bones 3, i +87. i +9 

Sacks 66.23 

Copper Wire 17,239.85 

Computers 1^+6,^75.00 

Duplicator ^75.00 

Brass 586. 80 

Miscellaneous 22.02 



- 12 - 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



INVENTORY DIVISION 

This division controls the Equipment Inventory of all City Depart- 
ments! new equipment purchases are recorded and necessary papers are 
forwarded to Departments. We investigate and report to the Board of 
Supervisors on lost, damaged, or stolen items of equipment. We conducted 
surveys of Departments and updated the Perpetual Inventory records. 

We estimated or secured estimates from moving concerns for various 
moves required by City Departments. We recommended procedure, confer and 
set the dates and supply necessary materials for moving or other liaison 
detai 1. 

We arrange the disposal by sale of various Waste materials: such 
as Waste Paper, Tab Cards (I.B.M.), X-Ray Film, and miscellaneous scrap 
metal. Surplus furniture and equipment is surveyed and made available to 
other City Departments by transfer. 

STORES DIVISION 

The past fiscal year has been a very trying year in the storerooms. 
Getting replacements for the storerooms has been quite a chore. 

Two Senior Storekeepers, Larry Evans with 17 years, Leonard Cordini 
with 13 years and Joe Frantz, Assistant Stores and Equipment Supervisor 
with 32 years have retired. One of our Senior Storekeepers relinquished 
his job and was reinstated in his old job as storekeeper. 

The test for Senior Storekeeper has been held and we are waiting for 
the list to be published so we can fill these vacancies. The test for the 
Assistant Stores and Equipment Supervisor will be held the early part of 
October. 

We have four new storerooms in various stages of completion. The 
San Francisco General Hospital should be completed the latter part of this 
year, the Airport the early part of 1976 and the two locations in the Rail- 
way we hope the latter part of 1976. 



- 13 - 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 



The Reproduction Bureau provides centralized service 
to all City Departments for photography, offset 
printing, mimeographing, blueprinting, microfilming 
and self service copiers. Funds to operate the Bureau 
are provided by Work Orders from the Departments. 

There were fewer increases in the price of supplies 
and contractual services within the past year. 

Our charges to Departments rose from $256,000 in 73- 
74 to $337,000 in 74-75. The great increase in charges 
over the previous year is largely due to work done by 
outside vendors, but channelled -through the Bureau. 

Unfortunately, no new equipment was received during the 
year. 

The cost of Itek platematerial to the Bureau has gone 
from $2800 in 1972 to $5000 in 1975. The increase 
reflects higher price and increased use. Even higher 
costs are anticipated, making a change to Electrostatic 
process much more important, because of the lower cost 
of electrostatic platematerial. The anticipated direct 
saving is close to $3000 a year. 

With the May 5, 197 5 meeting, we started printing the 
Board of Supervisors Calendar by the offset process, 
instead of mimeographing. That allows us to print on 
both sides of the sheet. There is a reduction of cost, 
it's faster, and the mailing costs drop significantly. 
A fifty percent increase in the price of paper in a 
year is another reason for reducing paper useage. 

We've experienced an increase in the length of reports 
and of the number of copies required. Printing many 
copies of a long report takes planning for the time and 
materials required. For the best service, we recommend 
that departments inform us of their requirements well in 
advance of their deadline. 



- 14 - 



BUREAU OF CENTRAL SHOPS 



Fire Apparatus Shops 
Electric Shop 
Pattern Shop 
Paint & Body Shop 
Metalsmith Shop 
Upholstery Shop 



Truck & Heavy Equipment Shop 

Quint St. Service Station 

19tb Avenue Station 

Quint St. Tire Shop 

Department of Electricity Garage 

Health Department Garage 



Recreation & Park Automotive Repair Shop 

Army St. (DPW) Station & Service Area 

Automobile & Light Truck Shop 

Hall of Justice Service Station 

Machine Shop 

Conclusion 

Fiscal Statement 

Fiscal Chart 

Department Expenditure Chart 

Automotive Inventory Chart 

Organization Chart 



- 15 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 



The Central Shops, and allied facilities, provide neces- 
sary mechanical maintenance and repair service for all City 
Departments and Bureaus, except Public Utilities. 

In addition, it is the responsibility of the Bureaus to 
inspect, appraise, and make recommendations on all City owned 
vehicles contemplated for replacement; aid the various depart- 
ments in the writing of .various specifications; and to receive 
and approve all new vehicles and automotive equipment delivered 
to the City and County of San Francisco. 

Administration and major repair facilities are located at 
the Central Shops, 800 Quint Street. 

Other Central Shops operations include Golden Gate Park 
Shop, providing maintenance for Recreation and Park Department 
equipment; Hall of Justice Service Station, v/here fuel and 
lubricants are provided for Police and other City cars, along 
with inspection and light maintenance for Police vehicles. De- 
partment of Public Works, Army Street Yard, where fuels, lubri- 
cants, preventive maintenance and inspection is provided Public 
Works vehicles. 19U> Avenue Public Works Station, Health Depart- 
ment Garage and Department of Electricity Garage. 

Administration of the Shops, under the Purchaser of Sup- 
plies, is the direct responsibility of Mr. Albert M. Flaherty, 
General Superintendent, aided by Mr. Edmond A. Rames, City 
Shops Assistant Superintendent. 

The Central Shops, Quint Street operation, has four main 
maintenance shop areas. They are 1) Automobile, 2) Truck, 
3) Fire Apparatus, 4) Machine; and the following auxiliary shops 
31acksmith, Pattern and Ladder Shop, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, 
Body and Fender, Tire, and Service Station. 

Along with the responsibilities for the maintenance and 
repair of mechanical equipment in school buildings, sewage 
plants, pumping stations, public buildings, etc., the Shops 
maintain 2926 units of the City owned automotive fleet. These 
vehicles and machines are valued at approximately 8.5 million 
dollars . 

The Bureau is staffed with 105 employees of which 2 are 
assigned from the Bureau of Stores and Equipment. (See orga- 
nization chart). 



FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 

The Fire Shop is staffed with nine Automotive Machinists, 
three Metalsmiths, three Painters, two Pattern Makers, one Body 
and Fender Man, one Upholsterer, and one Automotive Serviceman. 

Shop Supervision consists of one Foreman, Mr. A. Del Negro, 
and one Sub-Foreman, Mr. Ray Monti who oversee and control the 
maintenance and repair of fire apparatus and equipment used by 
our fire fighting forces. 

This unit processed a total of 2,471 jobs through the 
various sub shops for the year. 

One Automotive Machinist is assigned to our field service 
truck for minor repairs at fire stations. The field Service Man 
responded to 1,481 service calls in which repairs were made 
without neccessitating the apparatus being out of service. 

One Automotive Machinist is assigned to the San Francisco 
International Airport. He is responsible for the repairs and 
maintenance of all the apparatus and equipment used by our fire 
fighting forces at the Airport. 

Included in the total jobs completed for the Fire Department 
were: 

6 Complete engine overhauls 
117 Minor engine overhauls and/or repairs 
186 Fire pump repairs. Gauges, gates, change over 
valves, water leaks, etc. 

3 Major fire pump overhauls 

6 Standard transmission overhauls 

6 Automatic transmission overhauls 
13 Clutch replacements 

239 Brake repairs - reline - Air compressor- Air leaks 
Safety brakes. 

72 Complete engine tune ups 
106 Chassis repairs 

52 Aerial repairs 

7 Pieces of apparatus cannibalized for parts 
46 Radiator repairs 

9 500 gal. water tanks - sand blast - weld tank leaks 
and coat with rust resistant epoxy. 

Some major projects completed this year was the outfitting 
and placing in service of 3 Ward La France pumpers, 1 American 



- 17 - 



La France 100 ft aerial, 3 Crown Squrts, 1 Hydro Lift Boom Truck, 
1 Pick Up for the High Pressure System, 1 service truck for the 
Bureau of Equipment, convert three civilian defense auxiliary 
trucks, 2 to the High Pressure System Service and 1 to the 
Christmas toy detail. 

Added to the San Francisco Fire Department is a new 4/wheel 
drive cliff rescue truck. The booms, cliff . anchoring devices, 
cable rollers etc. were designed, manufactured and installed by 
this shop. 

ELECTRIC SHOP 

218 Electric repairs, consisting of alternators, generators, 
regulators, starters, and revolving lites. Also repairs and 
overhauls on small equipment such as chain saws, metal and cement 
cutting saws, electric power plants, high intensity flood lites, 
cords, battery chargers, small water pumps, water vaccum pumps, 
etc. 



PATTERN SHOP 

This Shop is staffed by 2 Pattern Makers. During the year 
they repaired, and rebuilt 56 various size and types of wooden 
ladders. Including crotch poles, pike poles and ceiling hooks. 
Pattern Makers repair, maintain and make new patterns as needed 
for the San Francisco Fire Department High Pressure System. They 
estimate costs and make pattern for various other departments 
such as valves and fittings for Park and Recreation pumps and 
related parts for the 3 Water Pollution Control Plants and Pumping 
Stations. They also manufacture various size blocks, wedges, 
pegs, small tool and equipment boxes, duck boards, cabinets, 
repair furniture and wood items as needed to equip ambulance and 
police cars. 

PAINT AND BODY SHOP 

Staffed by 3 Painters and 1 Body & Fender Man. The Body 
Shop repaired 96 accident damaged fire apparatus. 

Painters refinished all damaged areas including lettering 
and gold leaf along with items made in the Pattern Shop and 
Blacksmith Shop for D.P.W. and Police Department. Parts and 
assemblies from the main Fire Shop were painted. Included were 
3 aerial ladders, 171 repair and spot paint (accidents), stencil 
numbers en apparatus and equipment for re-assignment to other 
companies. 



18 - 



Painters install all City seals and Department numbers on 
all City owned vehicles, 

METALSMITH SHOP 

Make new metal compartments, partitions, boxes, aerial 
tiller cabs, construction of new running boards, doors, and 
chassis parts. Welding of brackets, tools, valves and fittings, 
pipe and flanges, machinery and machinery parts for other depart- 
ments o 

Included are the fabrication and installation of protective 
screens in police cars, repair of vehicle bodies, trailers, 
straighten bumpers, metal ladders, high pressure valves and wren- 
ches castings axe and maul handles, etc. 

UPHOLSTERY SHOP - 

All fabric and leather items are made up in this shop for 
the Fire Department such as belts, straps water proof covers, 
canvas bags, stretchers, etc. 

Re-upholster and make minor repairs for all shops. 

Fabricates leather items for all departments such as leather 
boxes for walkie-talkies for the Police Department. 

TRUCK AND HEAVY EQUIPMENT SHOP 

The Truck Shop is responsible for the maintenance and re- 
pairs of a wide variety of 644 trucks and complex motorized 
equipment operated by the various City Departments and Bureaus. 
A partial list intludes Mechanical Street Sweepers, Street Water 
Tankers, Mechanical Refuse Packers, Sewer Eductors, 10 Wheel 
Dump Trucks, Street Rollers, Backhoes, Street Paver, Street 
Scraper, Tractor's, Cranes, Forklifts, Vans, Passenger Buses, 
Concrete Saws, Ambulances, Compressors, Pumps, Lawn Mowers. 

The Truck Shop is staffed by 11 Automotive Machinist, 2 
Automotive Servicemen and 1 Metalsmith under the supervision of 
Foreman Arthur Chin. 1974 job orders were processed during the 
fiscal year. A partial listing of the work performed includes 

10 Complete engines rebuilt 

72 Minor engine repairs; valve grinds, head gaskets, etc, 
18 Complete transmission recuilted 
102 Minor transmission repairs 
42 Clutch replacements 



- 19 - 



124 Minor Clutch repairs 

107 Complete major engine tune ups 

49 Complete brake overhauls 

158 Minor Brake repairs 

13 Radiators recored 

89 Minor radiator repairs 

68 Carburetors rebuilted 

82 Minor fuel system repairs 

107 Alternators/generators rebuilt 

69 Minor charging system repairs 

96 Starters rebuilt 

48 Exhaust system repairs 

39 Steering, front end and spring repairs 

73 New battery replacements 

76 Road tow jobs 

152 Road service calls 

97 Blacksmith fabricating jobs 
16 Accident repairs 

25 Outfitting new vehicles and equipment for service, 

In addition the Truck Shop, through its foreman, is respon- 
sible for the operations of these four sub shops. 

Quint Street Service Station 

Gasoline Dispensed 179,180 gal. 

Oil Dispensed 14,352 qts. 

Vehicles lubed and serviced 1,422 

19tb Avenue Station 

Gasoline dispensed 72,063 gal. 

Oil dispensed 1,760 qts. 

Vehicles lubed and serviced 72 

Quint Street Tire Shop 

New Tires mounted 1,388 

Recap tires mounted 702 

Wheels switched 52 

Road calls 326 

Tires Repaired 639 

Department of Electricity Garage 

Oil dispensed 1,223 gal. 

Vehicles lubed and serviced 216 

Road calls 62 

Health Department Garage 

Lube & Service 226 

Tires 20 

Minor Repairs 56 



- 20 - 



RECREATION AND PARK AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP 

This Central Shop Branch facility, located at 3rd. Avenue 
and South Drive in Golden Gate Park, is staffed with five (5) 
Automotive Machinists, one (1) Automotive Serviceman and super- 
vised by Automotive Foreman, James Elliot. 

The fiscal year 1974-1975, saw 2,058 repair orders written 
and completed. An increase of 326 on the previous fiscal year. 

The addition of 172 units of equipment (47 autos and trucks 
plus 125 special motorized units) contributed to this increased 
workload. 

Included in the above jobs completed were the following 
major repairs. 



1 
2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 
14 
15 



Revamp six (6) new Toro Parkmaster mowers to meet the 
Parks specific needs. 

Complete body damage repairs and repaint on tree topper 
Hi Ranger aerial boom truck, including overhaul of the 
boom and bucket. 

Re-design and construct exhaust system on large "Wabco" 
Road Grader. 

Completely re-built brush chipper truck including engine, 
body repair, sandblasting and complete re-painting. 

Major re-build to power tractor rotary mower. 

Major overhaul on Caterpillar tractor undercarriage due 
to rust and corrosion. 

Major overhaul on "Case" bucket loader hydraulic system. 

Major overhaul on "Rogers" sweeper drive train. 

Major engine re-build on 1970 International dump truck. 

Re-built 1971 Chevrolet Van body due to extensive rust 
and corrosion. 

Re-design and construct tail gate ramps on two (2) six 
man crew, service trucks. 

Major body re-build and complete re-paint on 1967 Ford 
Pick Up due to rust and corrosion. 

Fabricate safety steps for refuse packer truck. 

Overhaul cat-tructor steering and clutch linkage system. 

Design and fabricate safety door stops on seven (7) 
"Parkmaster" tow mowers. 



Recent additions to the park equipment fleet brings their 
present equipment inventory at 640 units. Consisting of 191 



- 21 - 



motor vehicles and trucks with 449 units of park and farm type 
specialty equipment. 

Increased number of units plus increasing demand for repairs 

to progressively aging units places a heavy burden on this branch 

of the Central Shops in order to meet increased labor and mate- 
rial costs within the limited budgetary allocation. 

The Park Shop unit dispensed 134,942 gallons of gasoline, 
9,055 gallons of diesel fuel and 1,365 gallons of motor oil 
during the 1974-1975 fiscal year. 

ARMY STREET (DPW) STATION 

This service facility is located in D.P.W. maintenance 
yard at 2323 Army Street. 

Its function is to provide minor maintenance and repairs, 
preventive maintenance and fuels and lubricants to the fleet of 
the Department of Public Works automotive equipment. Services 
are available from 7:00 A.M. to midnight, five (5) days per week. 

The station is staffed with one Automotive Machinist, four 
Automotive Servicemen and one Sub-Foreman, Mr. Elmer Bryden. 

The fiscal year saw 2,002 various repair and service jobs 
completed. 325,785 gallons of gasoline were dispensed along with 
703 gallons of kerosene, 2,653 gallons of lube oil and 3,239 
gallons diesel fuel. 

68 various units of automotive equipment were routed to the 
Central Shops for correction of major defects. 

A parking bay, adjacent to the service station, was devel- 
oped into a service and inspection area for motorized street 
sweepers. This plained service is to work in conjunction with 
the Street Cleaning Bureau's expanded program of mechanical 
sweeping of controlled parking streets throughout the City. 



- 00 - 



AUTOMOBILE AND LIGHT TRUCK SHOP 



The Automobile Shop is staffed with eight Automotive Mecha- 
nics, two Automotive Servicemen, and one Automotive Machinist 
Foreman, Mr. Ed Franke. 

The Automotive Shop is responsible for the maintenance and 
repair of 1,414 vehicles, which include both passenger and light 
trucks to 3/4 ton capacity. 

This year the Automotive Shop has the additional task of 
maintaining 5 7 Cushman Three Wheel Vehicles purchased for Parking 
Meter Patrol. 

Other eguipment maintained by the Automotive Shop are 19 
Honda 125 c.c. trail bikes for park and beach patrol. 40 Vespa 
Two Wheel Scooters for police patrolling, and Harley Davidson 
Three Wheel Bikes. 

Major projects accomplished were special outfitting of eight 
Fire Department Vehicles, 80 Police Vehicles, 4 Sheriff Station 
Wagons, and 97 vehicles for various other departments. 25 Police 
and 4 Sheriff vehicles were equipped with new roof light bar 
to hold revolving red roof lights and amber roof lights for 
emergency service, specially manufactured security partitions, 
hidden rear door locks, and roof numbers. 4 Vans were modified 
as Police Patrol Vans. 

A listing of completed work includes 1,003 brake jobs and 
inspection of drums and all hydraulic parts. 660 engine tune-ups 
were completed and tested with our Sun Electronic Engine Tester 
and Marquette Infrared Emissions analyzer. 143 automatic 
transmissions were completely rebuilt and adjusted to factory 
specifications. 74 transmissions were adjusted and serviced. 
10 engines were completely overhauled ana 19 received valve 
grinds. 140 vehicles had radiators rebuilt and cooling systems 
checked for proper cooling. 294 road service calls were made 
which included on the spot repairs or towing to the City Shop 
for major repair. 58 standard transmission clutch jobs were 
completed. Miscellaneous jobs numbered 726 bringing the total 
to 3,428 jobs completed. 

In addition to the normal flow of shop work, considerable 
time (4 to 8 hrs per vehicle) was required for welding and rein- 
forcing the frames on 66 Plymouth Patrol Vehicles. 



H-^LL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION 

This branch of the Central Shops is located on Bryant St., 
west of the Hall of Justice. It provides fuel and service to 
Police Department vehicles and supplies gasoline and oil to 
other City vehicles. The station is operated 7 days a week from 
7 A.M. to midnight and is staffed with nine Automotive Service- 
men, two Automotive Mechanics and one Automotive Mechanic Sub- 
Foreman. 

The convenient down-town location and the accelerated useage 
of Police vehicles make this a high volume distribution point of 
fuel and lubricants for City vehicles. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 

Gasoline Dispensed 

Police Department 569,685 gallons 

Other Departments 156,615 gallons 



Total 726,300 gallons 



Oil Dispensed 



Police Department 15,990 Quarts 

Other Departments 898 uuarts 

Total 16,888 uuarts 

Tow Jobs (Autos) 918 

Tires changed (new) 1,511 

Battery Service (New & charged) 220 

Lube and Service jobs 2,150 

Mechanical repairs 8,664 

Brake reline jobs 704 

Motorcycle Service 

Lube & Service 592 

Tire changes 390 

Batteries 164 

Repairs 4,003 

Tows 190 

The motorcycle preventive maintenance and service program 
was improved upon at this station, with the assignment of an 
Automotive Mechanic to perform scheduled services and make emer- 
gency repairs on the growing fleet of various Police Motorcycles. 



- 24 - 



Located adjacent to the Hall of Justice Garage, where 
Police motorcycles are stored, we are able to give prompt ser- 
vice with minimum loss of Police officers time from his beat. 
This program, in the planning stage for several years, has been 
welcomed by the Police Traffic Bureau as a major, improvement 
in the automotive service we provide that department. 4003 
repairs were made on the fleet of 303 Police motorcycles an 
increase of 2366 jobs over the previous year when the bulk of 
that work was performed on contract. 

MACHINE SHOP 

The compliment of the Machine Shop consist of 9 Mainte- 
nance Machinist and 1 Maintenance Machinist Foreman Mr. John 
J. Raos. During the Fiscal year 1974-75 this Shop serviced a 
total of 890 jobs. 

The areas in which this shop services are in the Public 
Schools, boiler rooms, reconditing and repairing blower fans, 
circulating pumps, and heat pump. 

The Machine Shop services and maintains all Machine Shop 
tools and hand tools of the Industrial Arts, section of the 
School Department. The complete over— hauling of metal lathes, 
Print Shop equipment, sheet metal and wood working tools. 

The Machine Shop section services and repair all boiler 
room equipment required to heat and ventilate all the buildings 
of the Community College. The installation of new sewerage 
pumps for the creative Arts Building at the Community College. 

The Park and Recreation Department requires our services 
in the repair and over hauling of numerous sewerage and irri- 
gation pumps located thru-out the Park System. 

The Ferry Fountain pumps located at the timbarcadero Center 
were recently reconditioned and over— hauled by this section of 
Central Shops. 

The Machine Shop of Central Shops in conjunction with the 
Building Repair Department of the Public Works Department re- 
pairs and services all Fire Station doors. The repair of all 
heat pumps, fans, and circulating pumps in all the Health Cen- 
ters thru out the City. The re-design and installation of new 
check valves for the pump room located at the Geary St. under 
pass. 

The Sewer Treatment Plants consisting of the South-East 
North Point, Richmond, and Sunset plants, are kept in repair 
by 4 machinist under the supervision of the Machine Shop Foreman, 



- 25 - 



The Maintenance Machinist in these plants maintain and 
repair machinery necessary to carry out a 24 hour operation of 
these plants. 

The men assigned to these plants repair, re-build parts 
for various pump filter driers, gas blowers, and other related 
machinery necessary to the operation of these plants. They 
further repair and completely over haul the mainlift pumps, 
which there are 4. Recently one of the large lift pumps was 
over-hauled and reconditioned at the South East treatment plant 
by the Maintenance assigned to this plant. 

The high pressure water system in providing water neces- 
sary to fight large fires in the City, requires the services 
of the Machine Shop in keeping in good order the machinery, 
pumps and fire hydrants to carry out this function. 

The Machine Shop was assigned to service and overhaul all 
the large check valves at the #1 Fire Pump Station at 2nd. at 
Townsend Street. 

The Hose Shop is a sub-section of the Machine Shop. This 
unit is charged with the inspection, repair and distribution 
of all Fire Hose. 

During the past fiscal year 1974-1975 48,000 feet of new 
hose was inspected, tested, labelled and distributed to the 
various Fire Department companies. 

Over 15,000 feet of inservice fire hose was inspected, 
repaired and sent back to the Fire companies. 



- 26 - 



CONCLUSION 



The fiscal year 1974-75 saw an increase in activity by 
the Central Shops, with a total of 10,821 job orders written 
and completed. Additional 17,995 minor repair, preventive 
maintenance and inspections, tire repairs and changes, battery 
services and tow jobs were completed. 

As it has been in past years, we again find that the re- 
lationship between shop manpower and equipment maintained is 
being further extended. Since the last major management study 
of the Central Shops by the John F. Forbes Company, in 1959, 
when 94 employees maintained 1,573 units of equipment, we now 
maintain with 103 employees 2,938 units. A 10% increase of 
employment against a 86% increase in automotive units maintained, 
This ratio makes it increasingly difficult for the Shops to 
perform our responsibilities in the manner that we would desire. 

Further we have experienced, an inordinate vacancy factor 
within our staff due to retirements and promotions that left 
us with eight employees short of our normal compliment for the 
greater part of the fiscal year. This situation is aggravated 
by the present City fiscal policy of "freezing" replacement re- 
quisitions. The net result is necessary maintenance being de- 
ferred and capital equipment deteriorating with the lack of 
timely repairs. 

It is hoped that the budget authorities will eventually 
agree on the need for a reasonable replacement program for City 
vehicles. Our present policy does not provide for this, with 
few exceptions, vehicles are maintained in service far beyond 
their economical life expectancy. 

Due to the increasing cost of automobiles, a tendency has 
developed to further minimize replacements and when replacements 
are approved to provide sufficient funds to purchase sub-compact 
cars • 

While it is true that these small vehicles are less costly 
to purchase and will consume somewhat less fuel, they will not 
provide us with the longevity of service we have enjoyed in the 
past. 

The fuel shortage th_t plagued us the previous fiscal year 
did not continue into the 1974-75 year. Though gasoline was 
readily available in the market the cost increased continually 
through out the year. Poster prices on July 1, 1975 for low 
lead gasoline ranged from ,3902c per gallon for 5000 gallon or 
more deliveries to .454c for under 5000 gallon deliveries. 



27 - 



Unfortunally our storage capacity in many locations is insuf- 
ficient to permit us to take advantage of the lower bulk rates. 
Early consideration must be given to increasing this capacity 
as an economy measure and as a safety factor that would permit 
us sufficient reserves over the ten day capacity we now have. 

With the cooperation of the Electronic Data Processing 
Division of the Controllers office an improved system of recor- 
ding fuel consumption, cost of fuel and vehicle mileage has 
been developed. E.D.P. runs will soon be available that will 
provide the City more precise control and greater economy in 
the operation of the automotive fleet. 



- 28 - 



CENTRAL SHOPS 

Annual Report 
1974-1975 
Comparison of Expenditures with Amount Budgeted 

BUDGETED EXPENDED 

SUMMARY 1974-75 1974-75 

Permanent Salaries $ 100,620.00 $ 92,163.00 

Overtime 1,710.00 1,449.00 

Holiday Pay 705.00 384.00 

Wages 1,401,113.00 1,774,571.00 

Contractual Services 187,136.00 137,247.00 

Materials and Supplies 337,800.00 470,360.00 

Fixed Charges 56.00 56.00 

Mandatory Fringe Benefits 307,599.00 307,599.00 

SUB-TOTAL $ 2,336,739.00 $ 2,783,829.00 

Add: Supplemental $ 193,732.00 

Less: Special Work Orders 
which are not part 
of budgeted amounts $( 253,358.00) 

S 2,530,471.00 $ 2,530,471.00 



JCS/mh 



29 - 



HOW CENTRAL SHOPS SPENT FUNDED DOLLARS 
DURING THE YEAR 19 74-75 




GRAND TOTAL OPERATING COSTS $2,530,471.00 






30 - 



CENTRAL SHOPS 

ANNUAL REPORT - SCHEDULE No.l 
1974-75 
DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES 



DEPARTMENT 

Adult Probation 

Art Commission 

Assessor 

City Attorney 

City Planning 

Civil Service 

Controller 

Emergency Services 

District Attorney 

Fire Department 

Equipment in Houses 

High Pressure 

Mayor 

Model Cities 

Police 

Motorcycles 

Public Defender 

Social Services 

Single Men's Rehab. 

Sheriff 

Supervisors 

Probation Office 

Log Cabin 

Hidden Valley 

Academy of Science 

Chief Admin. Officer 

Coroner 

Electricity 

Public Administrator 

Real Estate 

Registrar 

Tax Collector 

'Weights and Measures 

Purchasing 

D.P.W. 



Architecture 
Building Inspection 
Building Repair 
Traffic Painting 
Engineering 
General Office 
Personnel Administration 
Sewage Pumping 
Sewage Treatment 
oewer Repair 
Street Cleaning 
Broom Cores 



AMOUNT 




APPROPRIATED 


EXPENDED 


2,205.00 


$ 2,195.84 


300.00 


297.14 


992.00 


712.12 


350.00 


389.57 


1,625.00 


1,672.87 


250.00 


207.33 


700.00 


348.26 


2,410.00 


2,390.16 


1,700.00 


1,220.87 


406,931.00 


426,414.60 


159,396.00 


170,583.57 


19,202.00 


19,535.68 


2,217.00 


4,944.73 


5,616.00 


5,028.27 


396,082.00 


413,254.55 


86,500.00 


70,813.26 


1,045.00 


1,021.24 


11,503.00 


11,773.83 


333.00 


754.07 


20,465.00 


20,702.43 


1,175.00 


1,104.59 


7,497.35 


7,692.03 


4,200.00 


4,356.60 


800.00 


722.83 


800.00 


952.39 


630.00 


1,632.51 


2,280.03 


2,303.90 


15,446.00 


15,319.43 


1,432.00 


1,664.91 


300.00 


337.05 


375.00 


103.20 


2,200.00 


2,359.00 


3,750.00 


3,834.54 


700.00 


735.90 


2,650.00 


2,526.70 


15,245.00 


15,343.61 


31,729.00 


30,966.28 


8,200.00 


7,795.09 


11,335.00 


11,770.00 


627.00 


1,103.24 


1,200.00 


1,056.17 


1,984.00 


1,908.13 


7,062.00 


7,302.97 


65,618.00 


66,169.33 


133,165.00 


134,113.35 


10,400.00 


7,268.54 



- 31 - 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DEPARTMENT 

Garagernan 
Auto Mechanic 

PUBLIC HEALTH 

Administration 
Food and Sanitation 
Health Centers 
Public Nurse 
Emergency Hospital 
Hassler Home 
Laguna Honda 
General Hospital 
Mental Health 
Bureau of Alcoholism 

De Young Museum 
Library 

Recreation & Park 
Recreation & Park - Gen, 
Candlestick Park 
School District 
City College 
Street Repair 
Army Street 
Traffic Engineering 
Street Planting 
Airport 



AMOUNT 
APPROPRIATED 

17,624.00 
24,285.00 



2,250.00 

11,452.00 

1,480.00 

22,795.89 

700.00 

4,274.00 

3,975.00 

2,550.00 

300.00 

1,013.00 

2,600.00 

210,148.00 

8,000.00 

3,000.00 

14,050.00 

11,000.00 

125,458.00 

34,180.00 

12,950.00 

10,480.00 

9,700.40 



EXPENDED 

16,970.66 
24,272.34 



2,719.64 
8,335.55 
1,174.27 

19.80 

43,073.04 

723.91 

4,377.21 

3,883.83 

2,414.94 

85.04 

877.34 

2,169.20 

210,921.21 

6,9 70.84 

3,543.30 

12,520.74 

11,062.34 

124,917.12 

34,078.14 

20.771.59 

14,800.77 

9,636.88 



TOTAL 
DEFICIT 



$ 1,984,887.67 $2,045,022.38 

60.134.71 

$ 2.045.022.38 $2.045.022.38 



Add: Funds expended for 

special work which are not 
budgeted $ 

Quarterly Work Orders from 
various departments for 
various jobs, other than re- 
gular. Auto repair $ 



253,358.00 $ 253,358.00 



232.090.62 $ 232.090.62 
$ 2.530,471.00 $2.530.471.00 



JCS/mh 



UNITS OF CITY-OWNED VEHICLES 3Y DEPARTMENT 
PER IBM INVENTORY RUN AS OF JUNE 30, 1975 



DEPT. 
NO. 



DEPARTMENT 



NO. OF 
VEHICLES 



DEPT. 
NO. 



DEPARTMENT 



NO. OF 
VEHICLES 



111 
113 
115 
117 
119 
121 
123 
131 
141 
145 
151 
154 
161 
165 
169 
170 
173 
181 
185 
187 
188 
213 
221 
223 
233 
243 
245 
247 
255 
261 
265 
311 
312 



413 

415 

415. 

417 

417. 

421 

423 

424 

425 

427 

429 

431 



ADULT PROBATION 

ART COMMISSION 

ASSESSOR 

CITY ATTORNEY 

CITY PLANNING 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

CONTROLLER 

S.F. DISASTER CORPS. 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

MAYOR 

MODEL CITIES PROG. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

SOCIAL SERVICES 

SINGLE MEN'S REHAB. 

SHERIFF 

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

JUVENILE COURT 

J. CLOG CABIN 

HIDDEN VALLEY SCHOOL 

CA. ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 

CHIEF ADMN. OFFICER 

CORONER 

DEPT. OF ELECTRICITY 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR 

REAL ESTATE 

CIVIC AUDITORUM 

REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 

TAX COLLECTOR 

WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

PURCHASING-MaIN OFFICE 



8 

3 
2 
3 
2 

1 
2 
5 
7 
281 
8 

12 

383 

4 

41 
2 

52 
2 

21 
6 



1 
7 

45 
3 
1 
3 
1 
7 

10 
5 



PURCHASING-CENTRAL SHOP 39 



DEPT. OF PU3LIC WORKS 

ARCHITECTURE 
BLDG. INSPECTION 
F.A.C.E. PROGRAM 
BLDG. REPAIR 
! TRAFFIC PAINTING 
ENGINEERING 
GENERAL OFFICE 
PERSONNEL ADM. 
SEWAGE PUMPING 
SEWAGE TREATMENT 
SEWER REPAIR 
STREET CLEANING 



PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT 
513 ADMINISTRATION 
525.1 COMM. DISEASE 
531 FOOD & SANITaRY INSP. 



9 

45 

5 

121 

27 

41 

2 

3 

2 

29 

107 

127 



7 

1 

32 



535 HEALTH CENTERS 9 

539 PUB. HEALTH NURSING 1 

551 EMERGENCY HOSPITaLS 16 

553 HASSLER HOSPITAL 8 

555 LAGUNA HONDA HOSP. 12 

557 S.F. GEN. HOSPITAL 10 

561 MENTAL ADMIN. 2 

567 MENTAL HEALTH 10 

5 77 BUR. OF ALCOHOLISM 3 



621 DE YuJNG MUSEUM 3 

631 PUBLIC LIBRARY 8 

651 REC.& PARK-GENERaL 191 

651-S REC.& PARK-NON-aUTO 449 

653 CANDLESTICK PARK 7 



S.F. UNIFIED SCHOOL DIST. 

661-B JOHN O'CONNELL 
661-E SHOP TRUCKS 
661-F GARDNERS AUTOS, ETC. 
661-G DELIVERY TRUCKS 
661-H ADMINISTRATION 
661-J DELIVERY, FURNITURE 
669 CITY COLLEGE 

7 75 S.F. PORT COMMISSION 

DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 



4 
17 
27 
14 
9 
8 
38 

70 



681 DPW-STREET REPAIR 102 
683 BUREAU OF ENGINEERING 36 

686 DPW-TREE PLANTING 46 

SUB-TOTAL 2,635 

161-M POLICE SOLOS 91 

161-M POLICE 3 WHEELS 149 

161-S POLICE SCOOTERS 39 

161-T POLICE TRAIL BIKcS 24 



grand Total 



2,938 



- 33 



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TABLE NO . 1 
Purchase Orders Processed 

1973-74 1975-7^ 

Purchase Purchase 

Orders Amount Orders Amount 

General 14453 8 15,846,231 13431 $ 14,069,190 

Education 9663 7,075,882 9018 6,029,496 

Health 5631 5,270,191 5537 6,347,948 

Utilities 5934 6,941,909 5983 6,545,860 

35681 $ 33,134,213 32969 $ 32,992,494 



1975-74 1974-7§ 
Purchase by 
Encumbrance Request 3 53,824,210 $ 74,841,892 



Purchase thru 

Contract Certification 2,518,652 3,000,000 



Grand Total 77,841,892 



TABLE NO 2 
Expenditures 



Comparisons of expenditures with original budget for all appro- 
priations except Personal Service for 1974—75: 



Account 

Contract Services 
4.311.200.000 



Budgeted and 
Supplemented 



68646 



Materials &. Supplies 
4.311.300.000 14-550 



Equipment 
4.311.400.000 



752 



Premium Official Bonds 

4. 311. 812. 000 8398 

Premium Auto Insurance 

4. 311. 81 3. 000 63007 

Misc. Insurance 
4.311.815.000 44415 

Membership 

4-. 311. 854-. 000 987 



Encumbered 

& Expended Surplus Deficit 



69595 

13262 

683 

8398 
63670 
38181 

1043 



1288 



69 



6234 



949 



663 



56 



Total 



200755 



194832 



7591 1668 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

ANNUAL REPORT 



Fiscal Year 1975-76 









September, 1976 



ANNUAL REPORT 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and con- 
tractual services for all departments of the City and County, including 
City-owned utilities, the San Francisco Port Commission, and the San Fran- 
cisco Community College; repairs and maintains automotive and other equip- 
ment for the various departments, except Public Utilities, and for the 
School District as requested; operates a central reproduction bureau for 
departments requiring its services; transfers to other departments for use 
or sells equipment and supplies no longer useful to any department of the 
City; maintains a perpetual inventory of equipment in the various depart- 
ments ; and operates central stores of the Purchasing and various other de- 
partments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the 
shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying 
on new products, specifications and prices. 

The Purchasing Department during the fiscal year 1975-1976, expend- 
ed $29,202,103.99, through Purchase Orders, $67,649,000.00 Encumbrance 
Requests and approximately $12,076,484.00 through Certification of Con- 
tract for a total of approximately $108,927,587.99. Sales of Charters, 
Codes and other documents amounted to $11,435.61. 

Charges by the Reproduction Bureau for printing, mimeographing, blue- 
printing, etc. amounted to $212,000.00. Consideration should be given to 
the bureaus request for replacement of obsolete and inefficient equipment 
so they can reduce the cost to the departments and assume a greater part 
of the printing work load that is being sent to outside vendors. 

The Bureau of Central Shops furnished maintenance, repair and service 
for 2,939 motorized units of the City-owned fleet. The total fleet is val- 
ued at approximately 10.5 million dollars. 

The number of gallons of gasoline dispensed decreased over the previous 
year c rom 1,438,270 to 1,118,166 gallons. 

The Bureau of Central Shops is encountering a problem in maintaining 
repair and service because of the increase in the average age of the ve- 
hicles in the City fleet. As the vehicles become older, they need more 
and more repair each year. 

The Bureau of Stores and Equipment staffs the City's major storerooms, 
maintains inventory control of City-owned equipment and is responsible for 
the sale of surplus City equipment and supplies. Sales of these items a- 
mounted to $113,216.29 during the past fiscal year. The bureau has oper- 
ated since January 1976 without a Bureau Head due to cuts in funding. This 
has caused serious supervisorial problems for the bureau. 



PERSONNEL 

Authorized pos itions totaled 198 permanent in four bureaus. The Organiza- 
tion chart is shown in the Appendix. 

SUPERVISORY - June 30, 1976 



Administrative 



J.C. Gavin - Purchaser of Supplies 
Helen E. Mc Manis - Secretary 
Janice L. Stovall - Sr. Clerk Typist 



BUREAUS 



Buying 

R. Tecco - Asst. Director of Purchasing & Services - Bureau Head. 

R.C. Erickson - Senior Purchaser (Buying Staff) 

G.A. Clarke - Senior Purchaser (S.F. General Hospital) 

G.F. Burket - Senior Purchaser (Specifications & Standardization) 

James Breslin, Senior Purchaser (Municipal Railway) 

Judith M. Matranga - Coding Supervisor (acting) 

Equipment and Supplies 

Harold Gheno - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

Personnel and Accounts 

Anna Gibbons - Clue f Clerk - Bureau Head 
Glenda Condran - Senior Accountant 

Reproduction 

Edward Fundis - Reproduction Manager - Bureau Head 

Shops 

A.M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops - Bureau Head 
E.R. Karnes - Assitant Superintendent of City Shops 



SEPARATIONS : 



RETIRED 

NAME 


POSITION 


APPROX. YEARS 

OF 
CITY SERVICE 


Bryden, Elmer A. 


Auto Machinist Sub. Foreman 27 


10-15-75 


Kramer, Rudolph J. 


Auto Machinist 


29 


11-8-75 


Delnegro, Anthony D. 


Auto Machinist Foreman 


28 


12-6-75 


Farren, Frank 


Senior Storekeeper 


24 


1-1-76 


Rossit, Walter 


Senior Storekeeper 


20 


1-1-76 


Wilberg, Ernest C. 


Automotive Serviceman 


29 


2-7-76 


Commins, Frances D. 


Senior Clerk Typist 


8 


3-1-76 


Beck, Joseph H. 


Stores & Equipment Supr. 


33 


2-18-76 


Sanchez, Salvatore C. 


Storekeeper 


15 


4-1-76 


Munoz, Joseph C. 


Automotive Mechanic 


14 


4-1-76 


Johnson, Clarence L. 


Upholsterer 


24 


4-1-76 


Lee, James H. 


Metal Smith 


10 


6-1-76 


Passama, Frank J. 


Automotive Serviceman 


22 


6-30-76 


DIED 




« 




Kelley, Ward W. 


Purchaser 

WORK ACCOMPLISHED 


Ik 


5-30-76 



The work accomplished in the fiscal year is described in more detail 
unde^ the separate bureaus. 



Recapitulation is as follows: 



Bureau 



Unit 



1974-75 



1975-76 



Buying 



Purchase Orders 
Amount 



32,969 



31,039 



$32,992,494.00 $29,202,103.99 



Encumbrance Req. 
Amount 



$74,841,892.00 $67,649,000.00 



Personal & Professional 

Service Contracts 

Amount $3,000,000.00* $12,076,484.00 



*Estimate only 



Bureau Unit 1974-75 1975-76 

Bids Processed 

Price quotations 6,055 

Informal Bids 2,526 

Formal Bids 318 

Term Contracts 105 

Stores and Surplus Sales 

Equipment Amount $241,255.00 $113,216.29 

Major Stores Operated 11 11 

Shops Job Orders 10,821 9,384 

Expenditures $2,530,471.00 $2,430,951.00 

Gasoline Dispensed (gal.) 1,438,270.00 1,118,166 (gal.) 

Reproduction Services rendered 

Amount $337,495.00 $212,000.00 

PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICE CONTRACTS 

Section 7.100 of the Charter specifies that the Purchaser of Supplies 
shall enter into agreements for all contractual services required by the 
several departments and offices of the City and County. 

In conformance with the Charter Section, the Purchasing Department is 
now involved yearly with a multitude of contracts for personal and profes- 
sional service to the total value of approximately $12,076,484.00. Much of 
this 12 million is derived from Federal and State grants. 

This rapid expansion over the past four years has overwhelmed our 
small staff which furthermore has been depleted by job freezes and budget 
personnel reductions. 

The work involved in this area consists of the review of each contract 
to establish its conformance with our requirements such as inclusion of all 
standard contractual conditions, insurance coverage bonding if necessary, 
proper signatures and supporting documents. 

In addition to the contracts themselves, we are required to review 
and appove if acceptable all the financial documents involved such as 
contract certifications, contract modifications, contract payment authori- 
zations, certificates of acceptance, encumbrance requests etc. 

In an attempt to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of this area 
of procurement, the Purchaser is currently meeting from time to time with 
personnel from the Controller's office. We are examining and evaluating 
our present procedures and attempting to create better control and a higher 
degree of validation. 

At a later date, we plan to meet with representatives of other City 
and County Departments with the goal of incorporating any benificial ideas 
they may offer, and the elimination of as much red tape as possible. 



BUREAU OP PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS 



Anna Gibbons - Chief Clerk 
Bill Pite - Principal Clerk 



Traveling 
Requisitions: 



Purchase 
Orders: 



Monthly Repetitive Purchase Orders are processed 
in quantity on a repeat basis. These are large 
numbers of requisitions as used by Public Health, 
Public Utilities, Public Works, Purchasing, 
Recreation and Park, Schools, Sheriff, Library, 
Controller, S.P. Community College, Airport and 
Port Commission. 



Purchase orders are prepared by a Xerox process 
directly from the Requisition, thus assuring 
accuracy and speed of processing. 



Tabulation 
of Bids: 



Requisition 
Register: 



Vendor Index: 



Coder on 
Purchase 
Orders: 



Bid Index: 



A microfilmed record of all bids receive by 
Purchasing. 



Cumulative runs of this register are made 
daily, weekly and monthly and are indispensable 
in locating requisitions processed for purchase 
order. 

An alphabetical listing of purchase orders by 
Vendor kept on a continual basis. 



Use of Vendor Location Code, Buyer Code and 
Commodity Code continual. 

An informational source document showing all 
bid items on a commodity basis. 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS (Continued) 



The number of purchase orders to be prepared is not constant, 
chiefly due to the fact that requisitions do not flow into the 
department in a uniform manner. Consequently, there are times 
when a high production may be desired when personnel is depleted 
by vacations (which cannot be spread over the normal vacation 
period due to conditions beyond our control), sickness, or other- 
wise. Our very limited temporary funds must be used in even more 
critical areas and at more critical times. 

Sale of Charters, Codes and other documents: 



197^-75 
$16,610.00 
Discount earned amounted to: 

197^-75 
$107,888.76 



1975-76 
$11,435.61 

1975-76 
$86,716.81 



The Accounting Section is responsible for the department 
budget; encumbrance requests for contractual services for 
general office and reproduction; quarterly sales tax return; 
monthly fuel use tax returns; monthly gas and oil distribution 
reports; processing of inter-departmental work orders; security 
of counter sales funds; departmental revolving fund purchases; 
departmental pay check distribution; and regular accounting 
duties. 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

The Bureau of Buying, under the supervision of the Assistant Director 
of Purchasing and Services, is responsible for the procurement of supplies, 
equipment, services and insurance for all City and County departments and 
the San Francisco Community College District. As requisitions are received 
from the various City and County Agencies they are converted either dir- 
ectly to purchase orders, as in the case of term contract items or to formal 
or informal bids by the appropriate buyer according to commodity code. Gen- 
erally, the procurement functions (outlined in detail in a previous report) 
are as follows : 

I BUYING - BIDS AND AWARDS 

Evaluation by requisition document to determine type of procurement 
action to be taken ; preparation of bids to include contractual and tech- 
nical requirements; analysis and award of bids. 

II BUYING - RELATED FUNCTIONS 

Analysis of records of previous purchases specifically related to 
factors of average use; maintenance of individual specification files and 
library of pertinent catalogs and technical data; research on new items; 
preparation of new and review and/or revision of old term contracts; and 
procedural review. 

III INSURANCE 



Pursuant to Charter Section 7.100 and Sections 21.2-1 and 21.4 of the Adminis- 
trative Code, the Purchaser of Supplies contracts for the insurance coverage 
for all the various City and County departments, boards and commissions. 

This insurance program has greatly increased in size and complexity over the 
past years due to the expansion and extension of public facilities and services. 
In addition, there has been a deterioration of insurance markets and sharp 
increases in premium costs, some of which has been brought about by the legis- 
lative and judicial action in the field of general tort liability. 

The effect on the Purchasing Department has been to greatly increase the workload 
of oui small buying staff, which has never had available to it in its work force 
the trained and experienced insurance specialist needed for this highly technical 
procurement. 

We strongly recommend the creation of a separate Risk Management Bureau, adequately 
staffed with trained and experience personnel. We believe the benefits and savings 
accruing from such an organization would be highly advantageous. 



BUYING PERSONNEL 
The buying staff consists of the following personnel; 

1 - Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 
3 - Senior Purchasers 

6 - Purchasers 

2 - Purchasers (Printing) 



OPERATIONS 



1. Purchasing workload is assigned to the individual buyer on a commodity 
basis with allowance for items of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks 
or vacations make it advisable to deviate from this policy. Budget equipment 

(OH 400 funds) is also spread throughout the buying staff to prevent an overload 
on any particular buyer. 

2. Periodic meetings of the buying staff are held to permit the exchange 

of ideas; the formulation of improved operating procedures; discussions of mutual 
problems; review and refinement of existing procedures; and in general to keep 
the staff apprised of the Lity-wide purchasing picture. 

3. In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish infor- 
mation that will indicate a standard of overall quality and usefullness suitable 
for actual use requirements, and to permit competitive bidding as required by the 
Charter and Administrative Code. The new form devised for this purpose makes it 
easier for departments to furnish desired information for bid purposes. 

4. As time is available, personnel are assigned to: 

a. Review specifications, forms, and procedures. 

b. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services where 
desirable. Term contracts added during the past fiscal year, 
are as follows : 

(1) Concrete Pumping Service 85850 

(2) Diesel Engine Injections 71650 

(3) Flocculant, liquid carbonic, water treatment 66325 

(4) Printing, Car Cards (Muni Man of the Month) 95500 

(5) Radio Installation and Maintenance Service 7705U 



5. Whenever practical term contracts are entered into for various services 
and commodities in general use by several departments or recurringly used 
by a department. The main advantages are elimination of the time lag result- 
ing when individual bids are requested and elimination of the cost involved 
in individual bids. Term contracts must be periodically revised and specifi- 
cations updated. New items are added as required, 



6. Major purchases included the following! 



Prop.# 



Description & Department 



Amount 



874 Drive, Fan Belt, Viscous - Railway 

877 Security Guard Service for The Bayview/Huntera Pt. - Mayor 

881 Valve, Butterfly, 60" - Water - Engineering 

901 Valve, Ball - Water 

941 Trucks - Water 

949 Furnish & Install Duplex Intercom System - Health S.F.G^H. 

970 Cleaning Service at Candlestick Park - Rec/Park 

987 Meter, Water Flow Rate Indicating - Water 

994 CCTV System - Electricity 

997 Chain, Links & Pins - Public Works 

998 Transmission, Bus - Railway 

103 Furnish & Install Radio, Mobile - Airport Commission 

118 Freezers & Refrigerators - School 

119 Shelving, Racks & Benches - Airport Commission 

131 X-Ray Film & Report Filing Storage System, Medical - S.F.G, 

145 Transceiver, Radio - Airport Commission 

146 Trucks - Various 

147 Sweeper, Street - Rec/Park 

178 Refrigeration Machines & Related Services - Airport 

187 Uniforms for Employees - Sheriff 

203 Material, Plastic Fabricated - S.F.P.C. 

208 Pamphlet, Printed, Election - Registrar 

211 Fire Truck - Fire 

214 Forms, Printed, Election - Registrar 

219 Election Supplies - Finance & Records 

224 Booklet, Printed City College, 1976-77 Catalog - College 

229 Valve, Gate - Water, Engineering 

231 Chain - Public Works 

260 Automobiles - Police 

293 Coffee - Health 

281 Sprockets & Chain - Public Works 

242 Medical Gas Equipment & Controls - Health 

282 Ventilator & Respirator - Health 

326 Polyvinyl Chloride Sheeting Protective Pilings - S.F.P.C. 

251 Castings, Iron, Manhole Cover & Frame - Water-Hetch Hetchy 

306 Signs, Traffic - Public Works Traffic Engineering 



H. 



$107,804.00 
46,920.00 
30,551.00 
32,260.00 
22,154.08 

196,008.00 
33,600.00 
18,900.00 
23,781.36 
35,632.00 
34,276.64 
22,920.00 
22,250.00 
24,604.00 
37,074.51 
34,079.96 
20,000.00 
22,399.34 

681,280.00 
94,054.00 
62,401.46 
52,683.00 
69,962.00 
39,479.55 
28,434.00 
31,964.96 
19,934.67 
33,717.00 
83,520.00 
30,032.64 
72,703.67 
24,825.00 
21,450.96 
60,219.00 
68,000.00 
27,912.60 



OPERATIONS (CONTINUED) 



7. The commodity buyer for Janitorial supplies is a permanent 
member of a committee for the evaluation of such products. The 
membership of the committee is comprised of the supervisors of 
custodial services from all City departments. The committee has 
been meeting monthly since October 1970 and much progress has been 
made in standardizing Janitorial products. A primary example is 
in floor finish where a term contract has been established and the 
number of brands used throughout the City at any one time has been 
reduced from fifteen to one. A system of extensive testing of all 
Janitorial products has been instituted by the committee and 
interested parties are encouraged to submit their products for 
testing. The past year has seen the standardization of floor 
cleaning and wax stripping compounds and detergent sanitizer for 
use by all City departments. 

8. A continuing area of concentration for the Bureau of Buying 
was the problem of major equipment for S.F. General Hospital. To 
assure that all essential equipment would arrive in time to be 
installed and operational for the planned July 1976 opening, a 
record of each hospital requisition was kept on a separate log. 
All dates from receipt of requisition through bid mailing and 
opening dates; material received date; and date sent to controller 
for payment were closely followed and liaison maintained with the 
hospital to apprise them of the status. The total of such itemB 
procured for the fiscal year approximated $1,016,484.00. 



10 



CODING DIVISION 

The Coding Division operates as a part of the Bureau of Buying 
and is responsible for the development and application of the 
materials and supplies identification coding system, which is used 
by all City and County Departments. At the present time over 90,000 
items which the City stocks in its warehouses are individually coded, 

Considerable savings to the City in money, material, delivery 
time, and much follow-up correspondence had been realized from the 
inspection, by the Coding Section, of all incoming requisitions 
for material, supplies and equipment. By checking the Purchaser's 
item identification code number against the item and description, 
discrepancies are discovered in part numbers, sizes, prices, 
quantities, etc. These errors were corrected by coding and the 
involved department notified. 



The Coding Division however has never reached its true 
potential because it has never had access to the City computer. 
The Coding System, if properly programmed for computer operation 
could offer valuable information and assistance in the budgeting 
of City funds for materials, supplies, and equipment, and in the 
retrieval and preparation of statistical data about the expendi- 
ture of such funds. Over the past 3 years funding for the coding 
activity has been drastically reduced at the very time when the 
information it could supply has become most important. 

The total staffing now consists of a 1^0^ Clerk who through 
her own perseverence and personal ability, has been able to main- 
tain the system in an operational state and provide essential 
coding data to the various departments. An outstanding example 
of the effort involved was the complete review and cataloging of 
all medical items used at San Francisco General Hsopital and the 
present task of coding all of the parts and supplies for the 
repair and maintenance of the new City transit equipment. 

The Department will renew its efforts to obtain realistic 
funding of this operation in the next budget . 



11 



RE: Percent of Discounts taken and lost for the fiscal year 
1975 - 1976 





Discounts 
Available 


Discounts 
Taken 


Discounts 
Lost 


% Disc. 
Lost 


$ Disc. 
Taken 


July '75 


$ 7,279.13 


$ 6,476.36 


$ 


802.77 


12$ 


88$ 


Aug. 


9,601.10 


9,378.24 




222.86 


3$ 


97$ 


Sept. 


7,192.12 


6,522.27 




669.85 


9$ 


91$ 


Oct. 


11,481.86 


9,809.51 


1 


,672.35 


14$ 


86$ 


Nov. 


6,9^.39 


6,188.87 




755.52 


10$ 


90$ 


Dec. 


4,951.68 


4,835.04 




116.64 


3$ 


97$ 


Jan. »76 


14,748.43 


14,649.41 




99.02 


1$ 


99# 


Feb. 


8,435.66 


7,762.66 




673.00 


8$ 


92$ 


March 


6,357.58 


6,288.37 




69.21 


3$ 


97$ 


April 


6,194.02 


6,194.01 




-- 


0$ 


100$* 


May 


2,785.88 


2,785.88 




— 


0$ 


100$* 


June 


5,848.36 


5,826.19 




22.17 


1* 


99$ 



♦Since separation of S.F.U.S.D. purchasing function. 
TOTALS $91,820.20 $86,716.81 $5,103.39 6$ 94$ 



12 






REPRODUCTION BUREAU 



The Reproduction Bureau provides centralized service to all City 
Departments for photography, offset printing (up to 17" x 22"), 
mimeographing, ammonia printing (for architectural drawings), 
microfilming with an 1824 Xerox reproduction capability, and self 
service copiers. 

Funds to operate the Bureau are provided by Work Orders from the 
Departments . 

Our charges for services dropped from $337,000 in 1974-75 to 
$212,000 in 1975-76. Almost all the difference was due to the 
fact that the Yerba Buena plans were routed through and charged 
through our Bureau. We also had an overall reduction in the a- 
mount of work, although there was a steady increase in the number 
and length of reports, and of the quantities required. 

Mrs. Nata Ingmire, Blueprint Machine Operator, retired as of July 
1, 1976 after eleven years of service. 

Paper for the wet blueprint process became more difficult to get 
and the amount of work was greatly reduced; to the point that it 
was not practical for us to continue the process. The equipment 
was sold. Wet blueprints shall be done, as needed, by a contract 
vendor. We gained storage space which was promptly filled with 
paper supplies. 

The electrostatic plate material (for fast, medium quality dup- 
licating) has proven itself. It will save $3,000 to $4,000 per 
year in material costs. 

A change in Budget reproduction, from 11" x 17" offset to 8V * 
14" using a 9200 Xerox, greatly speeded the process for the Mayor's 
Budget planning. The 9200 Xerox's production potential is so great 
that one could handle perhaps 75% to 80% of the short run copy- 
duplicating now done in City Hall, on the many copiers scattered 
through the building. A single machine, with one or two less ex- 
pensive ones for single copies could save the City many thousands 
o dollars a year. 

We essentially completed microfilming the Recorder's Map Books, 
some 2300 pages and now are keeping up with the newly added pages. 
This provides both a measure of security and greatly improved ac- 
cess. We now provide copies in a few minutes, usually, rather 
than two or three days, as before. 



13 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT 

The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a central 
warehouse and storerooms in various City Departments; receives and issues 
materials, supplies and equipment for all departments of the City and 
County of San Francisco. This Bureau arranges for the sale of and sells 
surplus and obsolete personal property belonging to the City; exchanges 
equipment between departments and maintains a perpetual Inventory of all 
materials purchased for the City and County of San Francisco. The Bureau 
maintains control of the entire automotive fleet, including the registra- 
tion of City vehicles, listing, insurance and the reporting of all accidents; 
and the ordering and distribution of credit cards (lost or stolen and 
renewal ) . 

The following locations ere staffed and operated by the Bureau of 
Stores and Equipment: 

Name and Location Type Amount of Inventory 

Central Warehouse - 15th & Harrison Sts. Stationery $ 1 0, 5^6. 66 

Janitorial Supplies 5 f 328 . 73 

Dept. Public Works - 2323 Army Street 168,517-80 

Water Department - 1990 Newcomb Avenue 859,022.65 

Hetch Hetchy - Moccasin, California 58,074.60 

S.F. Intl. Airport - South San Francisco 85,682.73 

Municipal Railway - 24th & Utah Streets and 833. 193. 17* 

2 sub-stores 

General Store 423. 618. 75 

Potrero and sub-store 221,321.99 

Health Department - S.F. General Hospital, 317,009.44 

22nd & Potrero 

Laguna Honda Hospital, 780,773-00 

7th & Dewey 

Recreation & Park - Golden Gate Park 46,796.00 

Dept. Electricity - 901 Rankin Street 72,985-77 

Sheriff's Dept. - City Hall, Room 331 242,503-41 

Central Shop - 800 Quint Street 45,397-88 

$4,170,774.18 



14 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 



PERSONNEL 



The Sales, Inventory and Stores Division is staffed by the following: 



1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

12 Senior Storekeepers 
22 Storekeepers 
9 Assistant Storekeepers 

3 Assistant Storekeepers (CETA-Temporary) 
TOTAL 52 



SALES DIVISION 

Thirteen sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the authority of 
Section 7.100 of the Charter between our office and City Hall Purchasing. Sales 
activities included legal research into various aspects of different sales, pre- 
paration of sales, inviting interested buyers to bid, opening and awarding of bids, 
collecting and depositing all money received from buyers with the City Treasurer 
and keeping records of correspondence relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from the sale of 1975-1976 was $113,216.29. 
A general breakdown of the sales is as follows: 

Vehicles $29,900.13 

X-Ray Films 7,020.00 

Paper - IBM Cards 7,509.92 

Waste Oil 1,214.15 

Scrap Metal - Iron 49,195.82 

Grease and Bones 2,513.67 

Sacks and Containers 467.60 

Copperwire 12,684.50 

Camera 800.00 

Blue Print Machine 775.00 

Bookkeeping Machine 40.00 

Miscellaneous Equipment 1,095.50 



15 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIPMENT - Continued 
NVENTORY DIVISION 



This division controls the Equipment Inventory of all City Depart* 
ments; new equipment purchases are recorded and necessary papers are 
forwarded to Departments. We investigate and report to the Board of 
Supervisors on lost, damaged, or stolen I terns of equipment. We conducted 
surveys of Departments and updated the Perpetual Inventory records. 

We estimated or secured estimates from moving concerns for various 
moves required by City Departments. We recommended procedure, confer and 
set the dates and supply necessary materials for moving or other liaison 
detail. This division assisted in 58 moving estimates and/or actual 
departmental moves during this fiscal year. 

We arrange the disposal by sale of various Waste materials: such 
as Waste Paper, Tab Cards (IBM), X-Ray Film, and miscellaneous scrap 
metal. Surplus furniture and equipment is surveyed and made available to 
other City Departments by transfer. 

Due to a shortage of personnel at Central Warehouse, this division 
assisted In the preparation of stationery orders and handled all deliveries 
of stationery to various City Departments. 

STORES DIVISION 

The past fiscal year has been a very trying year in the storerooms. 
Getting replacements for the storerooms has been quite a chore. 

The following vacancies are creating a crisis situation: 

I Stores and Equipment Supervisor 
k Senior Storekeepers 
3 Storekeepers 
1 Inventory Clerk 

Vacations and sick leaves will force the closing of storerooms for 
periods of time, thereby seriously affecting the efficiency of the depart- 
ments which we serve and also Jeopardizing the savings of discounts on 
purchase orders and having craft workers waiting around for the lack of 
materials and supplies. The CETA employees service will no longer be 
ava i labl e as of 1977. 

The new storeroom at S.F. General Hospital was completed on April, 
1976; and a new storeroom at S.F. International Airport was completed during 
the fiscal year. Two new storerooms are still under construction at the 
Municipal Railway, which we expect to be completed late 1976 or early 1977. 



16 



CENTRAL SHOPS - ANNUAL REPORT 
1975 - 1976 

INTRODUCTION 



FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 
Electric Shop 
Pattern Shop 
Blacksmith Shop 
Paint Shop 
Upholstery Shop 

TRUCK & HEAVY EQUIPMENT SHOP 
Army St. D.P.W. Station 
19& Ave. D.P.W. Station 
Quint St. Station 
Tire Shop 

AUTO & LIGHT TRUCK SHOP 

MACHINE SHOP 

RECREATION & PaRK SHOP 

HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION 

CONCLUSION 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS & CHaRTS 



17 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

Section 7.100 of the Charter of the City and County of San 
Francisco provides that the Purchaser of Supplies shall have charge 
of a central garage and shop for the repair of City and County 
equipment. 

In compliance the Central Shops and allied facilities provide all 
necessary mechanical maintenance and repair service for all City 
departments and bureaus (exception Public Utilities). In addition, it 
is the responsibility of this Bureau to inspect, appraise and make 
recommendations on all City owned vehicles contemplated for replacement 
and to aid the various departments in the writing of specifications} to 
receive and approve all new vehicles delivered to the City, and to 
outfit and prepare these vehicles for service. 

Other Central Shops operations include Golden Gate Park Shop, 
providing maintenance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; 
Hall of Justice Service Station, where fuel and lubricants are provi- 
ded for Police and other City cars, along with inspection and light 
maintenance for Police vehicles. Department of Public Works, Army 
Street Yard, where fuels, lubricants, preventive maintenance and in- 
spection is provided Public Works vehicles, 19th Avenue Public Works 
Station, Health Department Garage, and Department of Electricity Garage, 

Administration of the Shops, under the Purchaser of Supplies, is 
the direct responsibility of Mr. Albert M. Flaherty, General Superin- 
tendent, aided by Mr. Edmond A. Rames, City Shops Assistant Superin- 
tendent. 

The Central Shops, Quint Street operation, has four main mainte- 
nance shop areas. They are 1) Automobile, 2) Truck and Heavy Equipment 
3) Fire Apparatus, 4) Machine; and the following auxiliary shops: 
Blacksmith, Pattern and Ladder Shop, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body and 
Fender, Tire, Service Station. 

Along with the responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of 
mechanical equipment in school buildings, sewage plants, pumping 
stations, public buildings, etc., the Shops maintain 2,913 units of 
the City owned automotive fleet. These vehicles and machines are - 
valued at approximatley 10.5 million dollars. 

The Bureau is staffed with 103 employees. 

Of these, 83 are funded Interdepartmentally in the 312 Budget 
while 20 are funded directly or through transfer in 311 Budget. 



18 



FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 

The Fire Apparatus Shop combined with five sub-shops, 
namely the Ladder Shop, Paint Shop, Electric Shop, Black- 
smith and Body Shop, and Upholstery Shop maintains all fire 
fighting equipment. 

This Shop is staffed with eight Automotive Machinists, 
two Hetalsmiths, two Painters, one Body and Fender Worker, 
one Upholsterer, one Chauffeur (Truck Driver) and one Auto- 
motive Serviceman. 

Shop supervision consists of one Auto Machinist Foreman, 
Ray Monti, and one Auto Machinist Sub Foreman, (temporarily 
vacant) • 

The Fire Shop and it's Sub Shops proceessed a total of 
2,403 jobs for the year. 

Included in the total of jobs completed on Fire Appara- 
tus were: 

1 Detroit Diesel engine major ovehaul. 

5 Major engine overhauls (gas) 

12 7 Minor engine overhauls and/or repairs 

153 Fire pump repairs. Gauges, Pressure-capacity change 
over valves, gates, water fitting leaks, pump screens 
etc. 

2 Complete fire pump overhauls 
16 Differential overhauls 

12 Broken axles 

6 Standard Transmission overhauls 

2 Automatic trasmission overhauls, major. 

16 Automatic transmission repairs and adjustments 

262 Brake repairs - reline - air leaks - air compressor 
repairs - MGM & MAX I Safety brake cylinders and - 
brake adjustments. 

3 7 Radiator repairs 

16 Clutch replacements 

103 100 ft. aerial repairs - Hydraulic leaks cables- 
valves - tank leaks bent and/or broken rungs - 
ladder locks - gauges. 

11 Pumper water tanks - sand blast - Weld tank leaks 
c.nd coat with rust resistant epoxy. 

256 Lube and Service jobs 

32 Chassis repairs - Springs - spring hargars - broken 
frames, steering gears. 

19 



Also included is the removal of usables parts such as 
ladder brackets, pegs, Gleason saddles, Scott cyl. brackets , 

red lites, sirens, small compartment boxes etc. from 9 - 
pumpers, 4 tractors and 3 City service trailers which were 
turned in and sold as surplus. 

Of the eight Automotive Machinist assigned to the Fire 
Shop, one is assigned to the San Francisco International - 
Airport, Fire Apparatus, one is assigned to the Electric Shop 
and one is our daily field Serviceman. 

The field Serviceman responded and made repairs to - 
1,266 jobs at Fire Stations through out the City with the - 
apparatus being out of service for a short period of time 
during minor repairs. 

The Automotive Machinist assigned to the San Francisco 
International Airport maintains and services all fire appara- 
tus and equiptment used by our fire fighting forces at the 
Airport. 



ELECTRIC SHOP 

A total of 312 jobs were completed in this Shop. The 
Electric Shop does the repairing of sirens, starters, genera- 
tors, alternators, regulators, portable electric power plants 
and water pumps, water-vacs, extension's cords high intensity 
flood lamps - portable flood lamps, chains saws, cement cut- 
ting saws, metal cutting saws - hi ex foam units - battery 
changees etc. Also included for the Electric Shop is the - 
maintenance of lights and wireing of the fire apparatus along 
with the installation of red lites - sirens air horn buttons 
on new equipment prior to placing them in service. 



PATT, :IJ SHOP 

This Shop is staffed by 2 Pattern-Makers. During the 
year they constantly inspect all 300 ladders used by the Fire 
Department. If any ladders are considered unsafe they are 
inmediatly replaced by a stock ladders and the damaged one 
taken to the shop for repairs and re-finishing, 49 ladders 
were rebuilt this year. 

Along with careful and professional inspection of ladders 
in service they design and make all new ladders of all sizes 
for the S.F.F.D., During the year they made up 2 new 50 ft. 
extension ladders and have just about completed the construc- 
tion of 4 new 35 ft. extension ladders. 

20 



All patters for the City high pressure system are care- 
fully maintained by the Pattern Shop. 

They estimate costs and make new patterns for various 
other City Departments, such as valves and fittings, water 
pump impellers, wear rings and related pump parts. 

They make patterns as needed and service other City 
departments such as the Recreation and Park Department, and 
the 3 water pollution control plants and pumping stations. 

Included in their work is the making up of various types 
and size jack blocks, wedge blocks, ladder blocks, small tool 
and equipment boxes, pumper hose bed duck boards, v/ooden 
dividers for aerial truck beds and wooden parts as needed as 
new equipment is placed in service. 

They also make up wood items for others shops such as 
ambulances, Truck Shop, and Police Shop. 



BLACKSMITH SHOP 



This shop is presently staffed with 2 Metalsmiths. 
There is one vacancy due to retirement which as yet has not 
been filled. 

The work performed in this shop are as follows: 

11 Water tanks welded for water leaks 

160 axes re-sharpened and or rehandled 

62 Mauls and sledge hammer re-handled 

6 Manufactured scott compt doors (Wards) 

2 serial tiller Cabs 

The Tow Truck, Salvage Co, one High Pressure Valve Unit, 
and the light wagon were outfitted by the Blacksmith Shop. 

The divider police car screens were installed by the 
Metalsmiths. 

The Blacksmith Shop manufactures new tools and repairs da- 
maged tools, straightens aerial ladders and ladder rungs, welds 
broken machinery parts and services other shops Machine Shop, 
Truck Shop and Police Shop. They do all the welding of worn 
hydrant stems and fire hydrant related parts. 

The Body and Fender Worker repairs all fire apparatus 
accidents and damaged apparatus body less. 



21 



A total of 44 apparatus were repaired and returned to 
service at a cost considerably less than estimates received 
from contractors. 

Where the Fire Department was not responsible for the 
accident the party causing the accident is billed for the 
damages and collections are returned to the departments 
maintenance and repair account, 

PAINT SHOP 



Staffed by 3 Painters 1 vacancy. Painters painted all 
damaged areas done by accidents and non accidents. Install 
seals, equipment numbers on new equipment, gold letter and 
gold leaf as neccessary to all spot repairs. Paint all - 
wooden blocks - hose bumpers - ceiling hooks - stencil covers- 
stencil equipment and station numbers on apparatus and - 
apparatus equipment. Scraped and varnished 32 various size 
Fire Department ladders. 



UPHOLSTERY SHOP 



Staffed by one Upholsterer (presently vacant by retire- 
ment) , 

Made various hypolan covers for Fire Apparatus and 
apparatus equipment such as hose bed covers, aerial truck bed 
covers, hose bed covers for the 3 squirts - compartment covers 
for the snorkel. Make up special equipment covers such as 
air-ex fan, porta-power box - hydraulic jacks, norton jacks - 
etc. Make up firemans belts with axe holder, flashlight hol- 
der, hydrant wrench, etc. Repair and make up new truckmens 
safety belts, firemen safety belts, ladder straps. Re-uphols- 
ters Auto, Truck and Fire Apparatus seats, re-upholsters 
furniture for various departments. Makes up rubber gaskets 
for hose fittings, Keystone valves, outlet and inlet gate 
caps, 1 1 5 hose lines, 1" hose lines, and miscellaneous gaskets 
made of various materials for different applications in the 
assembly of pumps, engines, compressors, etc. 

The Fire Apparatus Shop, along with routine maintenance 
and repair, outfits and prepare for service all new or repla- 
cement apparatus. 

Where it is to the financial benefit of the City major 
modifications and modernizing is often made on existing appa- 
ratus. 



In September of 1975 this Shop equipped and placed in 
service the S.F.F.D. Tow Truck. It is a Ford L 9,000 chassis 
powered with a Detroit 8 V-71 diesel engine, Fuller five 



22 



speed syncromesh transmission with a Dana two speed auxilliary 
transmission. 

Mounted on the chassis is a Holms model 750 twin exten- 
dable booms wrecker. Among the towing features of this appa- 
ratus, it can be use for various highway accidents and cliff 
rescue operations. 

Also equipt for service this fiscal year is a 1976 Ford 
Salvage Company and one 1975 GMC Valve unit for the High 
Pressure System. 

A unique project completed was the conversion of an an- 
tique light wagon to a modern, high lumin unit. 

The truck body was reused and the obsolete generator and 
lights were replaced with a modern high efficency generator 
and boom light unit which is nested in a horizontal position 
for traveling. 

When placed in operation, the boom is raised to a verti- 
cal position, can be extended to 40 feet and is capable of 
360 degree rotation. The electrical generator is Diesel po- 
wered, 12.5 K'.V 120/240 Volts 60 cycle AC. Boom lamps con- 
sist of one 1,000 watt quartz Iodine wide beam lamp, two 
1,000 watt metalarc wide beam lamps, and two 1,500 watt 
metalarc narrow beam lamps equipped with individual vertical 
aimers which are controlled from the operator panel to raise 
and lower beams separately. 

This unit has the capacity of lighting up an area the 
size of Kezar Stadum. It was placed in service October of 
1975. 



TRUCK SHOP 

The Truck Shop is staffed with 9 Auto Machinist, 2 Auto 
Servicemen, 1 Metalsmith under the Supervision of Foreman 
.-.rthur Chin. ^.lso under the Supervision of the Truck Shop 
are 4 Sub Shops. They are: 



ARMY ST. DPW STATION -Staf f ed with 1 automotive Machinist Sub- 
Foreman, 2 Automotive Machinist, 1 Automotive Serviceman Sub 
Foreman and 3 Auto Servicemen. Operating from 7 a.m. to Mid- 
night - Monday - Friday. 



23 



Igtjj AVE. DPW SERVICE STATION - Staffed with 1 Auto Serviceman, 
QUINT ST. SERVICE STATION - 1 Auto Serviceman. 
QUINT ST. TIRE SHOP - 2 Auto Servicemen. 

The Truck Shop is responsible for the maintenance and 
repairs of automotive equipment of various City Departments, 
They can range from road graders to lawn mowers. Below is 
a partial list 

Dump Trucks Street Mechanical Sweepers Vans 

Street Rollers Street Water Flushers Busses 

Asphalt Paver Garbage Compactors Concrete Saws 

Asphalt Spreader Sewer Eductors Tree Chippers 

Tool Heaters Sewer Jet Rodders Pumps 

Cranes Ambulances Compressors 

Tractors Backhoes 



1,655 job orders were processed during the 1975-76 fis- 
cal year. They can range from a complete engine overhaul to 
minor repairs and adjustments. Completed jobs by categories 
are: 

140 Brake Repairs 

38 Complete Brake Overhauls 

148 Clutch Repairs 

32 Complete Clutch Overhauls 

92 Transmission Repairs 

16 Complete Transmission overhauls 

28 Steering repairs 

138 Engine Tune Ups 
61 Engine Repairs 

8 Complete Engine Overhauls 

95 Alternator - Generator Overhauls 

96 Charging Circuit Repairs 
112 Starter Overhauls 

82 Carburater Overhauls 

123 Road Calls 

97 Tows 

38 Exhaust System Repairs 

68 Battery Replacement 

12 Accident Repairs 

78 Radiator Repairs 

19 Radiator Recores 

142 Blacksmith Fabricating Jobs 

139 Various minor repairs 



24 



In addition the Truck Shop, through its foreman, is res- 
ponsible for the operations of these four sub shops. 

Quint Street Service Station 

Gasoline Dispensed 163,483 gal. 

Oil Dispensed 7,780 qts. 

Vehicles lubed and serviced 943 



19tb Avenue Station 



Gasoline dispensed 54,307 gal, 

Oil dispensed 1,100 qts, 

Vehicles lubed and serviced 42 



Quint Street Tire Shop 

New Tires mounted 1,344 

Recap tires mounted 769 

Wheels switched 50 

Road calls 266 

Tires repaired 636 



Department of Electricity Garage 

Vehicles lubed and serviced 136 

Road Calls 18 

Minor repairs 52 

Health Department Garage 

Lube & Service 129 

Tires 22 

Minor repairs 48 

,iRi-»i STRtiLT (DPW) STaTIUN 

This service facility is located in D.P.W. maintenance 
and vehicle storage yard at 2323 Army Street. 

Its function is to provide minor maintenance and repairs, 
preventive maintenance, fuels and luijricants to the fleet of 
the Department of Public Works automotive equipment. Services 
are available from 7:00 A.M. to midnight, five (5) days per 
week. 



25 



The Station is staffed with one Automotive Serviceman 
Sub-Foreman and one Automotive Machinist on the day watch. 

The bulk of the service is provided between 4:00 P.M. 
and midnight. Night staff consists of Automotive Machinist 
Sub-Foreman, Rene Mir, one Automotive Machinist and three 
Automotive Servicemen. 

On this watch vehicles are run through the fuel and ins- 
pection lanes - receive minor repairs and required lubrica- 
tion service. 

The fiscal year saw 2,530 various repair and 698 service 
jobs completed. 256,076 gallons of gasoline were dispensed 
along with 703 gallons of kerosene, 2,113 gallons of lube oil 
and 2,416 gallons diesel fuel. 

114 various units of automotive equipment were routed 
to the Central Shops for correction of major defects. 

A parking bay, adjacent to the service station, was de- 
veloped into a service and inspection area for motorized 
street sweepers. This service works in conjunction with 
the Street Cleaning Bureau's expanded program of mechanical 
sweeping of controlled parkiny streets throughout the City. 

Night maintenance and service on these machines provi- 
des for maximum operating efficiency and day lijht sweeping 
time. 



AUTO SHOP - LIGHT TRUCK SHOP 

The Automobile - Light Truck Shop is responsible for the 
maintenance and repair of 751 automobiles, 294 light trucks 
and 299 motorcycle vehicles. 

Permanent staff consists of eight Auto Mechanics, two - 
Automotive Servicemen, two Body & Fender Workers and One Auto 
Painter under the direction of Foreman Ld Franke. 

Repair job orders completed this fiscal year were 3,270 
(3,428 jobs previous year). 

Included were: 

802 Brake jobs 

525 Tune up and performance tests 

144 Radiator - cooling system overhauls 

117 Automatic transmission overhauls 

83 Automatic transmission service 

37 Clutch overhauls 

24 Valve grinds 

20 Engine Overhauls 

230 Road calls and tows 

1,030 Miscellaneous jobs completed 



26 



Accident damage repairs totaled 262. In many cases - 
salvaged body parts from our stocks permitted us to repair the 
damaged vehicle at a fraction of the normal cost and time. 

The plurality of jobs processed through this Shop are for 
the Police Department. 

Priority of repair is given these cars along with those of 
the other emergency services. 

Due to a freeze on funding replacement Police cars were 
not purchased and delivered mid fiscal year as is usual though 
the money was finally released in June 1976.This delay neces- 
sitated continual work on the old cars throughout the entire 
fiscal year. 

A total of 1,276 repair jobs were completed in this Shop 
on Police vehicles. 

Replacement and/or new vehicles received for the various 
emergency services were equipped for their particular assign- 
ment - Included were: 

25 Police - Black & White 

15 Police - Undercover 

4 Police Patrol Vans 

9 Fire Department Chiefs cars 

8 Sheriff Department Vans and Autos 

This Shop suffered the separation of two mechanics who 
retired this past fiscal year. 

The loss of their production in the maintenance of an 
automotive fleet that is generally over age is developing a 
serious back log of unrepaired vehicles that cannot be - 
processed through the Shop in a timely manner. 



MACHINE SHOP 

The Machine Shop is staffed with 9 Maintenance Machinists 
(one position unfilled) and 1 Maintenance Machinist Foreman 
Mr. John J. Raos. During the fiscal year 1975-76 the Machine 
Snop performed a total of 725 jobs. 

The areas in which this Shop services are in the Public 
Schools Boiler Room repairing and servicing circulating pump; 
heat blower fans and heat pumps. 

The Machine Shop maintains and services all Machine Shop 
tools and hand tools of the Industrial *xts Section of the 
School Department. The repairing and servicing of metal 
turning lathes milling machines, Print Shop equipment, Sheet 
Metal and Wood working tools. 



27 



The Park and Recreation Department requires our services 
in the repair and over-hauling of numerous irrigation and 
sewerage pumps. Located thru out the Park system. 

The Machine Shop section repairs all boiler room equip- 
ment required to heat and ventilate all the buildings of the 
Community College. The repair and modifying the safety lock 
system on the bleachers in the men's gym. 

The Machine Shop makes and repairs parts for the low 
pressure and high pressure hydrants located thru out the City 
such as - hydrant spindles ,king valves, nozzle gates. One 
Machinist is assigned to repair the Fire Departments tools 
and hardware carried on all the Fire Apparatus, all types of 
pressure and vacuum guages the over-hauling and servicing of 
the high pressure equalizing valve, better known in the Fire 
Department as the Gleason Valve, the repair and servicing of 
all types of Fire Hose shut off valves and the repair of the 
3 way portable monitor. The Machine Shop keeps in repair the 
breathing oxygen air compressors anJ their related equipment. 

The Sewer Treatment Plants consisting of Richmond Sunset, 
North Point, and the South Last Plant are kept in repair with 
the assistance of 4 Machinists under the supervison of the 
Machine Shop Foreman. 

The Maintenance Machinist in these plants, maintain and 
repair machinery necessary to carry out a 24 hour operation. 

Jobs completed by these machinists are as follows. The 
repair of the Bar Racks in the sediment tanks and the Grit 
Tanks. The re-newal of sprockets, shafts, electric motor, 
bearings, the overhaul sludge - pumps, sand pumps, change 
bearings, and service large vent fan assemblies. Over-hauling 
various sizes of rootes blowers and chlorine valves. 

The high pressure water system in providing water neces- 
sary to fight large fires in the City, requires the services 
of the Machine Shop in keeping in top condition pumping ma- 
chinery, and the repairing and making of parts for the various 
fire hydrants located thru out the City. 

The Hose Shop is a sub-section of the Machine Shop. 
This unit is charged with the inspection, repair and distri- 
bution of all Fire Hose. 

During the past fiscal year 1975 - 1976 25,000 feet of 
new hose was inspected, tested, labelled and distributed to 
the various Fire Department companies. 

Over 10,000 feet of ins<irvice Fire Hose was inspected, 
repaired and sent back to the Fire companies. 



28 



RECREATION AND PARK SHOP 

This repair facility is located in the Golden Gate Park 
maintenance yard at 3rd Ave. and South Drive. Here mecha- 
nical maintenance and services are provided all automotive 
equipment and power driven horticultural machines used in park 
maintenance throughout the City. 

This Shop is normally staffed with five (5) Automotive 
Machinists, one automotive Serviceman and supervised by Fore- 
man James Elliot. They maintain 191 various autos, trucks 
and heavy motorized machines along with 468 various power 
driven units. 

Job orders completed during this fiscal year totaled 
1,331 and include the 

1) Complete engine and hydraulic system overhaul of 
a 1968 Case Back Hoe. 

2) Major overhaul and rebuild of three medium duty 
truck engines 

3) Major overhaul of Weed cutting barge - used for 
clearing unwanted growth from lake bottoms. 

4) Repair of extensive corrosion damage to Zoo ferti- 
lizer truck. 

5) Complete overhaul and rebuilding of 28 Spartan grass 
cutting units for Park master gang mowers. 

6) Major overhaul of 22 rotary mowers. 

Production from this Shop fell off this fiscal year to 
1,331 from the 2,058 jobs completed the previous year - this 
was caused by a retirement of a veteran employee and the 
resignation of another. This coupled with the strike lost 
is 371 man days of work. An effort was made to balance this 
loss of in shop acitivity by the accelerated use of private 
contractors services. The budget however, limits our expen- 
datures in this area. 

It is expected that the next fiscal year, 1976-77, will 
see a release of frozen employment requisitions so that this 
shop might be again properly staffed and production returned 
to normal. 



29 



HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STATION 

This branch of the Central Shops is located at 950 Bryant 
St., west of the Hall of Justice. It provides fuel and service 
to Police Department vehicles and supplies gasoline and oil to 
other City vehicles. The station is operated 7 days a week - 
from 7 A.M. to midnight and is staffed with nine (-1) Automotive 
Servicemen, three Automotive Mechanics and one Automotive Mecha- 
nic Sub-Foreman. 

The convenient down-town location and the accelerated - 
useage of Police vehicles make this a high volume distribution 
point of fuel and lubricants for City vehicles. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 



Gasoline Dispensed 



Police Department 
Other Departments 



Total 



495,106 gallons 
150.194 gallons 

645,300 gallons 



Oil Dispensed 

Police Department 
Other Departments 



12,764 quarts 
972 quarts 



Total 13,736 quarts 



Tow Jobs (Autos) 

Tires Changed (new) 

Tires repaired 

Battery Service (New & charged) 

Lube and Service jobs 

Mechanical repairs 

Brake reline jobs 



984 
1,404 

291 

194 
1,940 
6,911 

248 



Motorcycle Service 

Lube & Service 

Tire changes 

Batteries 

Repairs 

Tows 



495 

265 

111 

3,487 

92 



30 



The motorcycle preventive maintenance and service program 
was improved upon at this station, with the assignment of an 
Automotive Mechanic to perform scheduled services and make emer- 
gency repairs on the fleet of 303 various Police Motorcycles. 

The production realized from this work program is expected 
to permit a marked savings in contractual motorcycle repairs in 
the comming fiscal year. 



CONCLUSION 



The fiscal year 19 75-76 saw the continuance of maximum 
effort by the Central Shops to fulfill their work responsibi- 
lities within the limits of budget appropriations. 

A comparative review of units of services produced this 
fiscal year with the previous year 1974-75 shows. 

1974-75 1975-76 

Major repairs 10,821 9,384 

Minor repairs and Services 17,995 22,573 

Total Dollars Expended $2,867,002.00 $2,799,341.00 

A reduction in shop craft personnel due to an inordinate 
number of separations from the staff coupled with the freeze of 
personnel requisitions had a negative effect on shop production 
as did the five week period of the craft strike. 

Major repair jobs - essential to the up keep of an aging 
fleet of motorized equipment, fell behind for the first time in 
recent shop history. 

Aside from these unplanned reductions in staff the Central 
Shops for the past several years, has been developing a negative 
ratio between automotive craftsmen and equipment maintained. 

The year 1959, when the Shops were consolidated in their 
new location, 63 Automotive crafts men and service men maintained 
1,573 units of automotive equipment. 



31 



A gradual increase over the years to 1976 provided for 70 
automotive tradesmen an 11% increase maintaining 2,939 units of 
automotive equipment for an 87% increase. 

The situation boils down to "insufficient staff and/or 
dollars to properly maintain a working fleet thct is constantly 
expanding and exists without the implementation of a replacement 

program" . 

The forthcoming fiscal year, offers little improvement in 
this area. 'we again must look foreward to spiraling operating 
costs and increased down-time as extensive maintenance and - 
repairs are required to keep the fleet in a safe and operable 
condition. 

Private industry has recognized that automotive equipment 
has a predicted economic life span. Governmental agencies - 
generally agree with this concept and have initiated programs 
of timely replacement. 



Many cities are coordinating the responsibility for their 
essential in-service transportation operation within a single 
bureau or department. That division acquires the vehicles and 
then "leases" them to the operating departments for a flat - 
periodic fee that would include operating expenses and a depre- 
ciation factor. At the end of a predetermined useful life a 
reserve fund has been accumulated for replacement. We should 
continue to investigate and consider the advantages of such a 
policy. 



32 



CENTRAL SHOPS 





ANNUAL 


REPORT 






DEPARTMENTAL 


EXPENDITURES 






1975 ■ 


- 1976 




DEPT. 




WORK ORDERS 




NO. 


DEPARTMENT 

Adult Probation 


RECEIVED 


EXPENDED 


Ill 


$ 1,500.00 i 


887.05 


113 


Art Commission 


1,200.00 


1,235.02 


115 


Assessor 


1,000.00 


265.56 


117 


City attorney 


555.00 


513.61 


119 


City Planning 


1,275.00 


1,309.20 


121 


Civil Service 


115.00 


79.00 


123 


Controller 


700.00 


99.64 


131 


Emergency Services 


1,400.00 


1,214.10 


141 


District rtttorney 


2,350.00 


2,683.65 


145 


Fire Department 


445,957.00 


453,991.17 


145.1 


Equipment and Hoses 


160,000.00 


159,947.52 


145.3 


High Pressure 


17,000.00 


18,057.00 


151 


Mayor 


2,500.00 


1,521.81 


154 


Model Cities 


8,025.00 


7,508.35 


161 


Police 


442,075.00 


451,143.93 


161 MR 


Motorcycles 


84,000.00 


77,621.57 


165 


Public Defender 


2,229.00 


2,406.04 


169 


Social Services 


12,520.00 


11,848.71 


170 


Single Men's Rehab. 


400.00 


924.56 


173 


Sheriff 


25,293.00 


25,593.17 


181 


Supervisors 


1,620.00 


1,577.04 


185 


Probation Office 


8,500.00 


8,211.82 


187 


Log Cabin 


3,400.00 


3,113.20 


188 


Hidden Valley 


2,700.00 


1,822.59 


213 


Academy of Science 


800.00 


1,233.17 


221 


Chief Admin. Officer 


300.00 


607.00 


223 


Coroner 


4,170.00 


4,321.57 


233 


Electricity 


16,294.00 


14,823.40 


243 


Public Administrator 


2,200.00 


1,788.90 


245 


Real Estate 


245.00 


286.68 


255 


Registrar 


1, 186.40 


1,193.33 


261 


Tax Collector 


2,200.00 


2,176.96 


265 


Weights and Measures 


2,000.00 


2,119.87 


311 


Purchasing 


850.00 


1,000.38 


413 


architecture 


3,550.00 


3,645.99 


415 


Building Inspection 


16,277.00 


12,813.89 


417 


Building Repair 


40,295.00 


35,401.38 


417.2 


Traffic Painting 


10,538.00 


7,676.17 


421 


Engineering 


14,678.00 


14,054.78 


423 


General Office 


675.00 


581.46 


424 


Personnel administration 1,200.00 


1,275.83 


425 


Sewage Pump 


2,270.00 


1, 761.69 


427 


Sewage Treatment 


5,500.00 


2,857.77 


429 


Sewer Repair 


67,121.00 


67,440.39 


431 


Street Cleaning 


140,716.00 
33 


128,617.58 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DEFT. 




AMOUNT 






NO. 


DEPARTMENT 


AFFROFRIATLD 


EXPENDED 


431.1 


Broom Cores 


$ 12,652.00 $ 


9 


060.28 


431.3 


Garageman 


19,462.00 


17 


736.88 


431.4 


Auto Machinist 


63,769.00 


50 


622.83 


513 


Administration 


2,000.00 


3 


216.52 


531 


Food & Sanitation 


10,550.00 


9 


912.52 


535 


Health Centers 


1,320.00 


1 


219.73 


551 


Emergency Hospital 


52,050.00 


49 


352.93 


553 


Hassler Home 


200.00 




387.63 


555 


Laguna Honda 


4,400.00 


3 


873.65 


557 


S.F. Hospital 


3,500.00 


3 


957.49 


567 


Mental Health 


9,300.00 


8 


566.23 


577 


Bureau of Alcoholism 


1,500.00 


1 


143.57 


621 


De Young Museum 


400.00 




272.28 


631 


Library 


3,500.00 


3 


258.65 


651 


Recreation & Park 


229,254.00 


228 


179.20 


651.9 


Recreation & Park - General 


3,500.00 


3 


237.92 


653 


Candlestick Park 


3,000.00 


1 


282.64 


661 


School District 


61,000.00 


53 


454.40 


669 


City College 


22,400.00 


18 


413.57 


681 


Street Repair 


119,652.00 


119 


805.17 


681. AS 


Army Street 


38,767.00 


37 


163.53 


683 


Traffic engineering 


15,939.00 


13 


078.81 


686 


Street Flanting 


14,171.00 


13 


200.97 


725 


Airport 


26,000.00 


24 


025.74 


775 


Port Commission 


349.73 




349.73 



$2,278,015.13 $ 2,214,026.37 

Add: Funds budgeted and expended 207,833.87 216,924.63 
for special Work Orders 

Surplus 54.898.00 



$2.485.849.00 $ 2.485,849.00 



34 



HOW CLNTRAL SHOPS SPENT WORK ORDERS (312) 
DURING THE YEAR 19 75-76 




GRAND TOTAL WORK ORDERS 
1974-75 COMPARISON 



$ 2,430,951.00 
$ 2,530,741.00 



35 



cei;tr/vL shops 

annual Report 
1975-1976 
Comparison of Expenditures with Amount Budgeted 



INDEX 










BUDGETED 




EXPENDED 


312 


SUMMARY 








1975-76 




1975-76 


110 


Permanent Salaries 






$ 


124,692.00 


$ 


115,155.00 


111 


Overtime 








1,710.00 




1,456.00 


112 


Holiday Fay 








528.00 




493.00 


130 


Wages 






1, 


,508,001.00 


1 


,263,647.00 


200 


Contractual Services 








198,886.00 




231,670.00 


300 


Materials & Supplies 








396,100.00 




496,348.00 


800 


Fixed Charges 








56.00 




56.00 


863 


Mandatory Frinye Denefi 


ts 




322,126.00 




322,126.00 




Sub- 


To 


tal 


5 2, 


,552,0-39.00 


S 2 


.430.951.00 



•Central Shops Budget $2,552,099.00 

Actual work Orders received $ 2,485,849.00 
Less: Total Expenditures ( 2,430,951.00) 
Unexpended Balance t 54.898.00 

INDEX BUDGET. ,D EXPEN 

311 SU.i^RY 1975-76 1975-76 

110 Permanent salaries % 52,913.00 $ 52,913.00 

131 Holiday Pay an. Overtime 3,536.00 3,067.00 
130 VJages 235,416.00 213,146.00 

132 Temporary ..ages 10,547.00 6,600,00 
863 :.andatory Fringe Benefits 6 5.9 78.00 65.97L.00 

$ 3o8, 390.00 £ 346,704.00 

Unexpended Balance S 21. 666. 00 

i 368.390.00 S 368,3^0^00 

36 



HOW CENTRAL SHOPS SPENT 311 & 312 FUNDS 
DURING THE YEAR 19 75-76 




GRAND TOTAL 19 75-76 
GRAND TOTAL 19 74-75 



$ 2,799,341.00 
% 2,^167,002.000 



37 



UNITS of city-owned vehicles by department 

PER IBM INVENTORY RUN AS OF JUNE 30. 19 76 



DEPT. 


NO. 


OF 


DEPT. 


NO. 


, OF 


NO. 


DEPARTMENT VEHICLES 


NO. 




DEPARTMENT VEHICLES 


Ill 


ADULT PROBATION 


8 






PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT 


113 


ART COMMISSION 


5 


513 




ADMINISTRATION 


7 


115 


ASSESSOR 


2 


525. 


,1 


COMM. DISEASE 


2 


117 


CITY ATTORNEY 


2 


531 




food & sanitary insp. 


31 


119 


CITY PLANNING 


2 


535 




HEALTH CENTERS 


5 


121 


CIVIL SERVICE COMM. 


1 


539 




PUB. HEALTH NURSING 


1 


123 


CONTROLLER 


1 


551 




EMERGENCY HOSPITALS 


16 


131 


S.F. DISASTER CORPS. 


5 


553 




HASSLER HOSPITAL 


4 


141 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 


19 


555 




LAGUNa HONDA HOSP. 


12 


145 


FIRE DEPARTMENT 


264 


1 557 




S.F.GEN.HOSFITAL 


15 


154 


MODEL CITIES PROGRaM 


13 


1 561 




MENTAL aDMIN. 


2 


161 


POLICE DEPARTMENT 


371 


567 




MENTAL, HE/vLTH 


10 


165 


PUBLIC JEFENDER 


5 


577 




BUR. OF ALCOHOLISM 


3 


169 


SOCIAL SERVICES 

SINGLE MEN'S REHAB. 


41 
2 










170 


621 




DE YOUNG MUSEUM 


3 


173 


SHlRIFF 


54 


631 




PUBLIC LIBRARY 


7 


181 


BOARD of supervisors 


1 


651 




REC.& PARK-GENERAL 


191 


185 


JUVENILE COURT 


21 


651- 


-S 


REC.& PmRK-NON-AUTO 


468 


187 


J. CLOG CABIN 


6 


653 




candlestick park 


10 


188 


HIDDEN VaLLEY SCHOOL 


2 










213 


CA. ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 


8 




S.F. UNIFIED SCHOOL DIST. 




221 


CHIEF ADMN. OFFICER 


1 










223 


CORONER 


7 


661- 


■B 


JOHN O'COHNELL 


5 


233 


DEPT. OF ELECTRICITY 


43 


661- 


-E 


SHOP TRUCKS 


20 


243 


PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR 


3 


661- 


-F 


Gardeners autos, etc. 


28 


245 


REAL ESTATE 


1 


661- 


-G 


DELIVERY TRUCKS 


14 


247 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


4 


661- 


-H 


ADMINISTRATION 


10 


255 


REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 


1 


661- 


■J 


DELIVERY, FURNITURE 


8 


261 


TAX COLLECTOR 


7 


669 




CITY COLLEGE 


43 


265 


WEIGHTS & MEASURES 


10 










311 


PURCHASING-MAIN OFFICE 


4 


775 




S.F. PORT COMMISSION 


71 


312 


PURCHASING-CENTRAL SHOPS 


39 






DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 






DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 




681 




DPW-STREET REPAIR 


101 


413 


ARCHITECTURE 


8 


683 




BUREAU OF ENGINEERING 


35 


415 


BLDG. INSPECTION 


45 


686 




DPW-TREE PLANTING 


48 


415.1 


F.A.C.E. PROGRAM 


5 










417 


BLDG. REPAIR 


121 






SUB-TOTAL 2, 


,640 


417.2 


traffic painting 


27 


161- 


■M 


POLICE SOLOS 


91 


421 


ENGINEERING 


40 


161- 


-M 


POLICE 3 WHEELS 


150 


423 


G^NERnL OFFICE 


2 


161- 


■S 


POLICE SCOOTERS 


39 


424 


PERSONNEL ADMN. 


3 


161- 


-T 


POLICE TRaIL BIKES 


19 


425 


SEWAGE PUMPING 

SEWaGE treatment 


3 
26 










427 






429 


SEWdR REPAIR 


111 






GKaND TOT..L 2, 


,939 


431 


STREET CLEANING 


126 











38 



CENTRAL SHOPS EMPLOYMENTS 

1975 - 1976 Budget 
Index 311 & 312 



PER 6-30-76 

FUNDED BUT VACANT 
POSITIONS DUE TO 
RETIREMENT t PROMOTIONS , ETC , 



1 7150 City Shops General Sup't. 

1 7277 City Shops Assistant Sup't. 

1 1652 Sr. Accountant 

1 1222 Sr. Payroll & Personnel Clerk 

1 1424 Clerk Typist 

1 1630 Account Clerk 

1 1632 Sr. Account Clerk 



103 



7381 Upholsterer 
7389 Metalsmith 

01 Chauffeur (Truck Driver) 
7249 Auto Mechanic Foreman 

7382 Auto Mechanic Sub-Foreman 
7381 Auto Mechanic 

7254 Auto Machinist Foreman 

7315 Auto Machinist Sub-Foreman 

7313 Automotive Machinist 

7412 Automotive Serviceman Sub-Foreman 

7410 Automotive Serviceman 

7309 Car and Auto Painter 

7358 Pattern Maker 

7306 Body and Fender Worker 

7258 Maintenance Machinist Foreman 

7332 Maintenance Machinist 

Permanent Positions 



1 
14 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL TEMPORARY EMPLOYEES 

2 7313 Automotive Machinist (Mechanical Street Sweepers) 
_2 7381 Automotive Mechanic _1_ 

4 Temporary Positions 



* Defunded in 1976 - 1977 Fiscal Year 



39 



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41 



PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 



1974-75 



1975-76 



General 



Purchase 

Orders 



Amount 



Purchase 

Orders 



Amount 



13431 $ 14,069,190 12430 $ 12,539,423 



Education 8018 



6,029,496 



7558 



5,303,784 



Health 



5537 



6,347,948 



5325 



5,590,383 



Utilities 5983 



6,545,860 



5726 



5,768,514 



32969 $ 32,992,494 



31039 $ 29,202,104 



Purchase by 
Encumbrance Request 



1974-75 



$ 74,841,892 



1975-76 



$ 67,649,000 



Purchase thru 
Contract Certification 



3,000,000 



12,076,484 



Grand Total 



79,725,484 



■42- 



9o 
a. 



REPRODUCTION 
DIVISION 






BUYING 
DIVISION 



CITY & COUNTY OF 
SAN FRANCISCO 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
ANNUAL REPORT 
1976-1977 



DOCUMENTS 
OCT ] 
gi&SStii 



PERSONNEL 
& ACCOUNTS 
DIVISION 



STORES & 

EQUIPMENT 

DIVISION 



CENTRAL 

SHOPS 

DIVISION 



September, 1977 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FISCAL YEAR 
1976 - 1977 



City and County 

of 
San Francisco 




Purchasing Department 

-BUYING DIVISION 
-PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS DIVISION 
-STORES & EQUIPMENT DIVISION 
-REPRODUCTION DIVISION 
-CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 



JOSEPH C. GAVIN 
PURCHASER OF SUPPLIES 



COMPILED BY 
JUDITH MATRANGA 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

PROLOGUE I 

ORGAN I ZAT I ON 2 

SEPARAT I ONS & WORK ACCOMPL I SHED 4 

BUYING DIVISION 5-13 

Procurement 5 

Operations 6 

Cod i ng D 1 v I s i on 12 

PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS DIVISION 14-15 

Bid Section 14 

Payroll Section 14 

Accounting Section 14 

Accounts Payable Section 15 

STORES & EQUIPMENT SECTION 16-19 

Inventory Section 17 

Stores Section 18 

Sales Section 19 

REPRODUCT I ON D I V I S I ON 20 

CENTRAL SHOPS D I V I S I ON 21-44 

I ntroduct i on 22-25 

Fire Apparatus Shop 23 

E I ectr I c Shop 24 

Pattern & Ladder Shop 24 

Bl acksml th Shop 24 

Pa i nt Shop 25 

Uphol stery Shop 25 

Truck & Heavy Equipment Shop 26-27 

Army Street D.P.W. Station 26 

19th Avenue D.P.W. Station 26 

Quint Street Station 26 

T i re Shop 26 

Auto & Light Truck Shop 27- 

Mach i ne ShoD 28 

Recreation & Park Shop 29 

Hall of Justice Service Station 30 

Cone I us i on 32 

F i nanc i a I Statements & Charts 33-44 



City and County of San Francisoo 

fit -^l*r »A 



Purchasing Department 

September 14, 1977 



Mr. Roger Boas 

Chief Administrative Officer 

City and County of San Francisco 

289 City Hal I 

San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mr. Boas: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year 

ending June 30, 1977 Is submitted herewith .In accordance with the 

provisions of Section 3.501 of the Charter of the City and County 

of San Francisco. 

Very truly yours, 

JOSEPH C. GAVIN 
Purchaser of Suppl les 



(415)558-5026 



Room 270, City Hall 



San Francisco 94102 



ORGANIZATION CHART 



City and County of San Francisco 
Purchasing Department 



[CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER] 



PURCHASER OF SUPPLIES 

ASST. DIRECTOR OF 
PURCHASING & SERVICES 



BUYING DIVISION 

Asst. Dlr. of Purchasing & Servicesd] 

- Sr. Clerk Typist (I ) 
Sr. Purchaser - Specification & 

Standard i zatlon( I ) 
Sr. Purchaser - Buying Staff (I) 
Sr. Purchaser - S.F. General Hosp.(l) 
Sr. Purchaser - Municipal Railway(l) 
Purchaser (6) 
Purchaser - Printinq(2) 



Codi ng Section 
Coding Supervi sor ( I ) 
Clerkd ) 



CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 

City Shops General Superl ntendent( I ) 

City Shops Asst. Superl ntendent( I ) 

Sr . Accountant( I ) 

Sr. Account CI erk( I ) 

Account C lerk( I ) 

Sr. Payro I I -Personnel Clerkd) 

Clerk Typistd ) 

Auto Mach. Supervi sor(3) 

Auto Mach. Asst. Supervi sor (2) 

Auto Machinist(25) 

Auto Service Worker (25) 

Metal smith (4) 

Car-Auto Pa Inter (4) 

Patternmaker (2) 

Uphol sterer ( I ) 

Chauf feurd ) 

Auto f.ervice Worker Asst. Super. (I) 

Auto Mechanic Supervi sor ( I ) 

AutoMech. Asst. Supervi sor ( I ) 

Auto Mechanic (II) 

Body Fender Worker (3) 

Maintenance Mach. Supervi sor( I ) 

Mai ntenance Machi ni st (9) 



■Stenographic Secretary 
•Sr. Clerk Typist 



X 



PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS DIVISION 

Chief Clerkd ) 

Principal Clerkd) 

Sr . Accountant ( I ) 

Payro I I Clerkd ) 

Sr. Clerkd ) 

Sr. Clerk Typlst(6) 

Clerk(6) 

Clerk Typlst(3) 



REPRODUCTION DIVISION 

Blueprint & Reproduction Manager(l) 

Sr. Account Clerkd) 

Photo-L I thographer ( I ) 

Photographer ( I ) 

Reproduction Supervi sor ( I ) 

Sr. Offset Mach. Operatord) 

Offset Mach. Operatord) 

Sr. Blueprinting Mach. Operatord) 

Blueprinting Mach. 0perator(2) 



STORES & EQUIPMENT DIVISION 

Stores & Equipment Superv i sor ( I ) 

Asst. Stores & Equipment Superv I sor (I) 

Sr. Clerk Stenographer ( I ) 

Sr. Clerk Typistd ) 

Sr. Storekeeper ( I 2) 

Storekeeper (22) 

Asst. Storekeeper (9) 

Inventory Clerk(2) 




-2- 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

serves all departments of 
the City & County, 
including City-owned 
utl I itles, the San 
Francisco Port 
Commission & the San 
Francisco Community 
Col lege District. 



STORES & EQUIPMENT DIVISION maintains 

& operates a central warehouse & store- 
rooms in various City Departments; 
transfers or disposes of equipment and 
supplies no longer useful to 
departments; maintains a perpetual 
inventory of City equipment including 
al I City vehicles. 



REPRODUCTION DIVISION operates a 

central reproduction facility for all 
departments requiring its 
services. 



CENTRAL SHOPS 

DIVISION repairs 

4 mai ntai ns auto- 
motive & other 
equipment for the 
various departments, 
Community Col lege 
District & for the 
School District. 



BUYING DIVISIONS. PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 

is respons i b I eV DIVISION handles the 

for the procurement Nv clerical & supportive duties of 
of supplies, equipments purchasing, involving the Bid 
services & insurance. N. Section, Accounts Payable 

Coding Section carries X. Section, Payroll Section & 

on the development & N^ the Accounting Section, 
application of the material 
& supplies identification 
coding system. 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT: 

J.C. Gavin - Purchaser of Supplies (Department Head) 

BUYING DIVISION 

R. Tecco - Asst. Director of Purchasing & Services (Division Head) 

G. Burket - Senior Purchaser, Specifications & Standardization 

R. Erickson - Senior Purchaser, Buying Staff 

J. Bres I i n - Senior Purchaser, San Francisco General Hospital 

B. Savant - Acting Senior Purchaser, Municipal Railway 

Vacant - Coding Supervisor 

PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS DIVISION 

A. Gibbons - Chfef Clerk (Division Head) 

L. Le Guennec - Principal Clerk 

STORES & EQUIPMENT DIVISION 

Vacant - Stores & Equipment Supervisor (Division Head) 

H. Gheno - Stores 4 Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

REPRODUCTION DIVISION 

E. Fundis - Blueprint & Reproduction Manager (Division Head) 

CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 

A.M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops (Division Head) 

E.A. Rames - Assistant Superintendent of City Shops 



-3- 



SEPARATIONS! 



RET I RED 



NAME 

Ingmlre, Nata F. 
Clarke, Guy A. 
Puskas, Mike L. 
Brlttan, Wl I I lam J 
Winch, Stanley W. 
Le Blanc, James E. 
Hargas, Joseph 
King, Adolphus Jr. 
Raos, John J . 
Lee, Gertrude M. 
Mc Manls, Helen E. 
Quadras, George M. 



POSITION 

Blueprinting Machine Operator 
Senior Purchaser 
Automotive Service Worker 
Patternworker 
Automotive Machinist 
Automotive Service Worker 
Automotive Machinist 
Automotive Service Worker 
Machi nlst Foreman 
Senior Account Clerk 
Stenographic Secretary 
Automotive Service Worker 



APPROX. YEARS OF CITY SERVI 



12.2 


7-01-76 


26.3 


8-01-76 


20.3 


8-06-76 


25.3 


8-28-76 


8.1 


9-01-76 


30.2 


9-20-76 


17.1 


1-29-77 


16.1 


1 -29-77 


29.6 


2-01-77 


10.4 


2-01-77 


7.0 


4-01-77 


21.5 


5-13-77 



RECAPITULATION OF WORK ACCOMPLISHED: 



DIVISION 



UNIT 



1975-1976 



1976-1977 



Buy! ng 



Purchase Orders 

Do I lar Amount 
Encumbrance Request Amount 
Personal & Professional Service 

Contracts Amount 

TOTAL 



31 ,039 
$29,202,104 
$67,649,000 



26,425 
$31,526,554 
$84,854,016 



$12.076,484 $14.446.950 
11(58,927,588 5 HO, 827,5^0 



Personnel & 
Accounts 



Stores & Equipment 



Bids Processed: 

Price Quotations 

Informal Bids 

Formal Bids 

Term Contracts 
Purchase Order Discounts Earned 
Sale of City Documents 



Surplus Sales Amount 
Warehouses in Operation 
Average Daily Inventory on hand 



6,055 


6,075 


2,526 


2,245 


318 


322 


150 


155 


$86,717 


$76,318 


$1 1 ,436 


$12,164 


$1 13,216 


$162,695 


1 1 


II 


4, 170,774 


$ 3,975,148 



Reproduction 
Central Shops 



Services Rendered Amount 



Job Orders 

Expend I tures 

Gasoline Di spensed (Ga I Ions) 



$212,788 



9,384 

$ 2,430,951 

1,1 18,166 



$236,234 



10,494 

$ 2,594,878 

1,342,209 



BUYING DIVISION 

The Buying Division, under the supervision of the Assistant Director 
of Purchasing and Services, is responsible for the procurement of supplies, 
equipment, services and insurance for all City and County departments and 
the San Francisco Community College District. As requisitions are received 
from the various City and County Agencies they are converted either directly 
to purchase orders, as in the case of term contract items, or to formal or 
Informal bids by the appropiate buyer according to commodity code. Generally, 
the procurement functions (outlined in detail in a previous report) are as 
fol lows: 

I. BUYING - BIDS AND AWARDS 

Evaluation by requisition document to determine type of 
procurement action to be taken; preparation of bids to 
Include contractual and technical requirements; analysis 
and award of bids. 

I I. BUYING - RELATED FUNCTIONS 

Analysis of records of previous purchases specifically 
related to factors of average use; maintenance of Indi- 
vidual specification files and library of pertinent cat- 
alogs and technical data; research on new items; prepar- 
ation of new and review and/or revision of old term con- 
tracts; and procedural review. 

III. INSURANCE 

Pursuant to Charter Section 7.100 and Section 21.4 of the 
Administrative Code, the Purchaser of Supplies contracts 
for the insurance coverage for all the various City and 
County departments, boards and commissions. 

As mentioned In the FY 75-76 report the insurance program 
has qreatly increased in size and complexity over the past 
years due to the expansion and extension of public facil- 
ities and services. Continued deterioration of Insurance 
markets and sharp increases in premium costs, some of which 
have been brouqht about by the legislative and judicial 
action in the field of general tort liability, still plague 
the City. 

The need for a trained and experienced insurance specialist 
for this highly technical procurement is still a high 
priority item. 

We again strongly recommend the creation of a seperate Risk 
Management Bureau, adequately staffed with trained and 
experienced personnel. We believe the benefits and savings 
accruing from such an organization would be highly advan- 
tageous. 

-5- 



BUYING PERSONNEL 

The buying staff consists of the following personnel: 

I - Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 
Robert Tecco 



4 - 



Senior Purchasers 

Raymond F. Ertckson - Buying Staff 

George F. Burket - Specifications and Standardization 

James Brest in - San Francisco General Hospital 

Bernard Savant - San Francisco Municipal Railway 

(position not in salary ordinance until FY 76-77) 



6 - 



Purchasers 

Douglas Goodspeed 

Howard Phelps 

Fel Ix Lahaderne 

George Lowenberg , retired 7-1-77 

Claude Webster , Temporary employee 

Wi I I lam Marble , Temporary employee 



2 - Purchasers (Printing) 
Miriam Kanzel 
(Other position vacant) 



OPERATIONS 



These buyers procure all 
the materials, supplies, 
egulpment, and services 
requested by all the varloui 
departments and agencies In 
the City and County ofS.F. 
This group purchases well 
over 100,000 different Item; 
per year which range from 
simple supplies such as 
pencils to the most complex 
items of equipment. 



1. Purchasing workload Is assigned to the individual buyer on a commodity 
basis with allowance for Items of a special nature or in cases where 
seasonal peaks or vacations make It advisable to deviate from this policy. 
Budget equipment (OE 400 funds) is also spread throughout the buying staff 
to prevent an overload on any particular buyer. 

2. Periodic meetings of the buying staff are held to permit the exchange of 
ideas; the formulation of improved operating procedures; discussions of 
mutual problems; review and refinement of existing procedures; and in 
general to keep the staff apprised of the City-wide purchasing picture. 

3. In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish information 
that will Indicate a standard of overall quality and usefulness suitable 
for actual use requirements, and to permit competitive bidding as required 
by the Charter and Administrative Code. The forms devised for this purpose 
make It easier for departments to furnish desired Information for bid 
purposes. 

4. As time is available, personnel are assigned to: 

a. Review specifications, forms, and procedures. 

b. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services where 



-6- 



deslreable. Term contracts added during the past fiscal year, 
are as fol lows: 

72900 Repair Motorcycles, Har ley/Davidson Police Dept. 

82527 Towel Service City Col leqe 
84600 Towing, Removing, Scrapping Public 

Nuslance Vehicles Public Health 

85610 Service I ng Fire Extinguishers Various Depts. 

5. Whenever practical, term contracts are entered Into for various services 
and commodities that are In general use by several departments or are 
recurrlngly used by a department. The main advantages are elimination of 
the time lag resulting when Individual bids are requested and elimination 
of the cost Involved In Individual bids. Term contracts must be period- 
ically revised and specifications updated. New Items are added as 
required. 



6. Major purchases Included the following; 



Proposa I 
Number 

3*5 

309 
274 
348 
349 
285 

352 
337 
357 
377 
403 
388 
397 
423 
419 
420 
439 
438 
442 
443 
264 
444 
279 
497 
474 
493 
507 
525 
522 



Description 
Department 



Amount 



Moving Hospital Equipment & Furniture; Public Health $53,252.00 

Oven; Public Health 29,924.10 

Roll, Bending Power; Railway 22,648.00 

Cleaning Service Cand lestick; Rec/Park 32,000.00 

Conversion of Movable Stands, Candlestick; Rec/Park 23,670.00 
Furnishing, Installing & Maintaining Electronic 

Access Control Monitoring System; Railway 30,266.00 

Trucks; Various Departments 11,301.91 

Planer, Road; Public Works 105,725.00 

Machines, Sewer C leanl ng; Public Works 75,007.00 

Truck, Eductor; Public Works 49,363.45 

Trucks; Various Departments 24,522.57 
Pedestrlal Signal Equipment; Public Works, Engineering 37,700.00 
Assemblies, Insulated for RR Crossings; PUC-Hetch Hetchy 20,049.00 

Sweepers, Street, Powered; Public Works 102,920.85 

Automobiles; Various Departments 90,431.61 

Trucks; Various Departments 171,129.45 

Tractor, Aerial Ladder; Fire 53,773.00 

Automobiles, Truck; Railway 64,217.29 

MI I ling Machine; Rai Iway 83,105.00 

Shaper, Universal; Railway 41,696.00 

Shop Equipment-LRV; Railway 196,284.00 

Power Brake; Railway 24,460.00 

Car Puller, Truing Mach. Dlsp. System; Railway 314,500.00 

Police Cars; Police 151,636.32 

Blood Gas Analyzer; Public Health 30,071.00 

Tomographic Imaging Device; Public Health, SFGH 50,000.00 

Sign Post and Bracket, Aluminum; Public Works 24,350.00 

Booklet, Prtd., City Col lege Catalog; City Col leqe 31,445.12 

Tractor, Towing; Railway 35,584.00 



-7- 



Proposa I 
Number 



Description 

Department 



Amount 



515 Fork Lift; Ral I way 

541 Hereof loc; Public Works 

527 Transceivers, Radio, Portable; Electricity 

520 Linen; Public Health 

564 Coffee, Roasted, Whole Bean; Public Health 

585 Bags, Polyethylene; Public Works 

547 Fire Engines; Fire 

496 Microfilm Equipment; College 

558 Ambulances; Public Health 

594 Polymer, Anionic; Publ Ic Works 
457 Deliver & Install Study Carrel System; College 
441 Banding Machine; Railway 

609 Pamphlet. Printed, Special Election; Fin. & Rec 
State Con. Typewriters; Downtown Community College Center 

538 Insulated Ass. for Street Car/Trolley Coach Cro 

571 Furniture; College 

595 Chains & Sprockets; Public Works 
604 Coffee; Various Departments 
606 Desks; Col lege 
612 Terminal, Computer; College 
577 Furniture, Office; College 

530 Lease Equipment for Laboratory; Public Health 

624 Furnish and Install Carrels/A. V. Equipment; Col 

621 Desk, Of f ice Machl ne; College 

593 Chairs; College 



S 42,225.00 
27,156.00 
245,913.00 
29,368.60 
36,384.00 
23,474.18 
267,620.60 
23,227.10 
91,758.20 
28,692.50 
33,199.26 
67,733.00 

.-Registrar 23,361.00 
75,194.33 

ss. PUC-HH 24,275.00 
36,471.65 
58,505.60 
40,387.94 
46,573.15 
22,595.00 
333,001.37 
155,490.00 

lege 46,546.00 
36,755.35 
56,745.05 



MUNICIPAL RAILWAY ACTIVITIES 



A Senior Purchaser position was established In 1975 at the Municipal Railway 
to assist In and Improve all aspects of the purchasing function. The Senior Pur- 
chaser Is a coordinator between the Municipal Railway department and the Central 
Purchasing Office, and takes the appropriate steps to expedite and Implement the 
purchase of equipment, supplies, and services. 

During the fiscal year the Regional Transit Association of the Bav Area has 

established several committees, one of which Is the Procurement Committee. The 
major purpose of this committee Is to promote Joint purchasing and open store 
agreements among the several Bay Area Transit Districts. The Purchasing Department 
was instrumental In laying the groundwork for the Initial joint purchasing agree- 
ment for Automotive Filters. Upon the successful award of this contract, similar 
contracts are planned for other essential transit commodities. 

Several major equipment purchases were made during the year, and the move of 
the entire Elton Shops to the new Metro Center and Woods Division was accomplished, 



SAN FRAN C ISCO GENERAL HOSPITAL ACT IV I I TES 

The Senior Purchaser at San Francisco General Hospital supervises, plans, 
coordinates, and directs the purchasing of the Hospital's six million dollar 
budget for equipment, materials, supplies, services, foodstuffs, and repairs. 



! 



During fiscal year 76-77 the role of the Senior Purchaser was most signif- 
icant because of the Hospital's move to the new hospital building. The numerous 
problems inherent in the occupancy of a new building facility continues to 
require considerable time of the Senior Purchaser. It should be noted that the 
position was unfilled for the first six months of the fiscal year due to a 
ret Irement. 

Major purchases included a major lease contract for the Clinical Labora- 
tories, alarm and monitoring systems for the Hospital's security, and a very 
heavy load of medical capital equipment purchases. Considerable monetary savings 
were realized by a different approach to purchasing Clinical Laboratory forms. 

Of major significance to the present and future operations of the Hospital's 
purchasing program was the creation and organization of a new "Product Evaluation 
Committee" which is composed of key medical and nursing staff personnel. This 
committee functions in part as the technical advisory board for the Senior 
Purchaser in pre-bid specification development and post-bid product evaluations 
and Its future development will be the key to the continued improvement of 
purchasing and material management at San Francisco General Hospital Medical 
Center. 

CONCLUSION 

With the loss of 2 buyer positions to the San Francisco Unified School District 
(SFUSD) at the end of the 75-76 fiscal year, and the inherent problems connected 
with schools purchasing, it was felt that there would be a significant reduction In 
the workload on the remaining staff for FY76-77, but this did hot occur. 

Although 20$ of the buying staff was transferred to SFUSD operations, their 
loss actually resulted in only a I 2h% decrease in the number of purchase orders pro- 
cessed. This coupled with the fact that two buying positions were unfilled during 
six months of the year caused an almost intolerable situation to exist. The burden 
on each buyer amounted to purchases in excess of ten million dollars ($10,000,000), 
a figure several times the per buyer volume of any comparable public purchasing 
staff In the state. 

Another problem of considerable importance has been the lack of stability in 
the buying staff for the past several years. This is primarily attributable to the 
poor response from qualified applicants to the job announcements for the entrance 
class of 1952 Purchaser . For example, the current certified list of only five names 
consisted of one fully qualified applicant, two with marginal qualifications, and two, 
who on entrance Interview, proved to have little or no actual purchasing experience. 

Failure to obtain qualified applicants has been attributable to: 

a. Comparatively low pay in comparison to jurisdictions of simular size, 

b. The tremendous workload per buyer, 

c. Poor fringe benefits In comparison to other public jurisdictions, 

d. Requirement to start under a new retirement plan, and 

e. Restrictions on residence. 

With current staffing the coming fiscal year appears to be a repeat of the last 
but as has been the case In past years a few dedicated people will have to carry the 
burden. 

-9- 



PURCHASE ORDERS 

ENCUMBRANCE REQUESTS 

PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTS 



$100,000,000 
95,000,000 
90,000,000 
85,000,000 
80,000,000 
75,000,000 
70,000,000 
65,000,000 
60,000,000 
55,000,000 
50,000,000 
45,000,000 
40,000,000 
35,000,000 
30,000,000 
25,000,000 
20,000,000 
15,000,000 
10,000,000 
5,000,000 




1972-1973 



1973-1974 



1974-1975 



1975-1976 1976-1977 



PURCHASE 


ORDERS: 




ENCUMBRANCE REQUESTS: 


Year 


Number 


Dol lar Amount 


Year 
1976-77 


Dol lar Amount 


1976-77 


26,425 


$31,526,554 


$84,854,016 


1975-76 


31,039 


29,202,104 


1975-76 


67,649,000 


1974-75 


32,969 


32,992,494 


1974-75 


74,841,892 


1973-74 


35,681 


33,134,213 


1973-74 


53,824,213 


1972-73 


35,302 


27,634,550 


1972-73 


49,261,958 



•Decrease In number of Purchase Orders issued is attributable to Purchasing Dept. 
efforts to reduce same by combining requisitions, requesting departments to order 
optimum quantities, increasing the revolving fund purchase limit, and other pro- 
cedures that have resulted in decreased costs and Increased efficiencies. 



PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL 
SERVICE CONTRACTS: 



Year 



Dol lar Amount 



1976-77 $14,446,950 

1975-76 12,076,484 

1974-75 3,000,000 (est.) 

1973-74 2,518,652 

1972-73 1,061,552 



COMBINED TOTAL OF PURCHASE ORDERS, 
ENCUMBRANCE REQUESTS & SERVICE CONTRACTS: 



Year 



1976-77 
1975-76 
1974-75 
1973-74 
1972-73 



Dol lar Amount 



$130,827,520 

108,927,588 

I 10,834,386 

89,477,078 

77,958,060 



10- 



PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED; 



GENERAL 



Year Number 



1976-77 13,012 

1975-76* 12,430 

1974-75 13,431 

1973-74 14,453 

1972-73 15,014 



Dol lar Amount 



$14,026,630 
12,539,423 
14,069,190 
13,846,231 
12,103,524 



EDUCAT I ON 



Year Number 



1976-77 2,459 

1975-76* 7,558 

1974-75 8,018 

1973-74 9,663 

1972-73 9,326 



Dol lar Amount 



$2,791,339 
5,303,784 
6,029,496 
7,075,882 
5,341,317 



HEALTH 



Year Number 



1976-77 5,715 

1975-76* 5,325 

1974-75 5,537 

1973-74 5,631 

1972-73 5,325 



Dol lar Amount 



$7,905,781 
5,590,383 
6,347,948 
5,270,191 
4,788,134 



UTILITIES 



Year Number 



1976-77 5,239 

1975-76* 5,726 

1974-75 5,983 

1973-74 5,934 

1972-73 5,627 



Dol lar Amount 



$6,802,804 
5,768,514 
6,545,860 
6,941,909 
5,401,575 



COMBINED TOTAL 



Year Number 



Do I lar Amount 



1976-77 26,425 

1975-76* 31,039 

1974-75 32,969 

1973-74 35,681 

1972-73 35,302 



$31,526,554 
29,202, 104 
32,992,494 
33,134,213 
27,634,550 



* Af- i I 1976 - Separation of San Francisco unitied School District purchasing function 



CODING SECTION: 

The Coding Section commenced operations in October, 1962. It was established 
to furnish the City and County of San Francisco with statistical data about com- 
modities procured by the Purchasing Department for the various City departments 
and to create a uniform code in all departments for ordering and Inventory. The 
goals of the coding system were to achieve the following: 

1. computerized inventory control, 

2. standardization of material & supplies, 

3. budgetary information, 

4. selection of effective ordering quantities, 

5. Information for Interdepartmental transfers of surplus commodities, 

6. reduction in inventory requirements. 

A nine-digit commodity coding system was set up using standard nomenclature 
In general accordance with the guidelines of the Federal Supply Catalog. An 
example of a commodity code follows: 

3 75 21 2105 EA Punch, two-hole, 2 3/4 In. span 

3 the object of expenditure (O.E.), 3 designates Material & 

Supplies, a 4 would be used If the Item was equipment; 

75 represents the group number for Office Supplies & Devices; 

21 — -indicates the class number for Office Devices & Accessories, 
Section #2, P to 2 inclusive; 

2105 specifies the Item identification number for the description 

of Punch, two-hole, 2 3/4 In. span; 
EA— Is the approved unit abbreviation for Each. 

61 groups and 575 classes were cataloged with a code book for each group. A 
Cataloging Handbook and a Codification Index were printed to aid the depart- 
ments In writing requisitions for a purchase order. The booklets contained 
Instructions on how to use the codes, a breakdown of the approved unit abbrevia- 
tions, the Index of materials and supplies to proper group and class, plus a 
catagorical listing of all the groups and classes. Publication thereof was for 
the purpose of supplying Information to all departments so that the application 
and use of standard articles could be adopted throughout City and County govern- 
ment. 

During fiscal year 1976-1977 this section was maintained at an operational 
level with all requisitions for purchase orders examined for correctness In 
structure, checked for coding and required procedures and distributed to the 
buyers. Contact with the departments were made when discrepancies were found. This 
resulted in considerable savings to the City in money, materials and supplies, 
delivery time and follow-up correspondence. Another continual project of the 
Coding Section was updating the stock control system of the Municipal Railway and 
San Francisco General Hospital, providing essential coding data to these depart- 
ments and all other departments as requested. 

On the following page the bar graph shows the number of new codes assigned 
the past five years. 



12- 



Codes assigned 1962-1972 6,051 

Bar graph 1972-1977 5.681 

Total I 1 ,732 

This total brings to date over 90,000 commodities that are coded and stocked 
In the Purchasing Department warehouse and storerooms. With the vast number of 
changes and the number of new codes assigned there is a definite need for an up- 
dated printing of the code catalogs, index and a new Instruction manual In the 
handbook, and funds will be requested for this purpose in the forthcoming budget. 

NEW COMMODITY CODES ASSIGNED 



2,000 
1,800 
























1,600 




1657 




1,400 

1,200 

1,000 

800 

600 




1456 














1367 












644 




400 
200 




557 





1972-1973 



1973-1974 1974-1975 1975-1976 1976-1977 



To reach full potential, the coding system must be fully incorporated into 
the City's EDP system so that the information could provide: 

1. CONTROL: in the areas of expenditures and Inventory, valuable 
data and statistics for budgeting plus personnel savings; 

2. PERFORMANCE: increased efficiency in handling orders, rapid 
succession in processing requisitions to vendors and all 
departments, needed Information and data for term contracts; 
and 

3. STANDARDIZATION: further reductions In the kinds and types of 
Items ordered, in order to obtain higher quantity discounts. 



-13- 



PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS DIVISION 

Purchasing Department's Personnel and Accounts Division handles the clerical 
and supportive duties Involved In the purchasing function. 

Bid Section: 



This section Is responsible for typing and mailing all formal and informal 
bids, price quotations, term contracts and the awards as directed by the Buying 
Division. 



Bids Processed 
Price Quotations 
Informal Bids 
Formal Bids 
Term Contracts 



1975-1976 

67o3T 

2,526 
318 
150 



1976-1977 

6^75" 

2,245 
322 
155 



The section also handles the clerical aspect of the traveling regulsltions to 
purchase orders (month I y repetitive orders processed In guantlty on a repeat basis); 
tabulation of bids (microfilmed record of all bids); extentions and additions checked 
on the requisitions, plus calculation of sales tax then assignment of the purchase 
order numbers. After the assignment of the purchase order number the order ts 
xeroxed with seven (7) documents resulting: Vendor's copy-white, Controller's copy- 
blue, Purchasing's copy-green, Material Received Report-yellow & two white copies 
for the department, plus the Advance copy-orange for the department. The section 
also maintains the requisition register, vendor register and the purchase order 
register; handles departmental pay check distribution; and the sale of various city 
documents. 

SALE OF CHARTERS, CODES & OTHER DOCUMENTS 



$30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 



$16,946 



$18,785 



$16,610 



$11,436 $12,164 



1 972- 1 m 1975-1974 1574-1975 1975-1976 1 976"- 1977 



Payrol 



I Section: 



The payroll section posts time report information to timerolls including 
information of time worked, vacations, leaves, overtime and similar information 
reflecting employee activities during a pay period. This section also provides 
information to employees and others on employment processes, leave problems, 
salaries and wages plus any other requests for information regarding departmental 
personnel and payroll activities. 

Accountinq Section: 



This section gathers data relative to the preparation of the Purchasing 
Department budget; maintains the posting of expenditures and control of the 
accounts and prepares reports for these accounts; compiles financial reports and 
tax statements; approves departmental receipts for deposit with the City Treasurer; 
plus varied accounting duties. 



-14- 



Accounts Payable Section; 

Purchase orders are processed for payment after receipt of the MRR(Materlal 
Received Report) from the department. The amount is verified with the Invoices and 
packing slips received, then sent to the Controller for payment. The date Is 
posted In the Purchase Order Register when the order is sent to the Controller's 
Office for payment or when a Purchase Order is cancelled. 

With the implementation of the Vendor Code by the Controller's Office, It Is 
hoped that the payments of purchase orders can be completed more rapidly. 

The number of purchase orders to be prepared and processed Is not constant, 
chiefly due to the fact that the requisitions do not flow Into the department 
uniformly. Consequently, there are times when high production cannot be sustained 
because of diminished personnel caused by vacation, illness, unfilled positions or 
other conditions beyond Purchasing's control. However, continual effort Is made to 
process the requisitions and the subsequent purchase orders with upmost speed, 
accuracy and efficiency. 

DISCOUNTS EARNED 



$140,000 
120,000 
100,000 
80,000 
60,000 
40,000 
20,000 



$107,889 



76..3I8 



1972-1973 1973-1974 1974-1975 1975-1976 1976-1977 



Discounts 


Taken 




ui scounTs 


LOST 




Month 


1975-1976 


1976-1977 


Month 


1975-1976 


1976-1977 


July 


$ 6,476.36 


$ 7,090.21 


July 


$ 802.77 


$ 46.26 


August 


9,378.24 


6,017.88 


August 


222.86 


498.48 


September 


6,522.27 


4,784.01 


September 


669.85 


422.21 


October 


9,809.51 


4,776.39 


October 


1,672.35 


472.17 


November 


6,188.87 


6,123.49 


November 


755.52 


304.34 


December 


4,835.04 


2,546.30 


December 


1 16.64 


98.23 


January 


14,649.41 


10,130.44 


January 


99.02 


252.35 


February 


7,762.66 


6,237.22 


February 


673.00 


124.21 


March 


6,288.37 


5,137.07 


March 


69.21 


152.13 


Apri 1 


6,194.01* 


4,713.36 


Apr! 1 


« 


975.36 


May 


2,785.88 


9,358.10 


May 


— 


1,486.53 


June 


5,826.19 


9,403.38 


June 


22.17 


2,102.88 




$86,716.81 


$76,317.85 




$5', 103.39 


S6,»5.I5 



* Separation of San Francisco Unified School District purchasing function, 



-15- 



Purchaser of Suppl les] STORES AND EQUIPMENT DIVISION 

Stores & Equpment Supervisor! (unfilled) (52 employees) 



Asst. Stores & Equip. Spvr.j 



Inventory Section, Stores Section, Sales Section 

Sr. Clerk Stenographer 

Sr. Clerk Typist 

Sr. Storekeeper (12-3 unfilled) 

Storekeeper (22-2 unfilled) 

Asst. Storekeeper (9) 

Asst. Storekeeper (3-CETA, Temporary) 

Inventory Clerk (2) 



The Purchasing Department's Stores & Equipment Division operates and maintains 
a central warehouse and several storerooms In various City departments. These units 
are responsible for the following processes: 

1. receive, store & Issue materials, supplies & equipment for City 
& County Departments; 

2. handle the sale of surplus & obsolete city property; 

3. handle the equipment exchanges between departments; and 

4. maintain a perpetual inventory of a I I items in stock. 

Moreover, this division Is responsible for the registering and insuring of the 
City vehicles as well as reporting all accidents and ordering plus distributing 
gasoline credit cards. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the Stores and Equipment 
Division: 



DEPARTMENT 
Purchasing 



Pub I ic Health 
Munlclpa I Rai I way 

Water 

S.F. Intl. Airport 
Pub I ic Works 
E lectr lei ty 
Recreation & Park 
Sheriff 



LOCATION 

Central Warehouse- 

15th & Harrison St. 

Centra I Shops- 

800 Quint St. 

S.F.G.H.-22nd & Potrero 

L.H.H.-7th & Dewey Blvd. 

24th & Utah St. and 

2 sub-stores 

17th & Potrero and 

I sub-store 

Geneva & San Jose Ave. 

1990 Newcomb 

Hetch Hetchy-Moccasl n 

South San Francisco 

2323 Army St. 

901 Rankin St. 

Golden Gate Park 

Rm. 331, City Hal I 

Jai I #\, n 



TYPE 


INVENTORY AMOUNT 


Stationery 


5 15,345.55 


Jani tor ial 


8,734.04 


Genera 1 


42,344.65 


General 


431,357.44 


Genera 1 


452,988.80 


General 


643,624.89 


Genera 1 


434,985.89 


General 


379,912.36 


General 


626,014.05 


Genera 1 


60,751.95 


General 


77,677.92 


Genera 1 


226,722.65 


General 


59,903.81 


Genera 1 


52,383.39 


General 


464,400.46 


TOTAL 


$ 3,975,147.65 



-16- 



INVENTORY SECTION 

This section controls the Equipment Inventory for all City Departments. As new 
equipment Is purchased It Is recorded and the necessary papers are forwarded to the 
department. If an equipment Item Is lost, damaged or stolen, this section Is notified, 
a follow-up Investigation is made and a report Is sent to the Board of Supervisors. 
Periodic checks of each department's equipment should be made In order to update the 
perpetual Inventory records with surplus furniture and equipment made available to 
other City departments by departmental transfer; however, this service has not been 
performed for the past several years due to lack of personnel. 

When the operation of a City Department requires an office relocation the 
Inventory section estimates the cost of the move or secures an estimate from a moving 
contractor, follows through, sets the date with the moving contractor and the depart- 
ment and In some cases supplies the necessary materials required for the move. This 
section assisted In 64 relocations during the fiscal year. 

The Inventory Section along with the Sales Section arranges for the recurring 
disposal of various waste materials by sale, eg. tabulating cards, waste paper, 
X-ray film, drain oil, sacks and containers, miscellaneous scrap metal, and for the 
sale and disposal of surplus city vehicles and equipment. 

During the fiscal year due to the shortage of personnel at the Central Warehouse 
Stores Section, this section assisted in the preparation of stationery orders and 
handled all the deliveries of stationery to various departments. The new San Francis- 
co General Hospital Storeroom facility was organized by the resident Senior Store- 
keeper, Charles Ryan and has become a model warehouse facility. 



-17- 



STORES SECTION 

The 1976-1977 fiscal year has been a very difficult one. Nine (9) employees 
have retired or resigned. Vacancies this year, as last year, have created a crisis 
situation as the following positions are unfilled as of June 30, 1977: 

1 Stores & Egulpment Supervisor 
3 Senior Storekeepers 

2 Storekeepers 

The Inability to obtain replacements for these positions, combined with vaca- 
tions and sick leaves forced the closing of storerooms for periods of time, thereby 
seriously affecting the efficiency of the departments which this section served. 

Several employees were awarded certificates issued by the San Francisco 
Community College District as a result of their successful completion of a course In 
Mater lets Management. We are grateful to two of the District's personnel, Mr. Farhad 
Samll, Associate Director, Pacific Heights Community College Center, who planned and 
coordinated the training and to Mr. Joseph Mannon who conducted the course. 

The employees who received the certificates were: 

Ramon Armado Louise Muhbz 

Richard Fagan David Wood 
Eugene Yokley 

The new storeroom at MUNI METRO RAIL CENTER, 2200 San Jose Avenue, was opened In 
June, 1977 with another new storeroom still under construction at the Municipal Rail- 
way Woods Section. Completion date for this latest storeroom is expected to be In 
late 1977. 



-18- 



SALES SECTION 

From July I, 1976 through June 30, 1977 thirteen (13) sales were conducted by 
this sales section and the Purchasing Department under the authority of Section 7.100 
of the City Charter. For the sales, the Items are listed and catagorlzed; then the 
sales are advertised, bids accepted and awarded and then receipts are sent to the 
City Treasurer. Records and correspondence relative to the sale are compiled by this 
section and recorded with the Purchasing Department. 

A general breakdown of the sales for the fiscal year 1976-1977 follows: 

DESCRIPTION AMOUNT OF SALE 



Drain and Waste Oi I 

Sacks and Crates 

Grease and Bones 

Waste Paper 

City Directories 

Trol ley Coaches 

Scrap Meta I 

Fire Hose, Surplus 

Vehicles 

Cable Car Cable 

Recorders 

Batteries, Surplus 



908 

74 

3,320 

10,032 

383 

109,382 

13,718 

2,255 

14,465 

2,025 

63 

6,070 



TOTAL 



$ 162,695 



SALES OF SURPLUS CITY EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES 



$2, 100, ( 

2,000,1 

1,900,1 

1,800,1 

1,700,1 

l,600,( 

1,500,1 

1,400,1 

l,300,( 

1,200,1 

1,100,1 

1,000,1 

900,1 

800,1 

700,1 

600,1 

500,1 

400, ( 

300, ( 

200, ( 

100,1 



000 
















000 






$2,028,099 




000 






(includes a sale of computers 




000 






for $1,976,270) 




000 










000 










000 










000 










000 










000 








000 










000 










000 










000 










000 










000 










000 










000 






$241,255 




000 


$54,167 








$162,695 


000 


$1 13,216 








_ _ _ 








000 


r 






1 I 





1972-1973 



1973-1974 1974-1975 1975-1976 1976-1977 

-19- 



REPRODUCTION DIVISION 

The Reproduction Division provides centralized service to City Departments for 
photography, offset printing (up to 17 In. by 22 In.), ammonia printing (for archi- 
tectural drawings), photostats (up to 18 in. by 24 In.), microfilming and self- 
service copiers. Funds to operate the Division are provided by Interdepartmental 
Work Orders. 

Mrs. Gertrude Lee, Sr. Account Clerk, retired after 10 years of service. She is 
greatly missed by all who know her. However, we were fortunate to have a guick 
replacement, Mr. Peter Simon has proven very competent. 

REPRODUCTION: CHARGES FOR SERVICES 



1976-1977 
1975-1976 
1974-1975 
1973-1974 
1972-1973 




$100,000 $150,000 $200,000 $250,000 $300,000 $350,000 



In February, 1976 an A.B. Dick 150 camera-platemaker with on-line sorter was 
Installed, replacing an 805 platemaker. The 150, after Installation and adjustment has 
proven fast and flexible. Its ease of operation was felt especially during the budgrt 
reproduction. In addition to the camera-platemaker, a second 369 automated offset 
press was also Installed. With an Increase In the number and length plus Increased 
report volume, It seems Invaluable. This increase In paper used amounted to 1 5/6 over 
last fiscal year, from 7.3 million sheets to 8.6 million sheets. 



-20- 



CENTRAL SHOPS - ANNUAL REPORT 
1976 - 1977 

INTRODUCTION 



Fire Apparatus Shop 
Electric Shop 
Pattern Shop 
Blacksmith Shop 
Paint Shop 
Upholstery Shop 

Truck & Heavy Equipment Shop 
Army St, D.P.W. Station 
19th Ave, D.P.W. Station 
Quint St. Station 
Tire Shop 

Auto S Light Truck Shop 

Machine Shop 

Recreation S Park Shop 

H all of Justice Service Station 

Conclusion 

Financial Statements & Charts 



-21 



CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 

Section 7.100 of the Charter of the City and County of San Francisco 
provides that the Purchaser of Supplies shall have charge of a central 
garage and shop for the repair of City and County equipment. 

In compliance the Central Shops and allied facilities provide all 
necessary mechanical maintenance and repair service for all City depart- 
ments and divisions (exception, Public Utilities). In addition, it Is 
the responsibility of this Division to Inspect, appraise and make recom- 
mendations on all City-owned vehicles contemplated for replacement and to 
aid the various departments in the writing of specifications; to receive 
and approve all new vehicles delivered to the City, and to outfit and 
prepare these vehicles for service. 

Other Central Shops operations include Golden Gate Park Shop, providing 
maintenance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; Hall of Justice 
Service Station, where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police and 
other City cars, along with inspection and light maintenance for Police 
vehicles; Department of Public Works, Army Street Yard, where fuels, 
lubricants, preventive maintenance and Inspection are provided for Public 
Works vehicles; 19th Avenue Public Works Station; Health Department Garage; 
and Department of Electricity Garage. 

Administration of the Shops, under the Purchaser of Supplies, Is the 
direct responsibility of Mr. Albert M. Flaherty, General Superintendent, 
aided by Mr. Edmond A. Rames, City Shops Assistant Superintendent. 

The Central Shops, Quint Street operation, has four main maintenance shop 
areas. They are (I.) Automobile, (2.) Truck and Heavy Equipment, (3.) 
Fire Apparatus, (4.) Machine; and the following auxiliary shops: 
Blacksmith, Pattern and Ladder Shop, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body and 
Fender, Tire, Service Station. 

Along with the responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of mechanical 
equipment in school buildings, sewage plants, pumping stations, public 
buildings, etc., the Shops maintain 2,904 units of the City-owned automotive 
fleet. Th?se vehicles and machines are valued at approximately 10.5 
mi I I ion dol I ars . 

Tne Division is budgeted for 101 employees. Of these, 83 are funded I nter- 
departmental ly in the 312 budget while 18 are funded directly or through 
transfer in the 311 budget. 



-22- 



FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 

The Fire Apparatus Shop combined with five sub-shops, namely the Ladder 
Shop, Paint Shop, Electric Shop, Blacksmith and 3ody Shop, and Upholstery 
Shop, maintain all fire-fighting equipment. 

This Shop is staffed with nine Automotive Machinists, two Metal smiths, two 
Painters, one Body and Fender Worker, one Upholsterer, one Chauffeur 
(Truck Driver) and one Automotive Serviceman. 

Retirements reduced this staff by five (5) craftsmen for the greater part 
of the fiscal year. 

Shop supervision consists of one Auto Machinist Foreman, Ray Monti, and 
one Auto Machinist Sub-Foreman, Dino Rugger i . 

The Fire Shop and its sub-shops completed 2,633 job orders during the year 
and responded to and made 1,684 repairs and services to fire apparatus at 
their stations and in the streets. 

Included in the total of jobs on Fire Apparatus were: 

2 Detroit Diesel Engine overhauls 
6 major engine overhauls (gas) 

113 minor engine repairs - head gaskets, tune-ups, valve grinds, 
water pumps, etc. 

167 fire pump repairs, — leaking gates, gauges, pump packings, 
water plumbing leaks, pressure, capacity change- 
over valves, hose reels and fittings. 

I major fire pump overhaul 

8 standard 5-speed transmission overhauls 

I HT73 Allisson automatic transmission 
16 clutch replacements 

206 brake repairs — reline, air leaks, spring brake replacement, 

air compressors , misc. air valves, quick release, 

etc. 
88 100-foot aerial repairs, ladder locks, bent rungs, cables, 

pulleys, hydraulic pumps, hydraulic leaks, gauges, 

etc. 

3 squirt repairs - hydraulic failures 

II 500-gal Ion water tanks -- sandblast, weld and coat with rust- 

resistant epoxy 
3 differential overhauls 
I I broken axles 
243 lube and service jobs performed by our Automotive Service Man. 

The Fire Apparatus Snop, along with routine maintenance and repai r, prepared 
for service I Seagrave Aerial and 4 American La France Pumpers. 

The following conversions were made: 

From a 1970 International Surplus Ambulance to a Ut I I i ty Uni t . On 
this truck we installed a two-stage hydraulic pump unit. With this 
hydraulic unit are operated 2 heavy-duty jackhammers, I hydraulic 
chain saw, I hydraulic cement or metal cutting saw, I trash pump 
(used for evacuating water-flooded basements). 

-23- 



Other equipment carried by this emergency unit are cement-cutting drills 
capable of drilling a 6-Inch diameter hole through 7 inches of concrete, 
used for gaining access to lower floors or sub-basement fires; salvage 
covers, a 3000 KW portable electric generator, and a gas-operated 
portable water pump. 

Other conversions were from a salvage company to a rescue squad, and 
from a rescue squad to a pollution control unit. 

Three major accidents were repaired by this Shop. One was a pumper 
which was lilt broadside by a van, and two 100-ft. aerial trucks damaged 
while responding to major alarms. On all three as estimated by outside 
contractors, this Shop was able to save the City thousands of dollars, 
due to Shop experience in working on fire apparatus. 

One of our most interesting challenges was the designing and engineering 
of spring saddles for 16 of our fire apparatus. This became necessary when 
the'U-bolts failed, the rear springs came apart, and the rear axle 
rotated downward along with shifting into the wheel housing. After 
consultation with factory representatives, it was determined that the 
cause was improper design. Since 16 units were involved, the Central Shops 
submitted to the manufacturer drawings of the proposed modi f icat ions, which 
they approved. Our Pattern Shop made the patterns and had castings made 
and our machinists machined them. The City was reimbursed for the cost 
on modifications for 16 units by the manufacturer. 

ELECTRIC SHOP 

A total of 346 jobs was completed in this shop. 

The Electric Shop does the repairing of alternators, regulators, 
sirens, starters, generators, portable electric power plants, 
extension cords, portable lamps, high intensity flood lamps, water 
pumps*, water vacs, chain saws, cement-cutting saws, metal -cutting 
saws, electric drills battery changes and maintenance, etc. Also 
included for the Electric Shop is the maintenance of lights and 
wiring of fire apparatus, along with the installation of red 
lights, sirens, air horn buttons on new equipment prior to placing 
them in service. 

PATTERN & LADDER SHOP 

This shop is staffed with I Patternmaker. He is responsible for 

the inspection, repair, and replacement of all metal and wood 
ladders used by the Fire Department. During the year, 3 new fire 

escape ladders were built and the construction of four 35-foot 
ladders was completed. The repairs and refinishing of 47 damaged 
ladders were completed and the ladders returned to service. 

Also manufactured in this shop are chock blocks, assorted blocks 
for truck companies, tool boxes, Gleason saddles, sprinkler head 
wedges, various patterns, etc. Included are patterns for the high 
pressure system, Dept.of Electricity, Water Department, etc. 

SLACKS' 1 1 TH SHOP 

This shop is staffed with 2 Metal smiths. Work performed in this 

shop is the manufacturing of new small tools, repairs to damaged 

-24- 



tools, sharpening and re-handling of axes and sledges, as well 
as repair to 500-gal Ion water tanks. 

They also repaired fire apparatus bumpers, metal fire ladder 
rungs ( straightened or replaced), aerial ladder jacks; and 
welded worn hydrant stems and fire hydrant related parts. All 
welding for the machine shop which services the high pressure 
system, sewage plants, schools, truck shop, and police shop is 
done by th i s plant. 

PAINT SHOP 

This shop is staffed with 4 painters. All the accident and non- 
accident paint work for the Police Department, Department of 
Public Works, Fire Department , and miscellaneous Department vehicles 
is done In th i s shop . 

Included in the work they perform is the up-dating of fire apparatus 
to white cab tops, the painting of items made by the Pattern Shop 
and the olacksmith Shop, some of which are: chock blocks, hose 
Dumpers, Gleason saddles, miscellaneous hose, fitting pegs, brackets 
of all types, wood and metal compt boxes - sub-assemblies of engine 
parts, transmissions, differentials, etc. They install Police, 
Sheriff, and Fire Department seals, stars and vehicle numbers. Paint 
fire apparatus water tanks, refinish ladders, gold leaf trim and 
I etter i ng . 

During the year the following jobs were completed by the Paint Shop: 

37 complete Police and department auto paint jobs 
241 partial Police and miscellaneous department auto paint jobs 
3 complete DPW trucks 
27 partial DPW trucks 
5 complete high pressure trucks 
92 partial fire apparatus 

76 ladders - scraped, sanded, oiled and varnished 
10 water tanks (rust-resi sfant epoxy) 

106 miscellaneous chassis minor work — wheels, axles, springs, 
brake chambers, driver lines, etc. 

UPHOL STERY SHOP 

Staffed by one Upholsterer. This shop does all the rebuilding and 
covering of scats for Hie Fire Department, Police Department , and 
Department of Public Works. Some of the work performed in this 
shop is the repair and making of new salvage covers, Hypalon 
hose, bed covers, leather truckmen's belts, ladder straps, firemen's 
safety belts, rubber gaskefs, leather radio boxes, various tool 
and equipment covers, helmet straps, leather axe tips, hose butt 
shields, etc. 



-25- 



TRUCK AND HEAVY EQUIPMENT SHOP 

The heavy-duty truck Shop is supervised by foreman Arthur Chin, assisted 
by II Automotive Machinists, 2 Automotive Servicemen and I Metalsmlth. 
Also under the direction of the Truck Shop are 4 sub-shops, as follows: 

ARMY ST . SERV I CE STAT I ON 

Day Shift - Staffed by I Automotive Machinist and I Auto Serviceman, 
Dispenses gas and oil. Minor automotive repairs, lube and oil 
service to 680 D.P.W. units. 

Swing Shift - Staffed by I Automotive Machinist Subforeman, I 
Automotive Machinist, and 3 Auto Servicemen. Minor automotive 
repairs, street cleaning, sweeper maintenance and light repairs. 
Dispenses gas, oil and vehicle services. 

Combined Day and Night Shifts : 

Pieces of equipment serviced 696 

Miscellaneous repairs 2515 

Units routed to shops for repal r 131 

Road cal Is 93 

Gallons of gasoline dispensed 265,324 

Gallons of o'esel fuel dispensed 5,823 

Gallons of lube oil dispensed 2,001 
Service and inspect mechanical 

street sweepers 79 
Repair and adjust mechanical 

street sweepers 145 

19th AVE. SERVICE STATION 

Dispenses gas and oil. Lubrication and service. Staffed by I Auto 

Serviceman. 

QUINT STREET SERV ICE STATION 

Dl spenses gas and olT. Lubrication and service. Staffed by I 

Auto Serviceman. 

QUINT STREET TIRE SHOP 

Repai r and change "ti res, service calls. Staffed by 2 Automotive 

Servicemen. 

The Truck Shop is responsible for the service, maintenance and repair of 
353 heavy -duty vehicles and equipment units of various City departments, 
consi sting of : 

Dump Trucks Street Fl ushers 

Tool Heaters Sewer Eductors 

Asphalt Spreader High Pressure Sewer Fl ushers 

Asphalt Paver Mud Pumps 

Mobile Cranes Sewer Bucket Tuggers 

Concrete Saws Tree Topper 

Air Compressors Tree Chipper 

Scoopnobi I es Vans 

Road Grader Buses 



Caterpillar Tractor Boom Trucks 

Garbage Compactors Ambulances 

Front End Loaders Asphalt Rollers 
Mobile Street Sweepers. 



During the 1976-77 fiscal year 1,969 job orders were written and 
processed, as follows: 

10 complete engine overhauls 

156 minor engine repairs 

15 valve grinds 

72 complete brake overhauls 

372 minor brake repairs 

104 complete clutch overhauls 

172 minor clutch repairs 

149 generator/alternator overhauls 

.'48 minor charging system repairs 

151 starter overhauls 

189 complete engine tune-ups 

223 road service calls 

178 tows 

12 accident repairs 

MO battery replacements 

198 blacksmith jobs 

24 hydraulic hoist repairs 

8 automatic transmission repairs 

12 manual transmission overhauls. 



AUTO & LIGHT TRUCK SHOP 

This shop is staffed with six permanent Automotive Mechanics and four 
temporary Automotive Mechanics, two permanent Body and Fender Workers and 
one permanent Auto Painter, also two Automotive Servicemen, under the 
supervision of Ed Franke. 

The Automobile Shop is responsible for the maintenance and repair of 
1,144 automobiles, light trucks and motorcycles. 

Total number of repair jobs completed this year was 3,287. In addition, 
151 new/replacement vehicles were outfitted for service. 

A listing of completed jobs shows: 

580 engine tuneups with our >un electronic engine tester and our 

■•'arquette exhaust emission analyzer 
977 brake jobs, including inspection and replacement as needed of 

the hydraulic system and drums turned on our Ammco drum 

lathe 
136 automatic transmissions removed and completely overhauled 
78 " " serviced and adjusted to factory specifications 

i n the veh icle 
173 radiators repaired 
37 engine valve grinds with tuneups 

44 standard transmission and clutch replacements 

-27- 



23 engine overhauls with Inspection and repair of all accessories 
251 road service calls, Including minor repairs or towing to City 

shop for major work 
1,013 miscellaneous repair jobs completed for various departments. 

Major projects for the year were the outfitting of 25 Black and White 
Patrol units, and conversion of 13 undercover vehicles to the new Blue 
and White Patrol units for the Police Ueparment. The Sheriff's Department 
received eight vehicles, three of which were outfitted with security 
screens and hidden rear door locks, roof lights and sirens. Five new 
vehicles were completely outfitted for the Fire Department. 105 vehicles 
were inspected and serviced before being assigned to various departments. 

Accident repairs numbered 241 for the year. Vehicles damaged by accident 
were repaired at low cost by using necessary parts from vehicles turned 
In for replacement. 

MACHINE SHOP 

At present, the Machine Shop is staffed with 10 Maintenance Machinists, 

9 permanent, I temporary. John Raos, Foreman, retired on January 4, 1977. 

L.A.Gavig I io, Maintenance Machinist, served as temporary Foreman. 

During the fiscal year 1976-1977, the Machine Shop performed a total of 
730 jobs. 

The public school system requires the services of the Machine Shop to 
maintain and repair boiler room equipment such as vacuum and hot water 
circulating pumps, heat blower fans to maintain the normal heating tempera- 
ture of the classrooms, etc. Numerous other jobs are also performed, — 
e.g. the repair of window and gymnasium folding door mechanisms. 

The Machine Shop maintains and repairs all machinery, power and hand tools 
of the Industrial Arts Section. These comprise the machine, woodworking, 
sheet metal and printing shops. 

The Machine Shop mai ntai ns - repai rs boiler room equipment required to heat 
and ventilate the buildings of the San Francisco Community College. This 
includes buildings on other campuses throughout the City. Besides repairing 
the various vacuums, circulating pumps and fans, the Maintenance Machinist 
constructed a new hot water return tank in the Cloud Hall boiler room. 
Repairs were also made to other apparatus such as bleachers and weight- 
I i ft ing equi pment . 

The three main sewage treatment plants require the services of 4 Maintenance 
Machinists on a permanent basis. They maintain and repair various equipment 
necessary for a 24-hour operation of these vital plants. I man each is 
stationed at the North Point and Richmond-Sunset plants. 2 are 
stationed at the Southeast operation. The jobs are: maintaining machinery 
of the bar rakes (8); sedimentation tank drives, i ncl udi ng gears | sprockets, 
bearings and shafts (14); filtering machines (6);grit tanks (3); overhauling 
sand and sludge pumps of various sizes; overhauling the main lift pumps, 
including bearings; wearing rings, s I eeves, shafts and impel lersjvarious 
sizes of air blowers and fans, water pumps, steam pumps, gas and air 



-28- 



compressors, sand removers and chlorine system equipment. 

The Machine Shop makes and repairs parts for the low and high pressure 
water hydrants located throughout the City, such as hydrant spindles, King 
valves and nozzle gates. One Machinist Is assigned to repair the Fire 
Department's tools and hardware carried on all fire apparatus, all types of 
pressure and vacuum gauges, the overhauling and servicing of the high 
pressure equalizing valve better known In the Fire Department as the Gleason 
Valve, and the repair and servicing of all types of fire hose shut-off 
valves and repair of the 3-way monitor. The Machine Shop also keeps In 
repair the breathing oxygen air compressors and their related equipment. 
(Air purification system.) 

The high pressure system, in providing water necessary to fight large fires 
in the City, requires the services of the Machine Shop in keeping pumping 
machinery in top condition, and in repairing and making parts for the various 
fire hydrants located throughout the City. 

The Park and Recreation Department requires our services in the repair and 

overhauling of numerous irrigation and sewage pumps located throughout the 

park system, e.g. overhauling and repair of the large water pump located 
at the South Windmill, Golden Gate Park. 

The Machine Shop also does numerous jobs for Public Works, Buildings and • 
Grounds. These include the repairing of firehbuse automatic doors, air 
compressors, etc. ;duri ng the fiscal year, 40 fi rehouse doors were repaired. 
Other jobs were completed for the Asphalt Plant, Palace of the Legion of 
Honor, Youth Guidance Center, General Hospital and Materials Testing 
Laboratory, etc. 

The War Memorial also requires our services to overhaul and repair various 
pumps and mechanisms that operate the Memorial and Opera House buildings. 

The pumping station system, a division of Public Works, uses the services of 
the Machine Shop to overhaul and repair sewage and sump pumps. Included 
is making alterations such as adapting a universal drive line from motors to 
pumps. There are 12 pumping stations. 

The Hose Shop is a sub-section of the Machine Shop. This unit is charged 
with inspection, repair and distribution of all fire hose. During the past 
fiscal year 20,000 feet of new fire hose were inspected and tested. 
10,000 feet of new fire hose were labeled and distributed to the various 
Fire Department companies. Over 10,000 feet of in-service fire hose were 
inspected, repaired and sent back to the Fire Department companies. 



RECREATION & PARK SHOP 

The Golden Gate Park Shop, located at Third Avenue and South [Drive, is 
staffed by 5 Auto Machinists and one Automotive Serviceman, supervised by 
Foreman Auto Machinist James Elliot. The shop is responsible for the 
maintenance and repair of 637 units of automotive and engine-powered 
equi pment. 

During fiscal year 1976-1977, 1875 repair orders were written. This Is 544 
more jobs than last year. The increase is due to the fact that we had a 

-29- 



full complement of men during the year. 

There were 62 pieces of equipment out of service at the end of the fiscal 
year, primarily because no new replacements were purchased this year and 
very few in the prior year, resulting in much more time spent repairing 
equipment which should have been replaced because of age and rust 
condi tion. 

The 1875 repair orders written include the following major repairs: 

1. Engine overhaul to winch truck 

2. Rebuild 51 Spartan units 

3. Major repairs to three 6-man crew cab trucks 

4. Major re-design and rebuild tailgates of four 6-man crew cab 
trucks 

5. Major overhauls of 1 Triplex mowers 

6. Install new engine and other repairs to Parkmaster mower 

7. Major overhaul of engine and other works to Toro Dump unit 
for McLaren Golf Course. 

3. Major rust and body repairs to 10 wheel dump trucks 
9. Repair severe fire damage to eight yard dump trucks. 

10. Major differential repairs to Caterpillar tractor and torque 
convector repairs to Caterpillar Loader 

11. Equipment Log Splitter for transport to Camp Mather. 

In conclusion, this park fleet of 687 pieces of equi pment ,badl y deteriorated 
from age and corrosion, cannot be kept up with by the shop crew for 
preventive maintenance and regular repairs. This results in about 78 
pieces of equipment down for repairs almost all the time. 

This shop dispensed 130,802 gallons of gas, 8100 gallons of Diesel fuel 
and 1400 gal Ions of oi I . Th is Is II ,525 more gal Ions of gas, 290 more of 
Diesel fuel and 550 more of oi I than the previous year. 



HALL OF JUSTICE SERVICE STAT 101 



This branch of the Central Shops is located at 950 Bryant St., west of the 
Hall of Justice. It provides fuel and service to Police Department vehicles 
and supplies gasoline and oil to other City vehicles. The station is oporated 
7 days a week from 7:00 a.m. to midnight and is staffed with eight 
Automotive Servicemen, three Automotive Mechanics and one Automotive 
Mechanic Sub-Foreman. 

The convenient downtown location and the accelerated usage of police 
vehicles make this a high volume distribution point for fuel and lubricants 
for City vehicles. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 

Gasol i ne Dispensed 

Pol ice~~Department 520,232 gal Ions 

Other Departments 194,423 ga I Ions 

Total 714,655 gal Ions 



-30- 



Pi I Dispensed 

Pol ice Department 
Other departments 



Total 



Shop 



Area : 



Vehicles repaired (day) 
Vehicles repaired (night) 
P. A, and lube service 
Ti res changed 
Batteries serviced 
Tow jobs 
Brake jobs 

itotorcyc les 
Serviced 
Tires changed 
Batteries serviced 
'•1/C repa i rs 



12,880 quarts 
I ,646 quarts 

14,526 quarts 



4,466 
2,523 
1,321 
I ,727 

356 
I ,187 

239 



560 

334 

248 

3,205 



The motorcycle preventive maintenance and service program was Improved upon 
at this station, with the assignment of an Automotive Mechanic to perform 
scheduled services and make emergency repairs on the fleet of 303 various 
Police motorcycles. 

The production realized from this work program is expected to permit a 
marked savings in contractual motorcycle repairs in the coming fiscal year. 



-31- 



CONCLUSION 



The Central Shops 1976-1977 budget of $2,902,732.00 was funded by 
work orders in the amount of $2,609,759.00. 

Thus the shops operated through the 1976-1977 fiscal year with a 
deficit funding of $292,973.00, an I I .23^ reduction In work orders. 

To operate within this reduced allocation and at the same time cope 
with the Increased cost of labor and materials it was necessary to 
reduce staff. An average of ten (10) pormanent positions was 
unfilled throughout the year. 

The deficit funding of the 312 Index, Central Shops along with a 
reduction of two employees in the 311 budget and a program of minimal 
replacement of automotive equipment has created an undesirable 
condition within the City's automotive fleet. 

Only through the extra effort of the remaining Central Shops employees 
and the Inception of funding through Title II of the Federal Public 
Works Employment Act of 1976 were we able to ward off a severe 
degeneration of the essential automotive equipment operated by the 
various City departments. 

It is expected that a hoped for analysis of Central Shops funding and 
data recording will demonstrate the impract ical Ity of annually under- 
funding necessary maintenance and repair of City-owned capital equipment, 



-32- 



UNITS OF CITY-OWNED VEHICLES BY DEPARTMENT 



PER I DM INVENTORY RUN AS OF JUNE 30, 1977 






DEPT. 




NO 


DEPARTMENT 


III 


Adult Probation 


113 


Art Commission 


115 


Assessor 


117 


City Attorney 


119 


City Planning 


121 


Civil Service Commission 


123 


Control 1 er 


131 


S.F. Disaster Corps 


141 


District Attorney 


145 


Fi re Department 


154 


'todel Cities Program 


161 


Pol Ice Department 


165 


Publ ic Defender 


169 


Social Services 


170 


Single Men's Rehabilitation 


173 


Sheri f f 


181 


Board of Supervisors 


185 


Juveni le Court 


137 


Log Cabin 


188 


Hidden Valley School 


213 


California Academy of Sciences 


221 


Chief Administrative Officer 


223 


Coroner 


231 


Dept.of Electricity 


243 


Pub 1 i c Admi n i strator 


245 


Real Estate 


247 


Civic Auditorium 


255 


Registrar of Voters 


261 


Tax Col lector 


265 


Weights and Measures 


31 1 


Purchasing - 'lain Office 


312 


Purchasing - Central Shops 




Dept.of Public Works 


413 


Arch itecture 


415 


31 dg. 1 nspect ion 


415.1 


F.A.C.E. Program 


417 


Bldg. Repair 


417.2 


Traffic Painting 


421 


Engineeri ng 


423 


General Office 


424 


Personnel Admn . 


425 


Sewage Pumping 


427 


Sewage Treatment 


429 


Sewer Repair 


431 


Street Cleaning 



NO. OF 

VEHICLES 



5 

23 

269 

15 
430 

5 

43 
2 

59 
I 

18 
6 
2 
6 
I 
7 

42 
3 



7 
10 

5 
31 



8 

44 

7 

127 

28 

32 

I 

3 

3 

25 

I 10 

I 17 



-33- 



DEPT. 
NO. 



513 

525.1 

531 

535 

533 

551 

553 

555 

557 

561 

567 

577 



UNITS OF CITY-OWNED VEHICLES BY DEPARTMENT 
PER IBM INVENTORY RUN AS OF JUNE 30, 1977 



DEPARTMENT 



Pu 



blic Health Department 
Admi ni stration 



Communicable Disease 

Food and Sanitary Inspection 

Health Centers 

Publ ic Health Nursing 

Emergency Hospitals 

Hassler Hospital 

Laguna Honda Hospital 

S.F. General Hospital 

Mental Admn . 

Mental Health 

Bureau of Alcoholism 



NO. OF 
VEHICLES 



9 

2 

31 

5 

I 
15 

2 
12 
15 

2 
10 

3 



621 

631 

651 

651-5 

653 

653-S 



De Young Museum 
Publ ic Library 
Rec. a Park - General 
Rec.i Park - Non-Auto 
Candlestick Park 
Candlestick Park 



3 

8 

192 

494 

10 
7 



66 1 -B 
66 1 -E 
661 -F 
66 1 -G 
6.6 1 -H 
66 1 -J 
669 



681 

633 
686 



S.F. Unifie d Sc hool Dis t rlct 
John O'Connel I 
Shop Trucks 

Gardeners' Autos, etc. 
Del i very Trucks 
Admini stration 
Delivery, Furniture 
City Col lege 

Department of Publ ic Works 
DPW - Street Repair 
Bureau of Engineering 
DPW - Tree Planting 



2 
24 

17 

13 

6 

7 
44 



104 
33 
42 



161 -A 
1 6 I -M 
161 -S 
161 -T 



Pol ice Solos 
Po I i ce 3-Whee I s 
Pol ice Scooters 
Pol ice Trai I Bi kes 



SUB-TOTAL 



GRAND TOTAL 



2,631 

49 
165 

40 
19 

2,904 



-34- 



CENTRAL SHOPS 





ANNUAL REPORT 






DEPARTMENTAL 


EXPENDITURES 






216 MAINTENANCE AND 


REPAIR AUTOMOTIVE 






1976 - 


1977 




DEPT. 




WORK ORDERS 




MO. 


DEPARTMENT 


RECEIVED 


EXPENDED 


1 1 1 


Adult Probation 


$ 1,500.00 


S 1,425.00 


1 13 


Art Commission 


1 ,510.00 


1 ,246.00 


1 15 


Assessor 


1 ,000.00 


561 .00 


1 17 


City Attorney 


800.00 


675.00 


1 19 


City Planning 


1 ,200.00 


1 ,210.00 


121 


Civil Service 


275.00 


191 .00 


123 


Control ler 


350.00 


316.00 


131 


Emergency Services 


1 ,200.00 


1 ,190.00 


141 


District Attorney 


2,400.00 


4,133.00 


145 


Fl re Department 


445,000.00 


454,890.00 


145.1 


Equipment and Houses 


170,000.00 


156,185.00 


145.3 


High Pressure 


20,000.00 


8,834.00 


154 


Model Cities 


10,195.00 


13,084.00 


161 


Pol ice 


450,000.00 


445,583.00 


161 MR 


Motorcycles 


60,000.00 


63,123.00 


165 


Publ ic Defender 


2,000.00 


1 ,9 86.00 


169 


Social Services 


12,520.00 


10,901 .00 


173 


Sheriff 


31 ,512.00 


31 ,540.00 


181 


Supervisors 


600.00 


531 .00 


185 


Probation Office 


7,000.00 


8,427.00 


187 


Log Cabin 


2,400.00 


1 ,654.00 


183 


Hidden Val ley 


2,000.00 


1 ,913.00 


213 


Academy of Sciences 


1 ,105.00 


1 ,105.00 


221 


Chief Admin. Officer 


750.00 


814.00 


223 


Coroner 


2,000.00 


2,184.00 


231 


El ectri city 


13,500.00 


17,739.00 


243 


Public Administrator 


1 ,250.00 


1 ,366.00 


245 


Real Estate 


550.00 


453.00 


255 


Regi strar 


1 ,000.00 


140.00 


261 


Tax Col lector 


2,300.00 


2,298.00 


265 


'.'.'eights and 'Measures 


3,100.00 


3,151 .00 


31 1 


Purchasing 


1 ,000.00 


1 ,358.00 


413 


Architecture 


3,150.00 


3,284.00 


415 


Du i 1 ding 1 nspect ion 


13,000.00 


17,368.00 


417 


Bui 1 ding Repa i r 


34,100.00 


34,528.00 


417.2 


Traffic Painting 


10,000.00 


9,087.00 


421 


Engi neeri ng 


15,500.00 


13,486.00 


423 


General Office 


675.00 


326.00 


424 


Personnel Admini strati 


on 1,600.00 


1 ,640.00 



-35- 



216 Maintenance and Repa l £ Aut omot I ve 





1976-1977 






DEPT. 




WORK ORDERS 




NO. 


DEPARTMENT 


RECEIVED 
1,500.00 


EXPENDED 


425 


Sewage Pumping 


1,960.00 


427 


Sewage Treatment 


7,000.00 


6,357.00 


429 


Sewer Repal r 


65,009.00 


66.567.00 


431 


Street Cleaning 


147,900.00 


150,786.00 


141.2 


Fami 1 y Support 


1 ,590.00 


553.00 


415.1 


F.A.C.E. 


2,736.00 


1 ,728.00 


431 .1 


Broom Cores 


12,652.00 


6,785.00 


431 .3 


Garageman 


18,900.00 


20,451.00 


431.4 


Auto Machinist 


63,769.00 


63,125.00 


513 


Admi nistration 


3,609.00 


3,617.00 


531 


Food and Sanitation 


10,950.00 


8,032.00 


535 


Health Centers 


1 ,600.00 


1 ,297.00 


545 


Communicable Disease 


2,100.00 


1, 773.00 


551 


Emergency Hospital 


48,000.00 


44,245.00 


553 


Hassler Home 


-0 - 


433.00 


555 


Laguna Honda Hospital 


5,000.00 


4,435.00 


557 


San Francisco Hospital 


7,900.00 


5,816.00 


567 


Mental Health 


10,050.00 


10,265.00 


577 


Bureau of Alcoholism 


825.00 


1,168.00 


621 


Fine Arts Museum 


920.00 


701.00 


631 


Library 


5,800.00 


5,688.00 


651 


Recreation and Park 


247,000.00 


250,061 .00 


651.9 


Recreation and Park-General 


3,500.00 


3,497.00 


653 


Candlestick Park 


2,000.00 


2,608.00 


661 


School District 


59,900.00 


53,258.00 


669 


City Col lege 


26,300.00 


20,619.00 


631 


Street Repai r 


130,000.00 


142,361 .00 


681 AS 


Army Street 


46,100.00 


37,468.00 


633 


Traffic Engineering 


14,500.00 


16,417.00 


684 


Road Fund 


3,500.00 


2,933.00 


686 


Street Planting 


16,500.00 


15,057.00 


725 


Airport 


25,500.00 


23,092.00 






$2,329,653.00 


$2,303,188.00 




Add: Funds budgeted and 








expended for special Work Orders 


230,106.00 


252,659.00 



Funds expended for miscellaneous 
items (Retirements, Payments in 
lieu of Sick Leave, Vacation, etc. ) 

Unexpended Balance 



39,031 .00 
14,881 .00 



$2,609,759.00 $2,609,759.00 



-36- 



CENTRAL SHOPS 





ANNUAL REPORT 








1976 - 1977 


AMOUNT BUDGETED 






COMPARISON OF EXPENDITURES WITH 




INDEX 




BUDGETED 


EXPENDED 


312 


SUMMARY 


1976 - 1977 
$137,947.00 


1976 - 1977 


I 10 


Permanent Salaries 


395,907.00 


1 1 1 


Overtime 


2,203.00 


2,203.00 


1 12 


Hoi i day Pay 


679.00 


229.00 


133 


Salaries - Drafts 


1 ,495,881 .00 


1 ,325,799.00 


1 1 1 


Overtime - Crafts 


II ,320.00 


9,997.00 


1 12 


Holiday Pay - Crafts 


2,373.00 


1 ,801 .00 


132 


Temporary Salaries - Crafts 


73,015.00 


72,528.00 


200 


Contractual Services 


243,444.00 


168,052.00 


300 


Materials and Supplies 


589,385.00 


574,296.00 


800 


Fixed Charges 


60.00 


60.00 


863 


Mandatory Fringe Benefits 


.345,425.00 


344,006.00 




Central Shops Budget 


32,902,732.00 


32,594,878.00 




52,902,732.00 






Actual Work Orders Received 


2,609,759.00 






Less: Total Expenditures 


(2,594,878.00) 






Unexpended Balance 


314,331 .00 




INDEX 




BUDGETED 


EXPENDED 


31 1 


SUMMARY 


1976 - 1977 


1976 - 1977 


1 10 


Permanent Salaries 


57,055.00 


57,055.00 


130 


Wages 


226,014.00 


215,407.00 


131 


Holiday Pav and Overtime 


8,363.00 


5,772.00 


132 


Temporary Wages 


3,88 1 .00 


1 ,472.00 


3G3 


Mandatory Fringe Benefits 


67,954.00 


67.954.00 






3363,267.00 


3347,660.00 




Unexpended Balance 




20,607.00 




3368,267.00 


3363,267.00 






— — 


, , 



-37- 



CENTRAL SHOPS 



ANNUAL REPORT 



GASOLINE EXPENDITURES 



1976-1977 



DEPT. 




NO. 


DEPARTMENT 


Ill 


Adult Probation 


113 


Art Commission 


115 


Assessor 


117 


City Attorney 


1 19 


City Planning 


121 


Civil Service 


123 


Control ler 


131 


Emergency Services 


141 


District Attorney 


141.2 


Fami 1 y Support 


145 


Fi re Department 


151 


Mayor 


154 


Model Cities 


161 


Pol ice 


165 


Publ ic Defender 


169 


Social Services 


173 


Sheriff 


181 


Supervisors 


185 


Probation Office 


187 


Log Cabin 


188 


Hidden Va 1 ley 


213 


Academy of Sciences 


221 


Chief Administrative Officer 


223 


Coroner 


231 


Electricity 


243 


Public Administrator 


245 


Roal Estate 


255 


Reqi strar 


261 


Tax Col lector 


265 


Weights and Measures 


31 1 


Purchasing 


312 


Central Shops 


413 


Architecture 


415 


3ui 1 di ng Inspection 


417 


Bui 1 di ng Repai r 


417.2 


Traffic Painting 


421 


Engi neering 


423 


General Office 


424 


Personnel Administration 


425 


Sewage Pumping 


427 


Sewage Treatment 


429 


Sewer Repai r 



EXPENDED 

$ 651 .00 

I ,360.00 

20.00 

18.00 

871 .00 

27.00 

26.00 

I ,203.00 

4,418.00 

2,528.00 

701.00 

185.00 

7,881 .00 

263,491 .00 

2,275.00 

4,126.00 

12,1 15.00 

414.00 

4> 173.00 

462.00 

49.00 

I ,106.00 

765.00 

2,233.00 

14,017.00 

778.00 

120.00 

251.00 

I ,533.00 

I ,775.00 

737.00 

6,344.00 

I ,938.00 

13,355.00 

30,201 .00 

3,920.00 

10,446.00 

107.00 

917. 00 

I ,556.00 

6,846.00 

24,861.00 



-3R- 



CENTRAL SHOPS 





ANNUAL REPORT 




GASOLINE EXPENDITURES 




1976- 1977 






DEPT.NO. 


DEPARTMENT 


431 


Street Cleaning 


513 


Admin Istrat ion 


531 


Food and Sanitation 


535 


Health Centers 


545 


Communicable Disease 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 


555 


Laguna Honda Hospital 


557 


S.F. Hospital 


567 


'■lental Health 


577 


Bureau of Alcoholism 


621 


Fi ne Arts Museum 


631 


Library 


651 


Recreation and Park 


661 


School District 


669 


City Col lege 


681 


Street Repair 


683 


Traff ic Engl neering 


684 


Road Fund 


686 


Street Planting 


735 


Muni Rai 1 way 


745 


Water Department 


755 


Hetch Hetchy 


775 


Port Commission 



EXPENDED 

$71,965.00 

I ,336.00 

5,238.00 

516.00 

620.00 

6,501.00 

136.00 

4,742.00 

7,915.00 

I ,303.00 

414.00 

2,447.00 

3,960.00 

15,393.00 

825.00 

39,317.00 

10,786.00 

I ,915.00 

8,719.00 

2,153.00 

7.00 

987.00 

48.00 



$618,543.00 



-39- 



CENTRAL SHOPS JOB ORDERS: 



12,000 
11,000 
10,000 
9,000 
8,000 
7,000 
6,000 
5,000 
4,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 




10,494 



9,251 



9,384 



1372-1973" 1975-1974 1574-1975 1 975- 1 976 1976-1 977 




$2,037,998 $2,139,440 



CENTRAL SHOPS EXPENDITURES: 
3,000,000 
2,750,000 
2,500,000 
2,250,000 
2,000,000 
1,750,000 
1,500,000 
1,250,000 
1,000,000 

750,000 

500,000 

250,000 



$2,430,951 



$2,594,878 



1972-1973 1973-1974 1974-1975 1975-1976 1976-1977 



-40- 



GALLONS OF GASOLINE DISPENSED THROUGH THE CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 



1,550,000 

1,500,000 

1,450,000 

1,400,000 

1,350,000 

1,300,000 

1,250,000 

1,200,000 

1,150,000 

I, 100,000 

950,000 

900,000 

850,000 



1,023,523 



I 



1,216,017 

1 



1,438,270 

1 

I 



1,1 18,166 



1 

I 



1,342,209 



i 



1972-1973 



1973-1974 



1974-1975 



1975-1976 1976-1977 



Hall of Justice Station 
Quint St. Station 
Army St. Station 
19th Ave. Station 
Recreation & Park Station 

TOTAL 



714,655 ga I Ions 
168, 165 gal Ions 
265,324 gal Ions 
63,263 gal Ions 
130,802 gal Ions 



1,342,209 gal Ions 



-41- 



HOW CENTRAL SHOPS SPENT WORK ORDERS (312) 

DUR I NG T HE YEAR I $ 7 6- 1 37 7 




GRAND TOTAL WORK ORDERS EXPENDED 
1975-1976 COMPARISON 



2,594,878.00 
2,430,951.00 



-42- 



HOW CENTRAL SHOPS SPENT 311 & 312 FUNDS 
DURING THE YEAR 1976-1977 




GRAND TOTAL 
GRAND TOTAL 



I 976- 

1975- 



1977 
1976 



2,942,538.00 
2,799,341.00 



-43- 



CITY A COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
PURCHASING DEPT. CENTRAL SHOPS 
ORGANIZATION CHART 



1162 Purchaser of Supplies 
Department Head 



7150 City Shops Gen. Super, 
Adml n I strati on 



7277 City Shops Ast. Super. 
Supervision 



STORES - SUPPLIES 
(By Assignment, 
Central Warehouse) 
1936 Sr. Storekeeper 
1954 Storekeeper 



FIRE SHOPS 

7254 Auto Mach. Supervi sor ( I ) 

7315 Auto Mach. Asst. Supervl sor( I ) 

7313 Auto Machinists) 

7410 Auto Service Worker (4) 

BODY 

75756" Body Fender Wk'rd ) 

BLACKSMITH 

7389 Metal smith (3) 

PAINT 

7309 Car-Auto Pa inter (3) 

PATTERN 

7358 Patternmaker (2) 

UPHOLSTERY 

7387 Upholsterer(l) 

DELIVERIES 

01 Chauffeur(l) 



AUTO SHOPS 

7249 Auto Mechanic Supervisor ( I ) 

7381 Auto Mechanic(8) 

7410 Auto Service Worker (2) 

POLICE GARAGE 

7382 Auto Mech. Asst. Super.(l) 

7381 Auto Mechanlc(3) 

7410 Auto Service Worker (8) 

D.P.H. & D.ofE. GARAGE 

7410 Auto Service Worker ( I ) 

BODY 

7306 Body Fender Worker (2) 

PAINT 

7309 Car-Auto Palnter(l) 



GENERAL OFFICE 
1652 Sr. Accounta nt 
1632 Sr. Account Clerk 
1630 Account Clerk 
1222 Sr. Pay.-Pers. Clerk 
1424 Clerk Typist 



TRUCK SHOPS 

7254 Auto Mach. Supervi sor ( I ) 

7315 Auto Mach. Asst. Supervi sor ( I ) 

7313 Auto Machinists) 

7410 Auto Service Worker (2) 

D.P.W. STATION 

7313 Auto Machinists) 

7412 Auto Srvc. Wk'r Ast.Spr.(l) 

7410 Auto Service Worker (3) 

QUINT ST. STATION 

7410 Auto Service Worker ( I ) 

19th AVE. STATION 

7410 Auto Service Worker ( I ) 

TIRE SHOP 

7410 Auto Service Worker (2) 

BLACKSMITH 

7389 Metalsmith(l) 



MACHINE SHOPS 

7258 Main. Mach. Supervi sor ( I ) 

7332 Maintenance Machinist (5) 

S.E. SEWAGE PLANT 

7352 Main. Machlni st ( 2 ) 

N.P. SEWAGE PLANT 

7352 Main. Machlni st ( I ) 

R.S. SEWAGE PLANT 

7332 Main. Machlni st ( I ) 



G.G. PARK SHOP 

7254 Auto Mach. Superv i sor ( I ) 
7313 Auto Machinist (5) 
7410 Auto Service Worker(l) 



SP 









-7 



BJYING 
DIVISION 



OOCL 






REPRODUCTION 

DIVISION 



CITY & COUNTY OF 
SAN FRANCISCO 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

ANNUAL REPORT 
1977 - 1978 



PERSONNEL 
& ACCOUNTS 
DIVISION 






STORES & 
EOU I PMENT 
DIVISION 



CENTRAL 

SHOPS 

DIVISION 






November 1978 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FISCAL YEAR 
1977 - 1978 



City and County 

of 

San Francisco 




Purchasing Department 

-BUYING DIVISION 
-PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS DIVISION 
-STORES & EQUIPMENT DIVISION 
-REPRODUCTION DIVISION 
-CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 



JOSEPH C. GAVIN 
PURCHASER OF SUPPL I ES 



TABLE OP CONTENTS 

Page 

PROLOGUE 1 

ORGANIZATION 2 

SEPARATIONS & WORK ACCOMPLISHED 4 

BUYING DIVISION 5-13 

Procurement 5 

Operations 6 

Coding Section 12 

PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS DIVISION 14-15 

Bid Section 1*4 

Payroll Section 14 

Accounting Section 14 

Accounts Payable Section 15 

STORES & EQUIPMENT DIVISION 16-19 

Inventory Section 17 

Stores Section 17 

Sales Section 18 

REPRODUCTION DIVISION 20 

CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 21-51 

Introduction 22-26 

Fire Apparatus Shop 23 

Pattern & Ladder Shop 24 

Paint Shop 24 

Electric Shop 25 

Blacksmith Shop 25 

Upholstery Shop 26 

Truck & Heavy Equipment Shop 27-28 

Army Street D.P.W. Station 28 

19th Avenue D.P.W. Station 28 

Quint Street Station 28 

Tire Shop 28 

Auto & Light Truck Shop 29 

Machine Shop 30 

Recreation & Park Shop 32 

Hall of Justice Service Station 33 

Conclusion 34 

Financial Statements & Charts 35-51 



City and County off San Francisco 



Purchasing Department 




November 20, 1978 



Mr. Roger Boas 

Chief Administrative Officer 

City and County of San Francisco 

289 City Hal I 

San Francisco, California 94102 

Dear Mr. Boas: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year 

ending June 30, 1978, is submitted herewith in accordance with the 

provisions of Section 3.501 of the Charter of the City and County 

of San Francisco. 

Very truly yours, 



JOSEPH C. GAVIN 

Director of Purchasing and Services 

JCG/et 



(415) 558-5026 



Room 270, City Hall 



San Francisco 94102 



ORGANIZATION CHART 



City and County of San Francisco 
Purchasing Department 



{CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERl 



PURCHASER OF SUPPLIES | 

ASST. DIRECTOR OF 
PURCHASING & SERVICES 



BUYING DIVISION 

Asst. Dlr. of Purchasing & Servlcesd 

- Sr. Clerk Typlstd ) 
Sr, Purchaser - Specification & 

Standard izatlonl I ) 
Sr. Purchaser - Buying Staff (I) 
Sr. Purchaser - S.F. General Hosp.(l) 
Sr. Purchaser - Municipal Railway! I) 
Purchaser(6) 
Purchaser - Prlntlnq(2) 



Cod I ng Section 
Coding Supervisor ( I ) 
ClgrkU? 



CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 

City Shops General Super I ntendent( I ) 

City Shops Asst. Superintendent! I ) 

Sr. Accountant! I ) 

Sr. Account Clerk! I ) 

Account Clerk! I ) 

Sr. Payro I I -Personnel Clerk! I) 

Clerk Typlstd ) 

Auto Mach. Supervisor (3) 

Auto Mach. Asst. Supervl sor (2) 

Auto Machlnlst(25) 

Auto Service Worker (25) 

Metalsmith(4) 

Car-Auto Pa Inter (4) 

Patternmaker (2) 

Uphol sterer! I ) 

Chauf feurd ) 

Auto Service Worker Asst. Super. (I) 

Auto Mechanic Supervl sor ( I ) 

Auto Mech. Asst. Supervl sor ( I ) 

Auto Mechanic! I I ) 

Body Fender Worker (3) 

Mai ntenance Mach. Superv I sor ( I ) 

Mai ntenance Mac hi n 1st (91 



•Stenographic Secretary 
■Sr. clerk Typist 



PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS DIVISION" 

Chief Clerk! I ) 

Principal Clerk! I) 

Sr. Accountant! I ) 

Payrol I Clerk! I ) 

Sr. Clerkd ) 

Sr. Clerk Typlst(6) 

Clerk(6) 

Clerk Typlst(3) 



REPRODUCTION DIVISION 

Blueprint & Reproduction Manager! I) 

Sr. Account Clerk! I ) 

Photo-L I thographer ( I ) 

Photographer ( I ) 

Reproduction Superv I sor (I) 

Sr. Offset Mach. Operator!!) 

Offset Mach. Operator (I ) 

Sr. Blueprinting Mach. Operator!!) 

Blueprinting Mach. 0perator(2) 



STORES & EQUIPMENT DIVISION 

Stores & Equipment Supervisor ( I ) 

Asst. Stores & Equipment Supervisor ( I ) 

Sr, Clerk Stenographer ( I ) 

Sr. Clerk Typlstd ) 

Sr. Storekeeper ( 12) 

Storekeeper (22) 

Asst. Storekeeper (9) 

Inventory Clerk(2) ^^ 




-2- 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

serves all departments of 
the City & County, 
Including City-owned 
utilities, the San 
Francisco Port 
Commission & the San 
Francisco Community 
Col lege District. 



STORES & EQUIPMENT DIVI SION-- maintains 
& operates a central warehouse & store- 
rooms In various City Departments; 
transfers or disposes of equipment and 
supplies no longer useful to 
departments; maintains a perpetual 
Inventory of City equipment Including 
al I City vehicles. 



REPRODUCTION DIVISION— operates a 
central reproduction facility for all 
departments requiring Its 
serv I ces . 



CENTRAL SHOPS 
DIVISION — repairs 
& maintains auto- 
motive & other 
equipment for the 
various departments. 
Community Col lege 
District & for the 
School District. 



BUYING DIVISIONS PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 

— Is responsible^ DIVISION — handles the 

for the procurements, clerical & supportive duties of 

of supplies, equipment^ purchasing, Involving the Bid 

services & Insurance. N. Section, Accounts Payable 

Coding Section carries . N. Section, Payroll Section & 

on the development & N^ the Accounting Section, 
application of. the material 
& supplies Identification 
coding system. 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT: 

J.C. Gavin - Purchaser of Supplies (Department Head) 

BUYING DIVISION 

R. Tecco - Asst. Director of Purchasing & Services (Division Head) 

G. Burket - Senior Purchaser, Specifications & Standardization 

R. Erlckson - Senior Purchaser, Buying Staff 

J. Breslln - Senior Purchaser, San Francisco General Hospital 

F. Lahaderne - Senior Purchaser, Municipal Railway 

Vacant * Coding Supervisor 

PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS DIVISION 

H. Lundle - Chief Clerk (Division Head) 

Vacant - Principal Clerk 

STORES & EQUIPMENT DIVISION 

H. Gheno - Stores & Equipment Supervisor (Division Head) 

A. Carlgnanl - Stores & Equipment Assistant Supervisor (Acting) 

REPRODUCTION DIVISION 

E. Fundis - Blueprint & Reproduction Manager (Division Head) 



CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 

A.M. Flaherty - General Superintendent of City Shops (Division Head) 

E. Franke - Assistant Superintendent of City Shops (Acting) 

-3- 



RATIONS: 



RttiRED 

NAME 

Porker, Thomas C. 
tWenberg, George 
Cook, Ralph B. 
Bat tag I la, Anthony 

Rames, Edmond A. 
Murray, Roy B. 
Sanini, Vincent 
Davis, Leroy H. 
Kanzel , Miriam M. 
Flaherty, George M. 
Suen, Raymond 



Scott, Harry (Temp.) 
Gibbons, Anna M. 



RECAPITULATION OF WORK ACCOMPLISHED: 



DIVISION 



Buying 



Personnel 4 
Accounts 



Stores & Equipment 

Reproduction 
Centra I Shops 



UNIT 

Purchase Orders 

Do I lar Amount 
Encumbrance Request Amount 
Personal & Professional Service 

Contracts Amount 

TOTAL 

Bids Processed: 

Price Quotations 

Informal Bids 

Formal Bids 

Term Contracts 
Purchase Order Discounts Earned 
Sale of City Documents 

Surplus Sales Amount 
Warehouses in Operation 
Average Daily Inventory on Hand 

Services Rendered Amount 

Expenditures 

Gaso I ine Dispensed (Gallons) 



-4- 



1976- 


977 


1977- 


978 


26 
$31,526, 
$84,854 


,425 
554 
,016 


28 
$33,836 
$95,325 


,361 
,812 
961 


$14,446 
,130,827 


,950 
520 


$19,958, 
$149,121, 


628 
40 1 


6 

2 

$76 
$12 


,075 
,245 
322 
155 
,318 
164 


6,367 

2,354 

364 

130 

$148,902 

$20,008 


$162,695 

II 

$3,975,148 


$188 
$4,839 


451 

II 

,083 


$236 


,234 


$246 


,671 


$2,594 
1,342 


,878 
,209 


$2,677 
1,470 


,300 
,274 





APPR0X. 


YEARS 






OF 




POSITION 


CITY SERVICE 


RETIRED 


Storekeeper 


12 


yrs 


7-01-77 


Purchaser 


17 


yrs 


7-01-77 


Automotive Mechanic 


8 


yrs 


9-01-77 


Coding Supervisor 








(Not a member of Retirement 


System) 




1 2-28-77 


City Shops Asst. Supt. 


36 


yrs 


1-01-78 


Maintenance Machinist 


25 


yrs 


2-04-78 


Automotive Mechanic 


14 


yrs 


3-31-78 


Senior Storekeeper 


15 


yrs 


4-15-78 


Purchaser, Printing 


17 


yrs 


4-29-78 


Truck Driver 


39 


yrs 


6-17-78 


Reproduction Supervisor 1 


27 


yrs 


6-23-78 
DECEASED 


Automotive Mechanic 


2.5 


yrs 


10-20-77 


Chief Clerk 


34 


yrs 


1 1 -26-77 



BUYING DIVISION 

The Buying Division, under the supervision of the Assistant Director 
of Purchasing and Services, is responsible for the procurement of supplies, 
equipment, services and Insurance for all City and County departments and 
the San Francisco Community College District. As requisitions are received 
from the various City and County Agencies they are converted either directly 
to purchase orders, as in the case of term contract Items, or to formal or 
Informal bids by the appropriate buyer according to commodity code. Generally, 
the procurement functions (outlined in detail in a previous report) are as 
f o 1 1 ows : 

I. BUYING - BIDS AND AWARDS 

Evaluation by requisition document to determine type of 
procurement action to be taken; preparation of bids to 
include contractual and technical requirements; analysis 
and award of bids. 

II. BUYING - RELATED FUNCTIONS 

Analysis of records of previous purchases specifically 
related to factors of average use; maintenance of indi- 
vidual specification files and library of pertinent cata- 
logs and technical data; research on new items; prepara- 
tion of new and review and/or revision of old term con- 
tracts; and procedural review. 

BUYING PERSONNEL 

The buying staff consists of the following personnel: 

I - Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 
Robert Tecco 

4 - Senior Purchasers 

Raymond F. Erlckson - Buying Staff Supervisor 
George F. Burket - Specifications and Standardization 
James Breslin - San Francisco General Hospital 
Felix Lahaderne - San Francisco Municipal Railway 



6 - Purchasers 

Douglas Good speed 

Howard Phelps 

Bernard Savant 

Claude Webster 

James Campbel I (Probationary) 

2 - Purchasers (Printing) 
Robert Runneals 
(Other position vacant) 

2 - CETA Staff Aides 
Lewis Brown 
Donald We in 



These buyers procure all 
the materials, supplies, 
equipment, and services 
requested by all the various 
departments and agencies in 
the City and County of S.F. 
This group purchases well 
over 100,000 different items 
per year which range from 
simple supplies such as 
pencils to the most complex 
Items of equipment. 



-5- 



OPERATIONS 



1. Purchasing workload is assigned to the individual buyer on a broad 
commodity basis with allowance for items of a special nature or in 
cases where seasonal peaks or vacations make it advisable to deviate 
from this policy. Budget equipment is also spread throughout the 
buying staff to prevent an overload on any particular buyer. The 
vast number of commodities ( 100,000) and the insufficient staff 

(8 buyers) makes it totally impossible for buyer specialization in 
any commodity. 

2. Periodic meetings of the buying staff are held to permit the exchange 
of ideas; the formulation of improved operating procedures; discussions 
of mutual problems; review and refinement of existing procedures; and in 
general to keep the staff apprised of the City-wide purchasing picture. 

3. In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish Informa- 
tion that will Indicate a standard of overall quality and usefulness 
suitable for actual use requirements, and to permit competitive bidding 
as required by the Charter and Administrative Code. The forms devised 
for this purpose make It easier for departments to furnish desired infor- 
mation for bid purposes. 

4. As time Is available, personnel are assigned to: 

a. Review specifications, forms, and procedures. 

b. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services where 
desireable. Term contracts added during the past fiscal 
year, are as follows: 

77335 Flocculant, Cat Ionic, Polymers Sewage Treatment 

71675 Recondition GMC Impellers Muni Railway 

85850 Concrete Pumping Service S.F. Port Commission 

79804 Repair Furniture Airport 

83670 Janitorial Service Health Department 

83680 Janitorial Service Social Service 

93060 Fi Im Processing Col lege District 

5. Whenever practical, term contracts are entered Into for various services 
and commodities that are In general use by several departments or are 
recurringly used by a department. The main advantages are elimination 
of the time lag resulting when Individual bids are requested and elimina- 
tion of the cost involved in individual bids. Term contracts must be 
periodically revised and specifications updated. New Items are added as 
requ I red . 



-6- 



6. Major purchases included the following: 



Proposal 

Number 



Description 

Department 



Amount 



593 Chairs; Community College $ 56,747.05 

620 Security Officer Guard Service; Muni Railway 57,614.96 

453 Homemaker/Chore; Social Service 2,583,840.00 

614 Coin Counter, Sorter, Wrapper; Muni Railway 38,710.80 

626 Overhead Line Truck; Muni Railway 44,688.50 

639 Polyvinyl Chloride Sheeting, Protective, Pilings; S.F.P.C. 115,533.49 
636 Milling Machine; Muni Railway 30,844.35 

640 Cleaning Service, Candlestick; Rec/Park 32,000.00 

641 Conversion of Movable Stands, Candlestick; Rec/Park 23,670.00 
546 Equip, for light Rail Vehicle Maintenance; Muni Railway 111,601.00 
646 Sodium Silicof louride; Water 25,504.00 
652 Fire Hose; Fire 67,760.00 
645 Tables and Benches; Sheriff 28,466.00 
649 Brake Shoes, Cast Steel; Muni Railway 23,670.00 
675 Pamphlet, Prtd. , Elect ion; Register of Voters 82,534.00 
674 Welding Supplies; Community College 32,516.00 
695 Forms, Set, Printed, Misc.; Public Health SFGH 23,559.93 
690 Valve, Gate; Water 36,531.24 
707 Bags, Polyethlene; Public Works 28,800.00 
644 Wearing Apparel - Patient; Public Health 34,750.00 
671 Motor Trucks; Various 311,992.70 
709 Automobiles; Various 400,967.46 
698 Shear, Hydraulic; Muni Railway 35,267.00 
715 Sweepers, Street 6 Industrial; Public Works 220,400.00 
749 Fire Hydrants; Fire 26,757.50 
752 Dry Goods; Various 28,094.02 
738 Truck W/25 - Ton Wrecker Body; Muni Railway 64,993.00 
765 Pipe, Steel, Welded; CAO 29,824.00 
778 Backhoe-Loader; Airport Commission 26,562.00 
808 Tables and Chairs; Airport Commission 22,454.23 
740 Police Cars; Police 75,824.55 
728 Wearing Apparel -Operating Room; Health 23,483.50 

803 Feeder System; Water 28,435.00 
836 Mix, Cinder-Clay; Rec/Park 67,500.00 
757 Microscope, Opthalmic; Health 26,615.00 
617 Repainting Diesel Transit Type Motor Coaches; Muni Railway 473,280.00 

804 A Computer System for the S.F. Public Utilities 

Commission Computer Center; PUC 1,580,982.00 

817 Video Equipment; Police 34,012.30 

811 Motor Trucks and Eductor; Various 228,336.50 

742 Rail & Tie Plates; Railway 375,349.96 

822 Furnish £ Install, Radio, Mobil; Airport Commission 20,462.00 

681 Furnishing 5 Installing a computerized circulation 

control system for Public Library; Library 388,540.00 

865 Receptacles , Litter, Exposed aggregate; Various 22,880.00 

869 Motorcycles, 3-wheel ; Police 24,965.00 

874 Pamphlet, Printed, Election; Register of Voters 54,534.00 

851 Booklet, Printed, City College Catalog 1978-79; Com. Catalog 28,259.84 



-7- 



Proposal Description 

Number Department Amount 

893 Sign Post 5 Bracket, Aluminum; Public Works $ 20,731.00 

725 Fare Collection System ; Muni Railway 1,560,669.00 

841 UHF Base/Mobile Radio System; Muni Railway 1,777,082.00 

921 Contemporary Furniture; Airport 202,243.79 

918 Motor Trucks, Muni Railway 57,720.58 

926 Fire Truck, Aerial Ladder; Fire Dept. 126,987.00 

916 Rake § Lawn Mowers; Rec/Park 25,390.68 

957 Wire, Trolley; Hetch Hetchy 21,350.00 

955 Printer; Police 22,192.20 

951 Processor, Color Film Print; Police 21,898.00 



MUNICIPAL RAILWAY ACTIVITIES 

RTA 

The Purchasing Department, thru the Municipal Railway Department, Is a 
member of the Regional Transit Association. It is represented on the Joint 
procurement committee by a Senior Purchaser. 

In the last year San Francisco has collaborated In the preparation of 
five bids of common interest, and accepted participation on one joint contract. 

Also, during this period an "Open Stores" mutual aid policy for materials 
was used, to the benefit and service of the several RTA members. 

LRV 

The Purchasing Department thru its Senior Purchaser at Municipal Railway 
is cooperating in the processing of an estimated $8,000,000.00 In spare parts 
for anticipated fleet of Boe I ng-Verto I Light-Rail Vehicles. 

To be purchased are approximately 850 items, ranging from capital equipment 
to common hardware. 

SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL HOSPITAL ACTIVITIES 

The Senior Purchaser at San Francisco General Hospital Is responsible for 
material acquisition of all the surgical and medical supplies and all general 
use items necessary to support the Hospital operation. 

Fiscal 1977-1978 was an extremely active year for capital equipment purchases 
as nearly $600,000 in capital equipment was purchased. The fiscal year also showed 
significant improvements in the CPD (Central Nursing Supply) operation. The impor- 
tance of the purchasing function was recognized when the Senior Purchaser was awarded 
the "Employee Who Cares" award by the Executive Administrator of San Francisco 
General Hospital. 

-8- 



CONCLUSION 

The problems of the Buying Division are the same as in previous years and 
are worthy of repetition: 

Civil Service Lists fail to provide fully qualified personnel due to: 

a. Low pay In comparison to comparable public and private employers. I.e., 
the existing top step of 1952 Purchaser is less than the mid-point salary 
of Kaiser Hospital in Oakland (San Francisco top step $l525/m vs Kaiser 
SI465-l750/m). 

b. Excessive work load per buyer. 

c. Poor fringe benefits in comparison to both public and private sector 
compensation. 

d. Requirement to start under a new retirement plan, and 

e. Restrictions on residency. 

The workload of the buying staff relative to their number is so over- 
whelming that quantity of work must be stressed over quality in order that 
the using departments receive their requirements within a reasonable space 
of time. Only with the assistance of two very capable CETA staff aides was 
the division able to keep its head above water. 

With no increases in salary for the past two years, it will be completely 
Impossible to recruit buyers In the future. This Is especially true in light 
of the passage of Proposition 13 and the Inability to hire qualified buyers 
will have an adverse effect on all City departments. 



100,000,000 
95,000,000 
90,000,000 
85,000,000 
80,000,000 
75,000,000 
70,000,000 
65,000,000 
60,000,000 
55,000,000 
50,000,000 
45,000,000 
40,000,000 
35,000,000 
30,000,000 
25,000,000 
20,000,000 
15,000,000 
10,000,000 
5,000,000 



PURCHASE ORDERS — 

ENCUMBRANCE REQUESTS 

PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTS 




1973-1974 



1974-1975 



1975-1976 1976-1977 1977-1978 



•PURCHASE ORDERS: 




ENCUMBRANCE REQUESTS: 


Year 


Number 


Dol lar Amount 


Year 
1977-78 


Dol lar Amount 


1977-78 


28,361 


533,830,812 


$95,325,961 


1976-77 


26,425 


$31,526,554 


1 976-77 


$84,854,016 


1975-76 


31,039 


$29,202,104 


1975-76 


$67,649,000 


1974-75 


32,969 


$32,992,494 


1974-75 


$74,841,892 


1973-74 


35,681 


$33,134,213 


1973-74 


$53,824,213 



•Decrease In number of Purchase Orders Issued Is attributable to Purchasing Dept. 
efforts to reduce same by combining requisitions, requesting departments to order 
optimum quantities, Increasing the revolving fund purchase limit, and other pro- 
cedures that have resulted in decreased costs and increased efficiencies. 



PERSONAL 4 PROFESSIONAL 
SERVICE CONTRACTS: 



COMBINED TOTAL OF PURCHASE ORDERS, 
ENCUMBRANCE REQUESTS & SERVICE CONTRACTS: 



Year 



1977-78 
1976-77 
1975-76 
1 974-75 
1 973-74 



Dol lar Amount 



$19,958,628 

$14,446,950 

$12,076,484 

$ 3,000,000 (Est.) 

$ 2,518,652 



Year 



1977-78 
1976-77 
1975-76 
1974-75 
1973-74 



Dol lar Amount 



$149,115,400 
$130,827,520 
$108,927,588 
$110,834,386 
$ 89,477,078 



-10- 



PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED: 



GENERAL 



Year 



Number 



1977-78 14,580 

1976-77 13,012 

1975-76* 12,430 

1974-75 13,431 

1973-74 14,453 



Do I lar Amount 



$17,080,537 
$14,026,630 
$12,539,423 
$14,069,190 
$13,846,231 



EDUCATION 



Year Number 



1977-78 2,818 
1976-77 2,459 
1975-76* 7,558 
1974-75 8,018 
1973-74 9,663 



Do I lar Amount 



$2,154,280 
$2,791,339 
$5,303,784 
$6,029,496 
$7,075,882 



HEALTH 



Year 



UTILITIES 



Number 



1977-78 5,896 

1976-77 5,715 

1975-76* 5,325 

1974-75 5,537 

1973-74 5,631 



Dol lar Amount 



$7,552,948 
$7,905,781 
$5,590,383 
$6,347,948 
$5,270,191 



Year 



Number 



1977-78 5,067 
1976-77 5,239 
1975-76* 5,726 
1974-75 5,983 
1973-74 5,934 



Dol lar Amount 



$7,043,047 
$6,802,804 
$5,768,514 
$6,545,860 
$6,941,909 



COMBINED TOTAL 



Year 



Number 



1977-78 28,361 
1976-77 26,425 
1975-76* 31,039 
1974-75 32,969 
1973-74 35,681 



Dol lar Amount 



$33,830,812 
$31,526,554 
$29,202,104 
$32,992,494 
$33,134,213 



April 1976 - Separation of San Francisco Unified School District purchasing function 



CODING SECTION : 

The Coding Section commenced operations in October, 1962. It was established 
to furnish the City and County of San Francisco with statistical data about com- 
modities procured by the Purchasing Department for the various City departments 
and to create a uniform code In all departments for ordering and inventory. The 
goals of the coding system were to achieve the followina: 

1 . Computer I zed I nventory Contro I , 

2. Standardization of Material & Supplies, 

3. Budgetary Information, 

4. Selection of Effective Ordering Quantities, 

5. Information for Interdepartment Transfers of Surplus Commodities, 

6. Reduction in Inventory Requirements. 

A nine-digit commodity coding system was set up using standard nomenclature 
in general accordance with the guidelines of the Federal Supply Catalog. An 
example of a commodity code follows: 

3 75 21 2105 EA Punch, two-hole, 2 3/4 In. span 

3 — the object of expenditure (O.E.), 3 designates Material 4 
Supplies, a 4 would be used if the item was equipment; 

75 represents the group number for Office Supplies 4 Devices; 

21 — indicates the class number for Office Devices 4 Accessories, 
Section 02, P to Z inclusive; 
2105 — specifies the Item identification number for the description 
of Punch, two-hole, 2 3/4 In. span; 
EA is the approved unit abbreviation for Each. 

61 groups and 575 classes were cataloged with a code book for each group. 
A Cataloging Handbood and a Codification Index were printed to aid the depart- 
ments In writing requisitions for a purchase order. The booklets contained 
Instructions on how to use the codes, a breakdown of the approved unit abbrevia- 
tions, the index of materials and supplies to proper group and class, plus a 
catagorical listing of all the groups and classes. Publication thereof was for 
the purpose of supplying information to a 1 1 departments so that the application 
and use of standard articles could be adopted throughout City and County govern- 
ment. 

During fiscal year 1977-1978 this section was not maintained at an operational 
level but all requisitions for purchase orders were examined for correctness In 
structure, checked for coding and required procedures and distributed to the buyers. 
Contact with the departments was made when discrepancies were found. This resulted 
In considerable savings to the City In money, materials and supplies, delivery time 
and fol low-up correspondence. 

On the following page the bar graph shows the number of new codes assigned 
the past five years. 



12- 



Codes assigned 1962-1972 


6,051 


Bar graph 1972-1977 


5,681 


Total 


II 732 



This total brings to date over 90,000 commodities that are coded and stocked 
In the Purchasing Department warehouse and storerooms. With the vast number of 
changes and the number of new codes assigned there Is a definite need for an up- 
dated printing of the code catalogs, index and a new Instruction manual in the 
handbook, and funds will be requested for this purpose in the forthcoming budget. 
(No personnel were available to the coding section for FY 77-78 thus no data Is 
aval I able). 

NEW C0M0DITY CODES ASSIGNED 



2,000 










j 


1,800 










1 


1,600 












1,400 








1657 




1,200 






" 1 






1,000 






1367 






800 






i 






600 












i 


400 


j 


644 


i | 




No 


200 


1557! 


I . 


I 




Data 



1973-1974 



1974-1975 1975-1976 1976-1977 



1977-1978 



To reach full potential, the coding system must be fully Incorporated Into 
the City's EDP system so that the information could provide: 

1. CONTROL: In the areas of expenditures and Inventory, valuable 
data and statistics for budgeting plus personnel savings; 

2. PERFORMANCE: Increased efficiency In handling orders; rapid 
succession In processing requisitions to vendors and all 
departments; needed Information and data for term contracts; 
and 

3. STANDARDIZATION: further reductions In the kinds and types of 
Items ordered. In order to obtain higher quantity discounts. 



-13- 



PERSONNEL A ACCOUNTS DIVISION 

Purchasing Department's Personnel and Accounts Division handles the clerical 
and supportive duties involved in the purchasing function. 

Bid Section : 

This section Is responsible for typing and mailing all formal and Informal 
bids, price quotations, term contracts and the awards as directed by the Buying 
Division. 



Bids Processed 

Price Quotations 
Informal Bids 
Formal Bids 
Term Contracts 



1976-1977 


1977-1978 


6,075 


6,367 


2,245 


2,354 


322 


364 


155 


130 



The section also handles the clerical aspect of the traveling requisitions to 
purchase orders (monthly repetitive orders processed In quantity on a repeat basis); 
tabulation of bids (microfilmed record of all bids); extentions and additions checked 
on the requisitions, plus calculation of sales tax then assignment of the purchase 
order numbers. After the assignment of the purchase order number the order Is 
xeroxed with seven (7) documents resulting: Vendor's copy-white. Controller's copy- 
blue, Purchasing's copy-green, Material Received Report-yellow & two white copies 
for the department, plus the Advance copy-orange for the department. The section 
also maintains the requisition register, vendor register and the purchase order 
register; handles departmental pay check distribution; and the sale of various city 
documents. 

SALE OF CHARTERS, CODES 4 OTHER DOCUMENTS 



$30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 


$1 


3,78 


5 


SI 


6,61 


D 


$11 

1 


436 

1 


$1 


2, 


16 


$2 
4 


0,00 




8 




1973-1974 


1974-1975 


1975- 


■1976 


1976- 


•1977 


1977-1978 


Payrol 1 


Sect 


ion: 





























The payroll section posts time report Information to tlmerolls Including 
information of time worked, vacations, leaves, overtime and similar Information 
reflecting employee activities during a pay period. This section also provides 
Information to employees and others on employment processes, leave problems, 
salaries and wages plus any other requests for Information regarding departmental 
personnel and payroll activities. 

Accounting Section : 

This section gathers data relative to the preparation of the Purchasing 
Department budget; maintains the posting of expenditures and control of the 
accounts and prepares reports for these accounts; complies financial reports and 
tax statements; approves departmental receipts for deposit with the City Treasurer; 
plus varied accounting duties. 



14- 



Accounts Payable Section: 

Purchase orders are processed for payment after receipt of the HRR (Material 
Received Report) from the department. The amount Is verified with the invoices and 
packing slips received, then sent to the Controller for payment. The date is 
posted In the Purchase Order Register when the order ts sent to the Controller's 
Office for payment or when a Purchase Order Is cancelled. 

With the Implementation of the Vendor Code by the Controller's Office, It is 
hoped that the payments of purchase orders can be completed more rapidly. 

The number of purchase orders to be prepared and processed Is not constant, 
chiefly due to the fact that the requisitions do not flow into the department 
uniformly. Consequently, there are times when high production cannot be sustained 
because of diminished personnel caused by vacation, illness, unfilled positions or 
other conditions beyond Purchasing's control. However, continual effort is made to 
process the requisitions and the subsequent purchase orders with upmost speed, 
accuracy and efficiency. 



DISCOUNTS EARNED 



$140,000 
120,000 
100,000 
80,000 
60,000 
40,000 
20,000 



$107,889 



$148,902 




$74,86 



1973-1974 



1974-1975 



1975-1976 



1976-1977 1977-1978 



Discounts Taken 



Discounts Lost 



Month 


1976-1977 


1977-1978 


Month 


1976-1977 


1977-1978 


July 


$ 7,090.21 


$ 3,012.21 


July 


$ 46.26 


$ 980.11 


August 


6,017.88 


7,080.45 


August 


498.48 


1,161.36 


September 


4,784.01 


8,675.17 


September 


422.21 


1,930.52 


October 


4,776.39 


5,175.34 


October 


472.17 


974.94 


November 


6,123.49 


32,468.24 


November ' 


304.34 


5,887.14 


December 


2,546.30 


8,604.73 


December 


98.23 


1,285.24 


January 


10,130.44 


42,696.87 


January 


252.35 


1,383.94 


February 


6,237.22 


5,331.25 


February 


124.21 


1,480.61 


March 


5,137.07 


6,742.83 


March 


152.13 


1,529.55 


April 


4,713.36 


8,017.05 


April 


975.36 


9,449.81 


May 


9,358.10 


8,163.77 


May 


1,486.53 


1,279.62 


June 


9.403.38 


12,933.61 


June 


2,102.88 


3,876.21 




S76.3I7.85 


$148,901.52 




S 6 935.15 


$31,219.05 



-15- 



[Purchaser of Supplles| 



I Stores & Equipment Supervisor! 

[Asst . Stores & Equ 1 p" . Spvr ,J (Unf II I ed ) 



STORES ANO EQUIPMENT DIVISION 

(51 Employees) 



Inventory Section, Stores Section, Sales Section 



Sr. Clerk Stenographer 

Sr. Clerk Typist 

Sr. Storekeeper (12 - I Unfilled) 

Storekeeper (22 - I Unfilled) 

Asst. Storekeeper (9) 

Asst. Storekeeper (3 CETA, Temporary) 

Inventory Clerk (2) 



The Purchasing Department Stores and Equipment Division operates and maintains 
a central warehouse and several storerooms In various City departments. This 
division Is responsible for the following functions: 

1. Requisitioning, receiving, storing and issuing Materials, Supplies 
and Equipment for use of various City and County Departments; 

2. Sale of surplus and obsolete City Property; 

3. Equipment exchanges between departments; 

4. Maintaining a perpetual Inventory of all Items In storeroom and 
warehouse stock. 

5. Registering and insuring of all City vehicles and processing of 
accident reports for same; 

6. Acquiring and distributing gasoline credit cards. 

The following locations, with a total storage capacity of approximately 1.9 
million square feet, are staffed and opera fed by the Stores and Equipment Division: 



DEPARTMENT 
Purchasing 

Public Health 
Municipal Rai I way 



Water 

S.F. Intl. Airport 
Public Works 
Electricity 
Recreation & Park 
Sheriff 



LOCATION 

Central Warehouse - 

15th & Harrison Sts. 

Centra I Shops - 

800 Quint St. 

S.F.G.H. - 22nd & Potrero 

L.H.H. - 7th & Dewey 

Wood Division 

17th & Potrero and 

-I- Sub Store 

Metro Center 

Geneva & San Jose Ave. 

1990 Newcomb 

Hetch Hetchy - Moccasin 

South San Francisco 

2323 Army St. 

901 Rankin St. 

Golden Gate Park 

Room 331 , City Hal I - 

Jail #1, §2 



TYPE 


INVENTORY AMOUNT 


Stationery 


% 21,837.00 


Janitorial 


12,823.00 


Genera 1 


45,670.00 


General 


314,150.00 


General 


789,111.00 


General 


736,238.00 


General 


429,609.00 


General 


690,655.00 


General 


971,604.00 • 


General 


73,428.00 


Genera 1 


78,564.00 


Genera 1 


200,765.00 


General 


70,425.00 


General 


52,139.00 


General 


352,029.00 


TOTAL 


$4,839,047.00 



-16- 



STORES SECTION 

During fiscal year 1977-78, this section had been adversely affected by a 
continuous shortage of storekeepers due to budget cuts, IMness and Injury, and 
primarily from an Insufficiency In the staffing pattern. Three prime areas of 
concern were: 

1. Introduction of the new Wood Division storeroom where the addition of 
new service windows and a 24-hour operation (3 shifts) required 
additional personnel but, In fact, was operated with the same number 
of people. 

2. San Francisco General Hospital storeroom, a major undertaking, was 
short three storekeepers most of this period due to Illness or 
Injury. 

3. San Francisco International Airport storeroom assumed a greater workload 
with the construction of the new terminal, and as In the two previous 
examples no additional storekeepers were made available. 

The Stores and Equipment division was hard pressed to keep all storerooms 
functioning. Only through the manipulation of personnel between the various opera- 
tions and the diligence of David Sullivan, Charles Ryan, and Eugene Yokley, the 
senior storekeepers at the respective locations, was it possible to maintain an 
adequate level of service. 

INVENTORY SECTION 



This section Is responsible for the Equipment Inventory for all City depart- 
ments. As new equipment Is purchased, the Information is documented and the 
necessary papers forwarded to the requisitioning department. If an item of 
equipment Is lost, damaged, or stolen, the Inventory Section is notified, a follow- 
up Investigation is made, and a report sent to the Board of Supervisors through 
the Purchaser of Supplies. 

Under Section 7.100 of the Charter, the Purchaser, through the Inventory 
section, is required to perform periodic checks of said property to up date the 
perpetual Inventory records. If carried out, this function would locate surplus 
property, assure that all City property was accounted for, and would locate 
equipment not previously recorded. This function has not been performed for many 
years due to Insufficient personnel staffing. 

This section also performs the following additional functions: 

I. Assists In relocation of City offices by securing estimates from the 
contractor, coordinates move with contractor and department, supplies 
necessary materials for the move if required. Fifty-eight relocations 
were made during the fiscal year. 



-17- 



INVENTORY SECTION (Cont'd) 



2. Assists the sales section In the sale of all surplus commodities. 

3. During the past fiscal year assisted the Central Warehouse store- 
keeper In the preparation of stationery orders and deliveries 
thereof to various City departments. 

SALES SECTION: 



This section Is responsible for the sale of all scrap and surplus City 
property under the provisions of section 7.100 of the City Charter. For each sale, 
items are listed and categorized, sales advertised, bids accepted and awards made. 
Receipts from sales are deposited with the City Treasurer within 24 hours. 
Records and correspondence pertaining to each sale Is compiled by the Sales 
Section and recorded with the Purchasing Department general office. 

In January, 1978, a term sale for miscellaneous scrap metal was set up for 

the calendar year and proved to be more satisfactory both as to efficiency and 

monetary return to the City than individual sales of miscellaneous scrap metal 
conducted in previous years. 



Thirty-three (33) sales were conducted by this section, 
of the sales for the fiscal year 1977-1978 are as follows: 



A general breakdown 



DESCRIPTION 

Drain and Waste 01 I 

Grease and Bones 

Waste Paper 

Scrap Metal 

Vehicles 

Surplus Fare Boxes 

Crankshaft 

Bus Parts 

Bus Tires 

Used Machinery 

Surplus Diesel Engine 

Batteries 

X-Ray Film 

Burroughs Computer Equipment 

Addressograph Plates 

Hospital Beds & Equipment 

Fire Hose 

Street Signs 

Bal lot Cans 

X-Ray Unit 

Food Carts 



AMOUNT OF SALE 

$ 1,645.54 

3,197.23 

4,584.24 

30,846.07 

60,314.24 

127.24 

19,286.09 

12,000.00 

10,092.00 

1,800.00 

9,585.00 

625.16 

29,922.64 

106.50 

100.00 

131.50 

1,779.75 

284.48 

168.15 

1,825.00 

30.00 



TOTAL 



$ 188,450.83 



-18- 



SALES SECTION (Cont'd) 

SALES OF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES 

FISCAL YEAR AMOUNT OF SALE 

1973-1974 $2,028,099.00 

(Includes a Sale of Computers for 
$1,976,270.) 

1974-1975 $ 241,255.00 

1975-1976 $ 113,216.00 

1976-1977 $ 162,695.00 

1977-1978 $ 188,451.00 



19- 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Reproduction Bureau provides centralized service to City Departments for 
photography (People, Places, and Objects), offset printing up to 17" x 22", 
ammonia printing for architectural drawing, microfilming (16mm and 35mm) and 
self service copiers. Funds are provided by Work Order, not appropriated. 

Charges for Services: 

1977-1978 

1976-1977 

1975-1976. 

1974-1975 

1973-1974 



$2 46,671 1 ( I ) 



$236,234| 



$212. 788 1 



$337.495t (2) 



$256,0001 



$100,000 $150,000 $200,000 $250,000 $300,000 $350,000 

(1) The increase in work performed required $9,000 less In personal 
services than In the previous year. 

(2) $90,000 was work for Yerba Buena channel led through, but not 
performed by, the Bureau. 

The last two months of the year found much time and effort devoted to FAMIS 
forms: producing them In sufficient quantities and in time for use July I; 
and learning how to use them. 

Ray Suen, the Bureau's Supervisor I for eight years, retired June 21st, with 
27 years with the City. His professional skills and experience with the Bureau 
are greatly missed. 

No new or replacement equipment was acquired. 



-20- 



CENTRAL SHOPS DIVISION 
1977-1978 ANNUAL REPORT 

Section 7.100 of the Charter of the City and County of San 
Francisco provides that the Purchaser of Supplies shall have 
charge of a central garage and shop for the repair of City and 
County equipment. 

In compliance the Central Shops, at 800 Quint Street, and 
allied facilities provide all necessary mechanical maintenance, 
repair and support service for all City departments and divisions 
(exception, Public Utilities). It is the responsibility of the 
Shops to inspect, appraise and make recommendations on all City- 
owned vehicles contemplated for replacement and to aid the various 
departments in the writing of specifications; to receive and ap- 
prove all new vehicles delivered to the City, and to outfit and 
prepare these vehicles for service. 

By an amendment of Chapter 4 of the Administrative Code, the 
Shops are now directly funded under Index 31^ of the Annual Budget, 
for the purchase of automobiles and light trucks to be assigned to 
67 various City departments and bureaus. 

Other Central Shops operations include Golden Gate Park Shop, 
providing maintenance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; 
Hall of Justice Service Station, where fuel and lubricants are pro- 
vided for Police and other City cars, along with inspection and 
light maintenance for Police autos and motorcycles, Department of 
Public Works, Army Street Yard, where fuels, lubricants, preventive 
maintenance and inspection are provided for Public Works vehicles; 
19th Avenue Public Works Station; Health Department Garage; and 
Department of Electricity Garage. (These latter two facilities 
will be closed for service July 1, 1978 for lack of funds). 

Administration of the Shops, under the Purchaser of Supplies, 
is the direct responsibility of Mr. Albert M. Flaherty, General 
Superintendent, aided by Mr. Edmond A. Rames, City Shops Assistant 
Superintendent (Retired 12/31/78) and Mr. Edward Franke Assistant 
Superintendent, temporary assignment. 

The Central Shops, Quint Street operation, has four main main- 
tenance shop areas. (1) Auto and Light Truck Shop (2) Heavy Truck 
and Equipment Shop (3) Fire Apparatus Shop (4) Machine Shop and the 
following auxiliary shops: Metalsmith, Pattern and Ladder Shop, Auto 
Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body and Fender, Tire Service Station. 

Along with the responsibilities for the maintenance and repair 
of mechanical equipment in school building, sewage plants, pumping 
stations, public buildings, etc., the Shops maintain 3,053 units 
of the City-owned automotive fleet. These vehicles and machines 
are valued at approximately 12 million dollars. 

The Division is budgeted for 103 employees. Of these, 85 were 
funded inter-departmentally in the 312 budget while 18 were funded 
directly or through transfer in the 311 budget. Funding restric- 
tions have reduced this staff to 91 employees. 

-21- 



CENTRAL SHOPS - ANNUAL REPORT 



1977 ■ 


- 1978 


INTRODUCTION 




Fire Apparatus 


Shop 



Electric Shop 
Pattern Shop 
Blacksmith Shop 
Paint Shop 
Upholstery Shop 

Truck & Heavy Equipment Shop 

Army St, D.P.W, Station 
19th Ave. D.P.W. Station 
Quint St. Station 
Tire Shop 

Auto S Light Truck Shop 

Machine Shop 

Recreation & Park Shop 

Hall of Justice Service Station 

Conclusion 

Financial Statements & Charts 

Title II Program Report 

-22- 



FIRE APPARATUS SHOP 

The Fire Apparatus Shop combined with five sub-shops , 
namely the Ladder Shop, Paint Shop, Electric Shop, Black- 
smith and Body Shop, and Upholstery Shop, maintain all 
fire-fighting equipment. 

This Shop is staffed with nine Automotive Machinists, 
two Metalsmiths, two Painters, one Body and Fender Worker, 
one Upholsterer, two Pattern Maker, one Truck Driver and 
one Automotive Serviceman. 

Retirements reduced this staff by five (5) craftsmen. 

Shop supervision consists of one Auto Machinist Fore- 
man, Ray Monti, and one Auto Machinist Sub-Foreman, Dino 
Ruggeri. 

The Fire Shop and its sub-shops completed 1,153 job 
orders during the year and responded to and made 1,632 
repairs and services to fire apparatus at their stations 
and in the streets. 

Included in the total of jobs on Fire Apparatus were: 

1 - Detroit Diesel Engine overhauls 

4 - major engine overhauls (gas) 

216 - minor engine repairs - head gaskets, tune-ups, 
valve grinds, water pumps, etc. 

156 - fire pump repairs, leaking gates, gauges, pump 

packings, water plumbing leaks, pressure, capacity 
change-over valves, hose reels and fittings. 

2 - major fire pump overhaul 

5 - standard 5-speed transmission overhauls 
2 - HT70 Allisson automatic transmission 

11 - clutch replacement 

218 - brake repairs - reline, air leaks, spring brake 
replacement, air compressors, misc. air valves, 
quick release, etc. 

48 - 100 foot aerial repairs, ladder locks, bent rungs, 
cables, pulleys, hydraulic pumps, hydraulic leaks, 
gauges, etc. 

6 - Differential overhauls 

8 - 500-gallon water tanks - sandblast, weld and coat 

with rust resistant epoxy. 

6 - differential overhauls 

9 - broken axles 

237 - 248 lube and service jobs performed by our Automotive 
Service Man. Electrical and ignition repairs. 

-23- 



Fire Apparatus Shop 



The Fire Apparatus Shop, along with routine mainten- 
ance and repair, prepared for service i Seagrave Aerial 
and 4 American La France Pumpers. 

All usable parts and accesories were removed from 
"turned-in" time apparatus- refurnished and reused on 
replacement units. 



Ladder and Pattern Shop 

This Shop is staffed with one pattern maker, with 
one position vacant. Duties are to inspect, repair and 
replace any damaged ladders. If any ladders are consi- 
dered unsafe they are Immediately replaced by a stock 
ladder and the damaged one is taken to the shop for re- 
pairs and refinishing. 

During the year this shop repaired or rebuilt M 
ladders, started 6 fire escape ladders and 1 35 ft. 
extension ladder. This shop also repaired and modified 
old patterns for other departments and sub shops. The 
Pattern Shop made 5 new patterns and repaired 12 patterns 
for the water department. 

Other items made here were various size wedges, blocks, 
pegs, small tools, equipment boxes, gleason valve saddles, 
benches and other wood work for the other shops and depart- 
ments. 

With one position vacant the shop is operating at 
half staff. Civil Service had developed a limited list 
of ellgibles but none would accept the position because 
of salary restrictions. 

The result of this is a greatly reduced fire ladder 
replacement program that will ultimately have a negative 
effect on Fire Department operational efficiency. 



Paint Shop 

The paint shop is staffed with l\ painters. They do 
all the painting for the Fire Department, Police Depart- 
ment, D.P.W. and all miscellaneous departments. 

Their duties are to prepare and paint all vehicles 
and items made by the Pattern and Blacksmith Shops. The 
items are various sizes of blocks and pegs, hose bumpers, 
Gleason valve saddles, brackets of all types and engine 
parts. They also put on Fire, Police and Sheriff Depart- 
ment seals, stars and vehicle numbers. 



Paint Shop 

Jobs completed this year by the Paint Shop consist of 
the following: 

86 - Partial fire apparatus 

10 - 500. gallon water tanks (rust resistant epoxy) 
68 - ladders, scraped, sanded, oiled and varnished 
32 - Police and auto (complete) 

2 - complete D P.W. trucks 
27 - partial D.P.W. trucks 

7 - complete high pressure trucks 

1 - complete tow truck 



Electric Shop 

This shop is staffed with 1 Automotive Machinist. His 
duties are to repair, rebuild or replace fuel pumps, car- 
buretors, starters, generators, alternaters, regulators, 
sirens, revolving lites and all power tools such as, chain 
saws, metal and cement cutting saws, high intensity spot 
lites and electric power plants. 

This year the Electric Shop completed 352 jobs. 



Blacksmith Shop 

This shop is staffed with 2 Metalsmiths and 1 Body 
and Fender man. The responsibilities of this shop include 
the manufacturing of new tools and repairs of damaged tools, 
straightening aerial ladders and ladder rungs, weld broken 
machinery, weld fire engine 500 gal. water tanks, sharpen 
and rehandle axes, mauls and sledge hammers. 

They also made 2 aerial tiller cabs, metal compart- 
ments, partitions and metal boxes. Welding for other 
departments is also done in this shop. 

The Body and Fender worker repairs all damages to 
fire apparatus and high pressure trucks. During the past 
fiscal year the Body and Fender Shop completed 5 majors and 
72 minor accident repair. 



Upholstery Shop 

This shop is staffed with 1 Upholsterer. All fabric 
and leather items for the Fire Department, Police Depart- 
ment and D.P.W. is done in this shop. The upholsterer 
makes and installs various sizes, types and lengths of 
straps and belts for Gleason valve saddles, Scott air 
pacs, ladders, hoses, helmet, tool boxes, hose boxes, 
pouches and axes. This shop repairs Stokes stretchers, 
makes covers for aerial console, upholsters seat cushions, 
makes gaskets and reupholsters office furniture for various 
departments. 



-26- 



Truck and Heavy Equipment Shop 

This shop is staffed with 10 Automotive Machinists, 
1 Metalsmith, 1 Automotive Servicer, aided by 2 Title II 
Auto Mechanics and 1 Title II Auto Servicer and supervlaed 
by Arthur Chin. 

The shop maintains and repairs 876 units of a wide 
variety of heavy duty vehicles and equipment. 

Example: 

Ambulances Road graders 

Dump trucks Asphalt Spreaders 

Eductors Asphalt Pavers 

Street Sweepers Asphalt Rollers 

Garbage Compactors Mobil Cranes 

Street Flushers Brush Chippers 

Sewer Tuggers Tractors 

Scoop Mobiles Vans 

Back Hoes Buses 



During the 1977-78 fiscal year 2,156 job orders were 
written. 

Examples of complete work are: 

Complete engine overhauls 15 

Minor engine repairs 159 

Valve grinds 35 

Complete brake overhauls 90 

Minor brake repairs 160 

Complete clutch overhauls 80 

Minor clutch repairs 175 

Generator/alternator overhauls 130 

Minor charging system repairs 210 

Starter overhauls 160 

Complete engine tune-ups 220 

Road Service Calls 245 

Tows 200 

Accident repairs 12 

Battery replacements 120 

Blacksmith jobs 240 

Hydraulic hoist repairs 80 

Automatic transmission repairs 40 

Manual transmission overhauls 56 

Carburator repairs 148 

Exhaust system repair 64 

Driveline repair 44 

Steering repair 104 

Radiator repair 92 

Air system repair 80 

-27- 



Truck and Heavy Equipment Shop 

Body repairs 92 

Glass repair 28 

Sub shops consist of: 

Quint St. Tire Shop - where 1,458 new tires and 1077 
recap tires were installed, 395 road calls made, 52 vehicle's 
tire's were switched and 366 tires were repaired. Two (2) 
Auto Servicers are assigned to this shop. 

19th Ave. Service Station - This station, located at 
19th Ave. near Taraval St. is a garage and dispatching fa- 
cility for D.P.W. machines servicing the west end of the 
City. 

It is staffed by 1 Automotive Servicer who makes minor 
repairs and serviced 127 units and dispensed 71>789 gallons 
of fuel. 

Quint St. Station - This station operates in conjuction 
with the main Central Shop facility - 3^8 vehicles were ser- 
viced and 175,300 gallons of gasoline were dispensed by one 
Automotive Servicer. 

Army St. Station - This station is located in the D.P.W. 
Maintenance Yard at 2323 Army St. 

It is staffed with 1 Auto Machinist and 1 Auto Servicer 
on the day shift and on the swing shift is operated by 1 
Auto Machinist, 3 Auto Servicers and 1 Auto Supervisor II. 
Here vehicles are fueled, receive minor repairs and routine 
preventive maintenance and service. 

The 1977-78 fiscal year saw the following work performed 

Combined day and night shifts: 

Pieces of equipment serviced 826 

Miscellaneous repairs 2,501 

Units routed to shops for repair 127 

Road calls 107 

Gallons of gasoline dispensed 289,^57 

Gallons of diesel fuel dispensed 10,132 

Service and Inspection of mechanical 8l 
street sweepers 

Repair and adjust mechanical street 329 
sweepers 

Gallons of lube oil for sweepers only 189 

Gallons of lube oil dispensed 2,3^3 



-28- 



Auto and Light Truck Shop 

The Auto Shop is staffed with 4 permanent Automotive 
Mechanics, and 4 temporary Automotive Mechanics, 2 perma- 
nent Body and Fender Worker, 1 permanent Auto Painter and 
2 Automotive Servicemen, under the supervision of Henry 
Dosdorian (Acting Supervisor). 

Additionally and for the extent of the Title II pro- 
gram 4 Auto Mechanics, 2 Car and Auto Painters, 4 Body and 
Fender Workers and 1 Auto Servicer are employed under the 
direction of Acting Supervisor Louis Then. 

The Automobile Shop is responsible for the maintenance, 
repair, and outfitting of 1,246 vehicles, which include 
both Passenger and Light Trucks and Motorcycles. 

Major projects accomplished were special outfitting of 
5 Fire Department vehicles, 7 Sheriff station wagons and 96 
Police Patrol vehicles which were equipped with revolving 
roof lights, blue and red roof lights for emergency service, 
security screens and hidden rear door locks. 207 new vehicle 
were inspected and serviced for various departments. 31 
vehicle were completely rebuilt including body work and new 
paint jobs and returned to service. 

A listing of completed jobs include 1007 brake jobs 
including the inspection and replacement as needed of the 
hydraulic system and drums turned on our Ammco Drum Lathe. 
660 engine tune ups were completed and tested with our Sun 
Electronic Engine Tester and Marquette Infarred Emissions 
Analyzer to comply with California Emissions Standards. 
142 automatic transmissions were removed and completely 
rebuilt and 101 automatic transmissions were serviced and 
adjusted in the vehicle to factory specifications. 44 
engine valve job were completed with heads resurfaced and 
magnifluxed for cracks. 175 radiators were remove, rebuilt 
and cooling systems checks for proper cooling. 22 engines 
were removed and completely rebuilt. 268 road service calls 
were made which included on the spot repairs or towing to 
the City Shops for major repairs. 

Accident repairs numbered 309 of these 6 were beyond 
repair. 

To complete accident repairs in the shortest possible 
time at minimum cost to the departments involved, parts 
were cannibalized from the previous years turn-ins and 
vehicles totaled due to accidents. 



Miscellaneous jobs numbered 1059 bringing the total 
3696 jobs completed with an increase of 409 jobs over the 
previous year. 

-29- 



Machine Shop 

The complement of the Machine Shop consist of 8 Main- 
tenance Machinist, 1 permanent position not filled and 1 
temporary man, supervised by Maintenance Machinist Foreman 
Charles Jolly. 

During the fiscal year 1977-1978, the Machine Shop per- 
formed a total of 1,003 jobs of which 501 were Machine Shop 
job orders. 

The Public School System requires the services of the 
Machine Shop to maintain and repair boiler room equipment 
such as vacuums pumps, hot water circulating pumps, fans 
and blowers to maintain the normal heating temperature of 
the classrooms. The repairing of gymnasium folding doors 
mechanisms and windows. 

The Machine Shop also maintains and repairs all machi- 
nery, power and hand tools of the Industrial Arts Sections. 

We also maintain, repair boiler room equipment required 
to heat and ventilate the building of the San Francisco Com- 
munity College. This includes building on other campuses 
throughout the City. 

All three sewage treatment plants require the services 
of (4) Maintenance Machinist on a permanent basis. They 
maintain and repair various equipment necessary for a 24 
hour operation of these vital plants. One man is stationed 
at the North Point and one at the Richmond-Sunset plants. 
Two men are stationed at the South-east plant. They are 
required to maintain the machinery of the bar rakes, sedi- 
mentation tank drive, Including gears, sprockets, bearings 
and shaft; fittering machines; grit tanks and overhauling 
sand and sludge pumps of various size. The repairing of 
fans and air blowers in the ventilate system. 

The Machine Shop manufacture and repair parts for the 
low and high pressure fire hydrants located through the City, 
such as spindles, King valve and nozzle gates. One Machinist 
is assigned to repair the Fire Department's tools and harda 
ware carried on all ifre apparatus, all types of pressure and 
varuum gauges, overhauling and servicing of the high pressure 
equalizing valve better known as the Gleason Valve. We also 
repair and service all types of fire hose shut-off valves and 
3-way monitor and keep in repair the breathing oxygen air 
compressor and their related equipment. 

The Fire Department has 2 high pressure pumping stations 

to supply water to fight large fires, each of the stations 

has 4 large pump. The Machine Shop is now manufacture parts 
for one of these pumps. 

We also provide labor to the Park and Recreation Depart- 
ment in repairing and overhauling irrigation pump located 

-30- 



Machine Shop 

throughout the park system. 

The Machine Shop also does numerous job for Public 
Works, Building and Grounds. These include the repairing 
of firehouse automatic doors, air compressors. Other jobs 
were completed for the Asphalt Plant, Palace of the Legion 
of Honor, Youth Guidance Center, General Hospital and 
Material Testing Laboratory. 

The War Memorial also used the services of the Machine 
Shop in overhaul and repair various pumps and mechanisms 
that operate within the buildings. 

The pumping station system, a division of Public Works 
uses the services of the Machine Shop to repair and overhaul 
pump and sewage pumps. Included is making alterations such 
as adapting a universal drive line from motor to pump. 

The Hose Shop is a sub-section of the Machine Shop. 
This unit is charged with inspection, repair, and distri- 
bution of all fire hose. During the fiscal year 14,000 
feet of nev; 3 inch hose was inspected labeled and distri- 
buted to various Fire Houses. We also inspected, labeled 
over 10,000 feet of 1 1/2 inch hose. Over 10,000 feet of 
in service fire hose were inspected, repaired and sent back 
to the Fire Department. 

A note worthy project completed this past fiscal year 
at the request of the Civil Service Commission was the manu- 
facture and installation of the testing devices used in the 
physical agility section of the Fire Department enterance 
examination. 

These devices were designed to simulate and test the 
contestants ability to lift a 50' ladder, operate a ceiling 
hook, make up fire hoses and fittings, swing a fire axe, 
hook up a Gleason valve and manipulate fire hoses. 



-31- 



Recreation and Park Shop 



The Golden Gate Park Shop is located in the park at 
3rd. Ave. and South Drive and is staffed with 5 Auto Machin- 
ists, 1 Automotive Servicer and supervised by foreman James 
Elliot. Additionally a Title II funded mechanic has been 
assigned to this facility. 

A total of 2,582 repair jobs were processed through 
the shops an Increase of 489 over the previous fiscal year. 

Significant jobs completed included: 

1) Major overhaul at loader trucks and bucket. 

2) Complete rebuild of two (2) Toro Parkmaster 
hydraulic and suspension systems. 

3) Complete overhaul 55 Spartan mower units. 

4) Rebuild and overhaul Ryan Spiker, Ariens Roto- 
tiller, Wayne clipper and tree Topper unit. 

5) Rebuild three (3) truck engines. 



Fuel Dispensed: 

Gasoline 1^2,869 gal 

Diesel fuel 7,373 gal 

Motor Oil 1,350 gal 



A shortage of available funds forced us to reduce the 
shop by two (2) craftsmen during the busy month of June 
1978. The result was a build up of 63 mechanical horticul- 
tural units in the shop which required repairs. 



-32- 



Hall of Justice Service Station 

This branch of the Central Shops Is located at 950 
Bryant St. adjacent to the Hall of Justice. It supplies 
fuel and services to Police vehicles and fuel and oil to 
other City vehicles. 

The station is operated 7 days a week from 7a.m. to 
midnight and is staffed with 8 Automotive Servicers, 2 Auto- 
motive Mechanics (autos), 2 Auto-Mechanics (Motorcycles) 
and 1 Auto Mechanic Supervisor II, James Ryan. Additionally 
3 temporary Auto Servicers an 1 Auto Mechanic are assigned 
and funded through the Title II program. 

This convenient downtown location makes this a high 
volume distribution point for fuel and lubricants for City 
vehicles. 

The past year shows the following services performed: 



Gasoline dispensed: 

Police Department 
Other Departments 



499,050 gallons 
286,467 gallons 

Total 785,517 gallons 



Oil Dispensed 

Police Department 
Other Departments 



12,595 quarts 
2,189 quarts 

Total 14,783 quarts 



Shop Area: 






Vehicles repaired 


(day) 


3,325 


Vehicles repaired 


(night) 


2,242 


P.M.& lube service 




1,409 


Tires changed 




1,806 


Tires repaired 




506 


Batteries serviced 




384 


Tow jobs 




1,338 


Brake jobs 




145 


Motorcycles 






Serviced 




402 


Tires changed 




431 


Batteries serviced 




295 


M/C repairs 




4,667 



Motorcycle repairs and service are for the most part, 
exclusively performed at this station with two mechanics 
and one servicers. This program has permitted us to minimize 
down time on the police fleet of over 300 varied motor- 
cycles at a reduced cost. 



-33- 



CONCLUSION 



The Central Shops 1977-78 (312) Budget of $2,869,742.00 was 
funded by Work Orders In the amount of $2,7^5,655-00. 

Thus the Shops operated through the 1977-78 fiscal year with 
a deficit balance of $124,077-00. 

The result of this inbalance, coupled with a deficit balance 
in the previous fiscal year forced the shops to operate with 12 
employees less than our normal staff. 

This was accomplished by leaving unfilled these positions 
vacated through retirements. 

The negative result of this reduction in staff is that a 
relative reduction in essential maintenance and support services 
takes place on a fleet that shows no reduction in numbers or 
demand for maintenance. 

Only through the extra effort of the remaining Central Shops 
employees and Federal funding through the Title II program are we 
able to continue a barely acceptable level of maintenance. 

This policy of underfunding the Central Shops appears to be 
carrying on into the 1978-79 fiscal year and, if not corrected, 
will require further limiting of staff. 

Proper maintenance of City owned equipment and facilities, 
though not without demands on City funding, is far more cost 
effective than permitting the substantial capital investment to 
deteriorate prematurly. 

It is hoped that budget authorities will recognize this matter 
and take the required steps to resolve it. 

Many governmental agencies are approaching the solution to 
this common problem by coordinating the responsibility for their 
essential in-service transportation operation within a single 
bureau or department. That division acquires the vehicles and 
then "leases" them to the operating departments for a flat periodic 
fee that would include operating expenses and a depreciation fac- 
tor. At the end of a predetermined useful life a reserve fund has 
been accumulated for replacement. We should continue to investi- 
gate and consider the advantages of such a policy. 

So that more meaningful data might be developed for the ad- 
ministration of the Central Shops, the departments we service and 
the budget authorities. We are in the process of improving our 
systems through the "ACAR" project. 

This Automatic Cost Accounting Reporting system is now being 
developed by the CEntral Shops and the E.D.P. bureau of the Con- 
troller office. Its completion is projected for implementation 
beginning the 1979-80 fiscal year. 

-.34- 



UNITS OF CITY-OWNED VEHICLES BY DEPARTMENT 
PER IBM INVENTORY RUN AS OF MAY 26, 197 8 



DEPT, 
NO 

111 

113 
115 
117 
119 
121 
123 
131 
141 
145 
154 
161 
165 
169 
170 
173 
181 
185 
187 
188 
213 
221 
223 
231 
243 
245 
247 
255 
261 
265 
311 
312 



DEPARTMENT 

Adult Probation 

Art Commission 

Assessor 

City Attorney 

City Planning 

Civil Service Commission 

Controller 

S.F. Disaster Corps. 

District Attorney 

Fire Department 

Model Cities Program 

Police Department 

Public Defender 

Social Services 

Single Men's Rehabilitation 

Sheriff 

Board of Supervisors 

Juvenile Court 

Log Cabin 

Hidden Valley School 

California Academy of Sciences 

Chief Administrative Officer 

Coroner 

Dept. of Electricity 

Public Administrator 

Real Estate 

Civic Auditorium 

Registrar of Voters 

Tax Collector 

Weights and Measures 

Purchasing - Main Office 

Purchasing - Central Shops 



NO. OF MOTORIZED 
VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT 

8 

6 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

5 

34 

250 

14 

456 

6 
46 

2 
64 

1 
25 

6 

2 

6 



7 
45 

3 

1 

4 

1 

6 



6 
30 



Dept. of Public Works 

413 Architecture 

415 Bldg. Inspection 

415.1 P.A.C.E. Program 
417 Bldg. Repair 

417.2 Traffic Painting 

421 Engineering 

423 General Office 

424 Personnel Admn. 
426 Water Pollution 
429 Sewer Repair 
431 Street Cleaning 

422 Sanitary Eng. 



56 

6 

126 

29 

24 

1 

3 

28 

117 

124 

12 



-35- 



UNITS OF CITY-OWNED VEHICLES BY DEPARTMENT 





PER IBM INVENTORY RUN. AS OF MAY 


26,1978 


DEPT. 




NO. OF MOTORIZED 


NO 


DEPARTMENT 
Public Health Department 


VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT 


513 


Administration 


10 


545 


Communicable Disease 


1 


531 


Food and Sanitary Inspection 


31 


535 


Health Centers 


5 


539 


Public Health Nursing 


1 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 


15 


553 


Hassler Hospital 





555 


Laguna Honda Hospital 


13 


557 


S.F. General Hospital 


23 


561 


Mental Admn. 


2 


567 


Mental Health 


8 


577 


Bureau of Alcoholism 


3 


621 


De Young Museum 


3 


631 


Public Library 


7 


651 


Rec. & Park - General 


190 


651-S 


Rec. & Park - Non-Auto 


527 


653 


Candlestick Park 


10 


653-S 


Candlestick Park 

S.F. Unified School District 


7 


661-B 


John O'Connell 


2 


661-E 


Shop Trucks 


31 


661-F 


Gardeners' Autos, etc. 


21 


661-G 


Delivery Trucks 


13 


661-H 


Administration 


6 


661-J 


Delivery, Furniture 


7 


669 


City College 

Department of Public Works 


45 


681 


DPW-Street Repair 


108 


683 


Bureau of Engineering 


33 


686 


DPW-Tree Planting 


47 


684 


Road Fund 


11 




SUB-TOTAL 


2,764 


161-A 


Police Solos 


46 


161-M 


Police 3 Wheels 


186 


161-S 


Police Scooters 


38 


161-T 


Police Trail Bikes 


19 




GRAND TOTAL 


3,053 



-36- 



CENTRAL SHOPS 





ANNUAL 


REPORT 










DEPARTMENTAL 


EXPENDITURES 






MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR 


OF AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 








1977- 


-1978 


WORK ORDERS 




DEPT. 








NO 


DEPARTMENT 




RECEIVED 


EXPENDED 




111 


Adult Probation 




$ 1,075.00 


627. 


,00 


113 


Art Commission 




2,800.00 


2,394, 


,00 


115 


Assessor 




1,000.00 


485. 


,00 


117 


City Attorney 




414.00 


414, 


,00 


119 


City Planning 




1,300.00 


1,024, 


,00 


121 


Civil Service 




275.00 


225, 


,00 


123 


Controller 




350.00 


29. 


,00 


131 


Emergency Services 




1,700.00 


1,192, 


,00 


141 


District Attorney 




7,700.00 


7,474, 


,00 


141.2 


Family Support 




3,620.00 


2,643, 


,00 


145 


Fire Department 




499,900.00 


521,735, 


,00 


145.1 


Equipment & Houses 




170,000.00 


149,872, 


,00 


145.3 


High Pressure 




19,788.00 


21,487, 


,00 


154 


Model Cities 




6,824.00 


4,728, 


,00 


161 


Police Department 




455,890.00 


458,823, 


,00 


161MR 


Motorcycles 




79,717.00 


69,622, 


,00 


165 


Public Defender 




4,000.00 


2,166, 


,00 


169 


Social Services 




11,850.00 


11,460, 


,00 


173 


Sheriff 




26,700.00 


24,262, 


,00 


181 


Supervisors 




1,300.00 


965, 


,00 


185 


Probation Office 




9.800.00 


6,434, 


,00 


187 


Log Cabin 




3,000.00 


4,303, 


,00 


188 


Hidden Valley 




1,500.00 


700, 


,00 


213 


Academy of Sciences 




1,100.00 


900, 


,00 


221 


C.A.O. 




600.00 


32, 


,00 


223 


Coroner 




2,000.00 


2,694, 


,00 


231 


Electricity 




17,000.00 


17,086, 


,00 


243 


Public Administrators 


1,610.00 


1,082, 


,00 


245 


Real Estate 




225.00 


83, 


,00 


255 


Registrar 




200.00 


48, 


,00 


261 


Tax Collector 




2,100.00 


1,186, 


,00 


265 


Wgts. & Measures 




2,100.00 


1,088, 


,00 


311 


Purchasing 




1,200.00 


629. 


,00 


413 


Architecture 




6,250.00 


3,483. 


.00 


415 


Bldg. Inspection 




20,000.00 


11,022. 


.00 


415.1 


FoA.C.E. 




3,124.00 


1,368. 


00 


417 


Bldg. Repair 




39,500.00 


36,490. 


00 


417.2 


Traffic Paint 




13,000.00 


12,238. 


,00 


421 


Engineering 




12,000.00 


5,228. 


.00 


422 


Sanitary Engineering 




5,200.00 


3,885. 


00 


423 


General Office 




675.00 


314. 


00 


424 


Personnel Adm. 




850.00 


392. 


00 


426 


Water Pollution 




8,000.00 


7,491. 


00 


429 


Sewer Repair 




72,600.00 


77,836. 


00 


431 


Street Clean 




150,600.00 


158,803. 


00 


431.1 


Broom Cores 




16,500.00 


11,700. 


00 


431.3 


Garageman 




21,089.00 


25,672. 


00 


431.4 


Auto Machinist 




76,585.00 


59,081. 


00 



•37- 



CENTRAL SHOPS 





ANNUAL REPORT 










DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES 




MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 






1977-1978 








DEPT. 






WORK ORDERS 




NO 


DEPARTMENT 
Administration 


$ 


RECEIVED 


EXPENDED 


513 


4,500.00 $ 


4,204.00 


531 


Environmental Health 




9,450.00 


8,417.00 


535 


Health Centers 




1,600.00 


665.00 


539 


Nursing 




150.00 


o — 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 




47,000.00 


48,317.00 


555 


Laguna Honda 




5,000.00 


4,089.00 


557 


S.F. Hospital 




8,000.00 


7,096.00 


567 


Mental Health 




5,500.00 


5,183.00 


577 


Bureau Alcoholics 




480.00 


535.00 


621 


De Young Museum 




1,400.00 


413.00 


631 


Library 




3,300.00 


2,583.00 


651 


Recreation and Park 




233,500.00 


277,612.00 


651.8 


Recreation & Park (General) 


1,500.00 


1,166.00 


653 


Candlestick Park 




2,000.00 


905-00 


661 


School District 




54,600.00 


56,756.00 


669 


City College 




29,800.00 


27,719.00 


681 


Street Repair 




136,350.00 


154,465.00 


681AS 


Army Street 




44,820.00 


28,661.00 


683 


Traffic Engineering 




15,500.00 


15,731.00 


684 


Road Fund 




3,500.00 


2,593.00 


686 


Street Planting 




18,500.00 


17,622.00 


725 


Airport 




29,400.00 


13,580.00 



$ 2,440,461.00 $ 2,411,207.00 



Add: Funds budgeted and 

expended for special Work Orders$ 

Funds expended for miscellaneous 
items (Retirements, Payments in 
lieu of Sick Leave, Vacation, etc) 

Unexpended Balance 



305,194.00 $ 240,216.00 

$ 25,877.00 
$ 68,355.00 



$ 2,745,655.00 $ 2,745,655-00 



58- 



INDEX 
312 

110 
111 
112 
130 
111 
112 
132 
200 
300 
800 
863 



CENTRAL SHOPS 
ANNUAL REPORT 



COMPARISON OF EXPENDITURES WITH AMOUNT BUDGETED 



SUMMARY 

Permanent Salaries 

Overtime 

Holiday Pay 

Salaries - Crafts 

Overtime - Crafts 

Holiday Pay - Crafts 

Temporary Salaries - Crafts 

Contractual Services 

Materials and Supplies 

Fixed Charges 

Mandatory Fringe Benefits 



BUDGETED 


EXPENDED 


1977- 1978 


1977-1978 


$ 129,782.00 


$ 107,170.00 


1,488,198.00 


1,401,956.00 


7,144.00 


10,139.00 


3,272.00 


1,992.00 


'ts 55,228.00 


27,511.00 


220,260.00 


199,913.00 


561,300.00 


583,571.00 


60.00 


65.00 


404,498.00 


344,983.00 


$ 2,869,742.00 


$ 2,677,300.00 



Central Shops Budget 

Actual Work Orders 
Received 



$ 2,869,742.00 



$ 2,745,655.00 
Less: Total Expenditures (2,677,300.00) 





Unexpended Balance 


$ 


68,355.00 


INDEX 




BUDGETED 


311 


SUMMARY 




1977-1978 


110 


Permanent Salaries 


$ 


61,802.00 


130 


Wages 




236,351.00 


131 


Holiday Pay and Overtime 




4,571.00 


132 


Temporary Wages 




5,899.00 


863 


Mandatory Fringe 








Benefits 




74,538.00 






$ 


383,161.00 




Unexpended Balance 








$ 


383,161.00 



Grand Total 311 & 312 Expenditures 
312 - $ 2,677,300.00 
311 - $ 351,880.00 
$ 3,029,180.00 



EXPENDED 
1977-1978 

$ 61,802.00 

213,409.00 

2,131.00 

74,538.00 
$ 351,880.00 

31,281.00 
$ 383,161.00 



-39- 



CITY & COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 
PURCHASING DEPT. CENTRAL SHOPS 
ORGANIZATION CHART 



6-30-78 



1162 Purchaser of Supplies 
Department Head 



7150 City Shops Gen, 

Administration 



Super, 



7277 City Shops Ast. Super 
Supervision 



STORES - SUPPLIES 

(By Assignment, 
Central Warehouse) 
1936 Sr. Storekeeper 
1934 Storekeeper 



FIRE SHOPS 

1-7254 Auto Mach. Supervisor 
1-7315 Auto Mach.Asst. .Supr. 
9-7313 Auto Machinist 
4-7410 Auto Service Worker 

BODY 

1 7306 Body Fender Wk'r. 

BLACKSMITH 

3 73«9 Metalsmith 

PAINT 

3-7309 Car-Auto Painter 

PATTERN 

2-7358 Patternmaker 

UPHOLSTERY 

1-7387 Upholsterer 

DELIVERIES 

1-7355 Truck Driver Medium 



AUTO SHOPS 

1-7254 Aut 

8-7381 Aut 

2-7410 Aut 

HALL O F 

1-7382 



1-7313 
3-7381 
8-7410 
D.P.H. 
1-7410 
BODY 



o Mach. Supervisor 

o Mechanic 

o Service Worker 

JUSTICE 
Auto Mech.Asst. Supr 
Auto Machinist 
Auto Mechanic (2T) 
Auto Service Wk'r. 
& D.of E. GARAGE 



Auto Service Worker 



2-7306 
PAINT 



Body Fender Worker 
09 Car-Auto Painter 



-40- 



GENERAL OFFICE 

1-1652 Sr. Accountant 
1-1632 Sr. Account Clerk 
1-1630 Account Clerk 
1-1222 Sr. Pay. Pers. Clerk 
1-1424 Clerk Typist 





TRUCK SHOPS 






1- 


-7249 


Auto 


Me ch. Supervisor 


10- 


-7313 


Auto 


Machinis 


;t 




2- 


-7410 


Auto 


Service 


Worker 




D.P.W. STATION 






1- 


-7315 


Auto 


Mach. Ass 


,'t 


.Supr. 


2- 


-7313 


Auto 


Machinist 




1- 


-7412 


Auto 


Srvc.Wk 


r.Spr. 


3- 


-7410 


Auto 


Service 


Wk 


r. 


1- 


QUINT ST. 


STATION 


Wk 


'r. 


-7410 


Auto 


Service 


1- 


19th 


AVE 


STATIOh 


I 
Wk 


r. 


-7410 


Auto 


Service 




TIRE 


SHOP 








2 


7410 


Auto 


Service 


Worker 




METALSMITH 






1- 


-7389 


Metalsmith 







MACHINE SHOPS 

1-7258 Maint.Mach. Supervisor 
5-7332 Maint. Machinist 

S.E. SEWAGE PLANT 
2-7332 Maint. Machinist 
N.P. SEWAGE PLANT 
1-7332 Maint. Machinist 
R.S. SEWAGE PLANT 
1-7332 Maint. Machinist 



G.G. PARK SHOP 
1-7254 Auto Mach. Supervisor 
5-7313 Auto Machinist 
1-7410 Auto Service Worker 



CENTRAL SHOP EMPLOYMENTS 
6-30-78 



7249 Automotive Mechanic Supervisor I 

7254 Automotive Machinist Supervisor I 

7258 Maintenance Machinist Supervisor I 

7306 Automotive Body & Fender Worker 

7309 Car and Auto Painter 

7313 Automotive Machinist 

7315 Auto Machinist Sub-Foreman 

7332 Maintenance Machinist 

7355 Truck Driver Medium 

7358 Pattern Maker 

7381 Automotive Mechanic 

7381 Automotive Mechanic 

7382 Automotive Mechanic Asst.Supr. 
7410 Automotive Service Worker 

7412 Auto Service Worker-Asst. Supervisor 

1222 Sr. Payroll & Personnel Clerk 

1424 Clerk Typist 

1630 Account Clerk 

1632 Sr. Account Clerk 

1652 Sr. Accountant 

7150 City Shops General Superintendent 

7277 City Shops Ass't. Superintendent 

7387 Upholsterer 

7389 Metalsmith 



-41- 





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RETIREMENTS 



The 1977-1978 Fiscal Year saw the following employees 
separated from the service through retirement. They have 
each completed many loyal and productive years in the ser- 
vice of the City and County of San Francisco. Their skills 
and contribution to the Shops will be missed. 



NAME 
Edmond A. Rames 

George M. Flaherty 
Roy B. Murray 

Vincent Sanini 
Ralph B. Cook 



RETIREMENT 

TITLE DATE 

City Shops Ass't. 

Sup't. 12-31-77 

Truck Driver 6-18-78 

Maintenance 

Machinist 2-3-78 

Auto Mechanic 3-30-78 

Auto Mechanic 8-31-77 



SERVICE 

35 years 
39 years 

25 years 

15 years 

7 years 



Harry Scott (Deceased) Auto Mechanic 10-20-77 



2 1/2 years 



-42- 



CENTRAL SHOPS 





ANNUAL REPORT 








GASOLINE EXPENDITURES 








1977-1978 






DEPT. 








NO 


DEPARTMENT 


EXPENDED 




111 


Adult Probation $ 


1,097. 


00 


113 


Art Commission 


1,649. 


,00 


115 


Assessor 


11. 


,00 


117 


City Attorney 


17. 


,00 


119 


City Planning 


909. 


,00 


121 


Civil Service Commission 


10. 


,00 


123 


Controller 


22. 


,00 


131 


Emergency Services 


1,332. 


,00 


141 


District Attorney 


8,467. 


,00 


141.2 


Family Support 


3,015. 


,00 


145 


Fire Department 


669. 


,00 


151 


Mayor 


98. 


,00 


154 


Model Cities 


9,223. 


,00 


161 


Police 


263,559. 


,00 


165 


Public Defender 


2,795. 


,00 


169 


Social Services 


8,279. 


,00 


173 


Sheriff 


15,645. 


,00 


181 


Supervisors 


395. 


,00 


185 


Probation Office 


3,633. 


,00 


187 


Log Cabin 


568, 


,00 


188 


Hidden Valley 


21, 


,00 


213 


Academy of Sciences 


986, 


,00 


221 


C.A.O. 


593. 


,00 


223 


Coroner 


2,160, 


,00 


231 


Electricity 


14,634, 


,00 


243 


Public Administration 


732, 


,00 


245 


Real Estate 


117. 


,00 


255 


Registrar 


1,308, 


,00 


261 


Tax Collector 


1,144, 


,00 


265 


Wgts. & Measures 


1,841, 


,00 


311 


Purchasing 


1,092, 


,00 


312 


Central Shops 


6,244, 


,00 


413 


Architecture 


1,924, 


,00 


415 


Bldg. Inspection 


14,211, 


,00 


417 


Bldg. Repair 


35,683. 


,00 


417.2 


Traffic Paint 


3,892, 


,00 


421 


Engineering 


6,352. 


,00 


423 


General Office 


22. 


,00 


424 


Personnel Adm. 


870, 


,00 


422 


Sanitary Engineering 


3,861, 


,00 


426 


Sewage Treatment 


8,549. 


,00 


429 


Sewer Repair 


28,297. 


,00 


431 


Street Clean 


75,570. 


,00 



-43- 



CENTRAL SHOPS 





ANNUAL REPORT 




GASOLINE EXPENDITURES 




1977-1978 


DEPT. 




NO 


DEPARTMENT 


513 


Administration 


531 


Pood & Sanit. 


535 


Health Centers 


545 


Com. Disease 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 


555 


Laguna Honda 


557 


S.F. Hospital 


567 


Mental Health 


577 


Bureau Alcoholics 


621 


Fine ARts Museum 


631 


Library 


651 


Recreation and Park 


661 


School District 


669 


City College 


681 


Street Repair 


683 


Traffic Engineering 


684 


Road Fund 


686 


Street Planting 


735 


Muni RAilway 


755 


Hetch Hetchy 


775 


Port 



EXPENDED 

S 1,821.00 

6,564.00 

526.00 

246.00 

26,914.00 

196.00 

6,995.00 

8,276.00 

1,321.00 

395.00 

2,606.00 

8,207.00 

20,972.00 

1,212.00 

46,450.00 

12,357.00 

2,621.00 

13,410.00 

6,300.00 

1,133.00 

45.00 

$ 700,066.00 



-44- 



Qal. X 1000 
1,600 

1,500 

1,400 

1,300 

1,200 

1,100 

1,000 

900 

800 

700 

600 

500 



Gasoline Dispensed through the Central Shops 



1973-74 



1974-75 



1975-76 



1976-77 



1977-78 



Hall of Justice Station 
Quint St. Station 
Army St. Station 
19th Ave. Station 
Recreation & Park Station 

1977-78 Total 



790,858 gallons 

175,300 gallons 

289,457 gallons 

71,790 gallons 

142,869 gallons 

1,470,274 gallons 



-45- 



CENTRAL SHOPS JOB ORDERS 




1973-7^4 



197*4-75 



1975-76 



1976-77 1977-78 



3,000,000 

2,750,000 

2,500,000 

2,250,000 

2,000,000 

1,750,000 

1,500,000 

1,250,000 

1,000,000 

750,000 

500,000 

250,000 



CENTRAL SHOPS EXPENDITURES: WORK ORDERS 




1973-7*4 197*4-75 1975-76 
-46- 



1976-77 



-~ : 



HOW CENTRAL SHOPS SPENT WORK ORDERS (312) 
DURING THE YEAR 1977-1978 




GRAND TOTAL WORK ORDERS EXPENDED 
1976-1977 COMPARISON 



$ 2,677,300.00 
$ 2,59^,878.00 



-47- 



HOW CENTRAL SHOPS SPENT 311 & 312 FUNDS 
DURING THE YEAR 1977-1978 




GRAND TOTAL 1977-1978 
GRAND TOTAL 1976-1977 



$ 3,029,180.00 
$ 2,9^2,538.00 



-48- 



TITLE II - ANTI RECESSION FISCAL ASSISTANCE 



The Central Shops have participated in the Fede- 
rally Funded Title II Program in a very positive way. 

Available funds provided employment to 26 skilled 
persons representing six crafts and permitted the City 
to accelerate maintenance and repair of deferred pro- 
jects, to rehabilitate older city automotive equipment 
and to further extend their useful life. 

A total of 8,309 various jobs were completed during 
the past fiscal year with a total Expenditure of 
$397,559.00. 

Additionally a sum of $16,856.00 from the Central 
Shops allocation was made available to the Muni Railway 
for deferred maintenance to their non revenue equipment. 

A separate "Automatic Cost Accounting Reporting" 
(ACAR) project was initiated. 

The purpose of this project is to: 

1) Modernizing the cost accounting system of the 
Central Shops. 

2) Develop vehicle maintenance management infor- 
mation system. 

3) Recommend methods and procedures that will 
result in increased efficiency in the acqui- 
sition, operation and maintenance of the 
fleet of City owned motorized vehicles and 
equipment . 

The ANTICIPATED BENEFITS are to 

Provide cost and management data for maximum 
efficiency and cost effectiveness of City automotive 
fleet operation. 



-49- 



CENTRAL SHOPS 
TITLE II 
DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1978 



DEPT. NUMBER 

NO. DEPARTMENT OF JOBS 

111 Adult Probation 5 

113 Art Commission 4 

115 Assessor 4 

117 City Attorney 2 

119 City Planning 2 

121 Civil Service 1 

131 Emergency Services 6 

141 District Attorney 26 

141.2 Family Support 11 

145 Fire Department 283 

154 Model Cities 23 

161 Police 549 

161HJ Hall of Justice 5,215 

I65 Public Defender 8 

169 Social Services 51 

173 Sheriff 44 

181 Supervisors 1 

185 Probation Office 13 

187 Log Cabin 4 

188 Hidden Valley 2 
213 Academy of Sciences 1 
221 C.A.O. 1 
223 Coroner 13 
231 Electricity 37 
243 Public Administrator 6 
255 Reglstrat 2 
261 Tax Collector 10 
265 Weights and Measures 18 

311 Purchasing 5 

312 Central Shops 44 
314 Central Shops 47 
413 Architecture 10 
415 Building Inspectioh 58 

415.1 FACE 7 
417 Building Repair 90 

417.2 Traffic Painting 13 

421 Engineering 37 

422 Sanitary Engineering 13 

423 General Office 1 

424 Personnel Administration 2 
426 Water Pollution 23 
429 Sewer Repair 45 
431 Street Cleaning 71 

431 . 3 Garageman 44 
513 Administration 16 
531 Environmental Health 21 



TOTAL COST 

$ 215.92 

862.41 

520.74 

226.00 

130.53 

30.88 

630.23 

3,076.07 

585.43 

36,139.45 

1,359.16 

66,833.09 

45,406.99 

690.56 

3,228.65 

5,131.21 

282.00 

1,146.18 

3,203.43 

177.68 

88.23 

122.40 

1,573.75 

4,836.76 

259.11 
83.24 

773.69 

2,740.45 

345.8O 

66,206.87 

10,065.25 

1,246.52 

4,896.32 

259.35 

10,443.45 

1,478.74 

3,988.89 

1,000.83 

92.66 

205.90 

1,374.26 

6,292.75 

11,077.73 

325.32 

1,919.15 

2,253,66 



-50- 





CENTRAL SHOPS 






TITLE II 






DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES 






YEAR ENDING JUNE 10. 1978 




DEFT. 


NUMBER 




NO. 


DEPARTMENT OF JOBS 


TOTAL COST 


535 


Health Centers 3 


$ 598. 10 


545 


Cummin i cable Desease 1 


107.07 


551 


Emergency Hospitals 8 


2,016.14 


555 


Laguna Honda 10 


860.74 


557 


General Hospital 35 


2,704.51 


567 


Mental Health 26 


1.716.97 


577 


Bureau of Alcoholism 1 


198. 39 


621 


Fine Arts Museum 1 


71.35 


631 


Library 8 


742.90 


651 


Recreation and Park 412 


28,494.68 


661 


School District 45 


3,530.17 


669 


City College 23 


2,398.76 


681 


Street Repair 117 


19,268.83 


681AS 


Army Street 568 


4,829.84 


683 


Traffic Engineering 40 


4,174.90 


684 


Road Fund 13 


1,099.22 


686 


Street Planting 26 


3,774.49 




Miscellaneous 83 


17.145.05 




8,309 


$ 397,559.80 



-51-